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Tags:
Level: Intermediate
Length: 1 mi (1.6 km)
Surface: Singletrack
Configuration: Connector
Elevation: +20/32 ft
Total: 23 riders
 

Mountain Biking Deer Lake Lodge / 664

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#156 of 531 mountain bike trails in North Carolina
#4580 in the world

Odds are you will ride this trail either leaving from or returning to the main trailhead. Most of this trail is dirt singletrack, but part of it is actually paved (although it is still pretty narrow).

Before you go
  • No Drinking water 
  • No E-bikes permitted 
  • No Fat biking allowed in winter 
  • No Fee required 
  • No Lift service 
  • Night riding allowed 
  • No Pump track 
  • No Restrooms 
Getting there
Part of the Bent Creek trail system.
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Deer Lake Lodge / 664 Trail map

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Local Info

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Trail checkins

Matthew Aires (on Oct 10, 2019)
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Trail conditions

Good (on Sep 13, 2019)
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Camping & Lodging

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Deer Lake Lodge / 664 videos

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Mountain Bike Trails Near Asheville, North Carolina

***
Beginner | 33 mi
Intermediate | 5 mi
*****
Intermediate | 0 mi

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Reviews

  • bikerbrad
    ****

    This trail offers a good challenge to biker's at several levels. Several technical areas and an overall good ride.

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  • bikerbrad
    ****

    Rode this trail to Wolf Creek. It's a good trail with a good mix of climbs and decents.

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  • Vlad Stepanov
    *****

    This is about a 1 mile trail, but the trail it's self is really nice. Lots of jumps, some downhill and uphill, but nothing too steep.

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  • Greg Heil
    **

    I imagine the paved part, which is right near the parking lot, is so to help it hold up to the massive amount of traffic leaving the trailhead before it disperses into the rest of the trail system.

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