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outbraker-1

If you’re reading this article, chances are you don’t need the OutBraker system. But don’t stop reading yet! The OutBraker is an interesting MTB product that is actually pretty useful for a lot of people, though not necessarily expert mountain bikers.

The main purpose of the OutBraker is to make braking easier, primarily by reducing the chances of going endo due to grabbing a fist full of front brakes. The device is attached inline to the front brake on virtually any hydraulic braking system, and can be tuned for optimal stopping power based on the rider’s weight and ability.

Adjustment barrel.

Adjustment barrel.

Even more interesting is another version of the OutBraker that allows the rider to control both front and rear brakes with a single lever. Again, this isn’t for expert riders who are capable of modulating front and rear braking based on conditions. Still, there are a number of riders who can benefit from such a system:

  • New riders can get confused in a must-brake situation and may grab just the front brake, resulting in a crash. A single lever makes a bike even more point-and-shoot.
  • Adaptive riders, specifically those with a disability that may prevent them from keeping two hands on the bars, have been using single lever braking systems for years.
  • Riders who are looking for extreme measures to save bike weight might appreciate such a system. Honestly I’m not sure about this since the OutBraker adds nearly the same amount of weight as a second brake lever, but I suppose it’s possible. If anything, it does free up bar space for suspension lockout and dropper post remotes.
Look at all that bar space!

Look at all that bar space!

In its current form, the OutBraker applies equal pressure to front and rear brakes but in the future the product may be offered with a different mix (say, 40% front, 60% rear.) Unfortunately overall stopping power is reduced as well so again, in its current form, this is not really a product for serious riders. Still, if you ask me, it’s an interesting concept to think about…

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# Comments

  • stumpyfsr

    It is interesting concept. I’d like to see updated version. But not seeing myself using one – every trail dictates different braking power distribution.

  • Alvin Mullen

    Hmmm, but in a situation on a very steep down hill and need the rear only to keep from digging in the front and going over the bars, or on a failed uphill where you need the front only to keep from flipping backward down the hill it would be of no use at all.

  • MaxwellD

    This seems like a not bad idea, but what happens on a flow trail when you need to stop fast, you would prob. slide and wreck the trail, I might stick to manual 2 brakes! Also if your brakes go out, they both do!

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