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Gamut's Podium pedals (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

Gamut’s Podium pedals (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

Most of my riding is done in clipless pedals, but I still like to break out the flats every now and then to mix things up. They keep your skills sharp and they are undeniably fun. Gamut’s new Podium pedals are large, thin, and light on paper, but how did they fare out on the trail?

Design

With a 100mm X 100mm platform, the Podium pedals should work well with most rider’s feet. For reference, I wear a size 11 shoe, and my foot was very comfortable on the platform. They are also thin, with a concave profile that tapers from 10mm to 8mm. Their edges are chamfered to help them slide over obstacles.

A thin, concave profile (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

A thin, concave profile (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

Each side uses nine pins for a total of 18 per pedal. Gamut ships the pedals with their unique, hollow aluminum pins already installed. They also include a few spares. You can purchase stainless steel pins from their webstore if you want something more durable.

Gamut ships the Podium pedals with aluminum pins, but more durable stainless steel pins are available (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

Gamut ships the Podium pedals with aluminum pins, but more durable stainless steel pins are available (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

Gamut uses a chromoly axle and four sealed cartridge bearings per pedal. There is one large bearing at the threaded end of the axle and three smaller bearings at the other. The pedals can be rebuilt fairly easily, assuming you have a bearing removal tool and press.

The Podium pedals come in at 298g for the pair and retail for $170.

On the Trail

I rode Gamut’s pedals on a variety of bikes–from a hardtail to a DH bike–over the course of the summer. On my first ride, I clipped a pedal hard enough that I almost went over the bars. Thankfully, I was able to ride it out, but the pedals took the brunt of the impact. A few of the pins got mangled and two were sheared off completely. The rest of the pins held up well throughout the remainder of the test.

Riding Snowshoe (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

Riding Snowshoe (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

My feet felt comfortable and planted on the large platform, but I did find that I had some heel rub on certain bikes. The pedals have a relatively short axle, so the body of the pedal sits very close to the crank arm. In fact, I had to remove the protective rubber boots on my carbon cranks for the pedals to spin freely. On my Kona Process, I would rub the stays more often than with other pedals I have tired. Although, I should mention that the Process has some of the widest stays around.

Snowshoe (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

Snowshoe (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

During a trip to Snowshoe, West Virginia, I used them on a Specialized Demo 8 DH bike. On lift-serviced terrain is where the Podium pedals really shined. I really appreciated their narrow stance here, as it gave me more clearance when dropping into rooty, rocky terrain. They also allowed me to steer with my feet and really drive the rear of the bike through corners.

Finish Line

I found a DH bike to be the best match for the Podium pedals (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

I found a DH bike to be the best match for the Podium pedals (photo: Aaron Chamberlain)

Gamut’s Podium pedals have withstood a summer of abuse. Apart from some cosmetic scratches and a handful of damaged pins, they feel as good as new. The bearings still spin smoothly and they have yet to develop any slop or squeaks. I think their best application is on a DH bike, especially if you are already prone to heel rub. With a slightly longer axle, they would be a better all-around pedal.

Thanks to Gamut for providing the Podium pedals for review

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# Comments

  • Daniel Lee Dault Jr.

    I only use flats i hate clipon pedals they dont mesh with my riding style which consists of using my feet as a balance system if the back end slides out going around a corner which has happend many of times and without having my leg capable of catching the bike and myself would of resulted in a fall

  • kwogfive

    I ride flats on a fatbike and the wide stance means my pedals hit the dirt quite a bit. The thin profile and short axle are exactly what I need to minimize the time I spend dragging the pins.

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