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The Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

The RockShox Reverb is likely the single most common dropper post on the market today. Much of that popularity stems from the Reverb being spec’d as stock equipment on countless mountain bikes. If your bike is spec’d with a SRAM drivetrain, it probably has SRAM brakes, RockShox suspension, and a Reverb dropper. The Reverb differs from every other dropper in one major way: its remote is hydraulic, as opposed to mechanical.

Until just recently, the only remote option offered was a small button. The standard RockShox remote is far from ergonomically friendly and takes considerable force to activate. Earlier this year, RockShox finally got around to releasing a new remote that mimics the design of their shifter paddles. However, it’s still a fully-hydraulic system.

Wolf Tooth Components took the idea a step further with their new ReMote Sustain for the Reverb dropper. It’s a paddle-style lever, but it also converts the actuation from hydraulic to mechanical.

Specs

A barrel adjuster lets you dial in the perfect feel (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

The ReMote Sustain only works with the A2 and B1 Reverb Stealth posts. There’s a handy guide on Wolf Tooth’s website to check compatibility if you’re unsure of your post’s generation. Besides knowing which version post you have, you’ll also need to select the appropriate clamp: SRAM Matchmaker, Shimano, or standard 22.2mm clamp. I opted for the 22.2 clamp for maximum versatility since I’m particular about my cockpit setup.

Included in the kit are the remote, a new base, a shifter cable, Jagwire shifter housing, and a cable crimp. Pricing for the ReMote Sustain ranges from $90-$100 depending on the clamp you choose.

Installation

A Delrin (a special thermoplastic) base replaces the Connectamajig on the Reverb (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

Wolf Tooth provides thorough written instructions as well as a video that details the installation procedure. Overall, it’s a straightforward and quick job despite there being numerous steps. In all, it took me less than one beer to make the swap. The only issue I ran into was trying to disconnect the Connectamajig from the hose at the bottom of the post. It was being stubborn, and since I didn’t need it anymore, I opted to simply cut the hose. The remainder of the swap was trouble-free.

On the Trail

You don’t even need to hit the trail to appreciate the benefits of the ReMote Sustain — they are apparent from the first press. Being much larger than the stock button, the ReMote is much easier to find without fumbling. The aggressively-textured tip of the ReMote also helps in this regard, although gloveless riders may find it too abrasive for their bare thumbs.

Maybe a little too much grip on the lever’s surface (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

The lever action is incredibly smooth thanks to the large 21mm bearing Wolf Tooth uses in the pivot. It also takes considerably less force to actuate the post, and the post reacts quicker. All this means you can get your Reverb out of the way faster and fine-tune the height more easily, making for a more enjoyable riding experience.

A giant bearing provides silky-smooth operation (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

Beyond the improved ergonomics, feel, and precision, there are other more practical benefits to the ReMote. Namely, routing a cable and housing through a frame is much easier and cleaner than messing with a hydraulic line. Swapping a post between bikes or removing it for travel is now much easier with the ReMote. Ditching the Connectamajig frees up 40mm of space inside the frame, so many riders can bump up their post travel — say, from 125mm of drop to 150mm.

Comparing Options

The RockShox 1x remote (left) compared to the Wolf Tooth

Obviously, the ReMote is a huge step up from the classic Reverb button. Really, between those two, there is no comparison. The ReMote beats it in every way, besides the fact it’s a $100 upgrade. But how does the Wolf Tooth ReMote compare to RockShox’s own paddle remote? After spending a couple days on a demo bike equipped with the RockShox paddle, the ReMote remains the clear-cut winner.

The RockShox option is a huge improvement to be sure, but it remains hampered by its hydraulic actuation. The paddle provides more leverage, but you still have to overcome the system pressure. After riding both, the mechanical route is frankly better. Upgrading to either the RockShox paddle or the Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain runs about $100, so price isn’t a factor in the decision.

If you buy a new bike spec’d with the RockShox paddle, I would leave well enough alone. But for anyone considering upgrading their older Reverb post, the Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain is the only way to go.

Thanks to Wolf Tooth Components for providing the ReMote Sustain for review.

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