--
SHARES
  

FLR Cut CU 2048_1024

All photos courtesy 9point8

9point8 has just announced their brand-new Fall Line R dropper post, which they are claiming is the “lightest dropper post you can buy.” You can even cut it down to size if the post is longer than you actually need, which makes this the first-ever cuttable dropper!

unnamed (1)2

Claimed weight for the post-only, uncut, is 386g. Cut weight is 335g. And installed weight (includes typical cut-length of housing, includes supplied lightweight cables and ThumB remote with quick-connector to post), when cut, is less than 400g.

9point8 Fall Line R 400x75 front 2898_3714

The weights mentioned above are for their 400x75mm dropper post, with a 75mm drop. The Fall Line R is also available in a 375x125mm model (125mm drop) that isn’t cuttable. Both posts are available in 30.9mm and 31.6mm sizes. The 30.9mm-diameter 125mm-drop post weighs in at 390g, for the post only.

For the ultralight 75mm model, 9point8 notes that despite it being made of aluminum, it’s lighter than carbon droppers on the market today. But despite this ultra low weight, durability has not been compromised. Here’s how they describe it:

The Fall Line R is just as strong and reliable as all our regular Fall Line droppers. Weight reduction has been achieved through rigorous engineering, careful attention to the architecture of the post, and precision machining. There is no rider weight limit for the Fall Line R. Cross country racing is the obvious application of this new seatpost, but it will perform equally well on trail bikes and enduro; anywhere that reduced weight is desirable.

The 75mm model will retail for $489 and the 125mm for $459. These posts will be available Fall 2017.

9point8 Fall Line R 400 vs 375 shaddow 1024_3072

--
SHARES
  
# Comments

  • Tenman1

    489$ for the 75mm version… Is it just me or is It kind of ridiculous pricings when it comes to dropper posts (it goes for most of the brands)? Yes, I buy the idea/concept but not the price tag.

  • MountainK1ng

    It’s about half a fork’s worth of technology and materials, and it costs about half as much as a fork. I’d prefer cheaper of course, but if it lasts five years it’s good enough value, considering how much it can improve your riding if you learn to take advantage of it.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.


Trending