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Photo courtesy Ibis Cycles

Ibis has just announced the 4th generation of their venerable Mojo HD enduro bike. This full-carbon enduro destroyer continues to feature 153mm of rear travel, but the rest of the bike has seen tweaks in the latest model.

Ibis says that the HD4 features “refined progressive geometry” with Dave Weagle’s “most efficient system to date,” the dw-link v5 kinematics. The increased progressiveness should provide better protection against big hits and massive drops.

The new head tube angle is a slack 64.9 degrees, with reach numbers increasing across all size ranges. However, the actual amount of reach increase varies, from 4mm on a size small to 34mm on a size XL. For a detailed geometry breakdown, be sure to visit Ibis’s website.

As a massive fan of frame bags, one drawback of suspension designs similar to that of the Mojo HD is the inability to run a bag. However, apparently Ibis is partnering with Blackburn on a small bag specifically designed for this frame! Photo: Ibis

The carbon frame has been reengineered as well, with a “30% stiffer upper link [and] 40% stiffer lower link,” according to Ibis. In addition, the rest of the carbon layup has been reengineered, “yielding greater frame stiffness overall.”

Photo: Ibis

One final update is that the seat tubes have been shortened and the “bore depth increased,” which will allow for the longest dropper posts possible. Seat tubes shortening in size is a trend that we’re seeing develop across many brands. This helps accommodate the latest crop of long travel dropper posts on even the smallest size frames, so riders can “use the longest seatpost possible and still get their correct saddle height,” according to Ibis. “On the Medium, Large, and X-Large sizes, almost everyone should be able to use 170mm dropper seaposts, while 150mm dropper seatposts should work for almost all Small size owners,” according to Ibis.

As far as the component spec, while many of the exact components vary from model to model, the HD4 frame is designed for use with a 160mm fork, and is approved for up to a 170mm fork. The stays can accommodate 27.5″ tires of 2.3″, 2.5″, 2.6″, and 2.8″ Plus sizes. Despite this wide range of tire sizes, Ibis claims that the BB height, when you factor in tire sag, is the same across all sizes.

Weight for the frame and shock in a size large is 6.6lbs (2.98kg). HD4 framesets start at $2,999, with complete builds ranging up to $9,399 with a SRAM Eagle XX1 build.

Photo: Ibis

More photos for your viewing pleasure:

Photo by Dave Trumpore, Courtesy of Ibis

Photo: Ibis

Photo by Dave Trumpore, Courtesy of Ibis

Photo by Dave Trumpore, Courtesy of Ibis

Photo by Dave Trumpore, Courtesy of Ibis

Photo by Josh Sawyer and Courtesy of Ibis Cycles

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# Comments

  • mongwolf

    Niiiiiice. I’m glad to see Ibis make the TT and Reach measurements substantially longer on the Mojo HDs.

  • drcbrath

    I have been looking all day for a front derailleur mount on it; but, it looks like the HD4 is 1x specific. I might have to get a Hammerschmidt.

  • Zoso

    You can’t see it in the pics, but it’s on the backside of the seat tube.

    • drcbrath

      I picked up my new HD4 two days ago. There is no front derailleur mount not even hidden on back of the seat tube.

  • Aaron Chamberlain

    The orange team edition Fox fork looks terrible with that red. Otherwise a gorgeous bike! I really like the silver/black combo.

    • mongwolf

      Good observation Aaron. I agree the silver/black combo looks really nice and orange fork doesn’t fit at all. Did we just agree on something related to appearances? Amazing. The black fork on front in the top photo is pretty okay imo. What I would like to see is a dark blackish red fork, matching the dark red on the rear triangle and and lower seat and down tubes.

  • mongwolf

    I’m also glad to see Ibis catching up with the industry (let’s call it what it is) with its reach measurements. I love my old Ibis HD, but it is a small cockpit. Before this new HD4, you had to go up a size to improve the fit. And now we’ll have to see what happens with the new Polygon and Marin. Maybe the industry is going to have to play catch up.

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