Glendo State Park

--
SHARES
  
AVERAGE RATING
****
4.35 out of 5
View Topo Map

Intermediate
15
miles

Singletrack
↑ 1,800 ft
↓ 1,700 ft
4,846
elevation (ft)

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Trail Description
About this trail
This a new trail system that is being developed by Wyoming State Parks. As of
September 2012, there are about 16 miles of trail on the ground that can be
ridden in a multitude of connections. The Two Moon Campground is laced with
trails that connect to the trail system. There is a pumptrack near the Group
Shelter. A great weekend of camping and riding can be based in this campground.
added by mazuGranny Gear
Trail Features
Trail features
  • Lift Service
  • Drinking Water
  •   Night Riding
  • Pump Track
  • Restrooms
  • Winter Fat Biking
Directions to Trailhead
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Trail Q&A
Rider Questions
 

2

Q: Directions -Guest

A: http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/pdf/Maps/glendotrailsmap2014small.pdf

jmsell84 answered on May 13, 2017. Did you find this helpful? Yes | No

Answer

 
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Recent Trail Check-ins     (38 total check-ins)
  Catlady307   5 days ago
  Thomas V Carby   on Aug 20, 2017
  Thomas V Carby   on Aug 19, 2017
  jmsell84   on Jun 28, 2017
  Catlady307   on Jun 3, 2017
Photo & Video Gallery (24)
Trail Photos & Videos (24)
 
Reviews (20)
 

Granny Gear

May 13, 2017
jmsell84 Granny Gear  
 
Review: This is a great Trail system in WY. It has a little something for everyone from beginner to advanced. There is a lot of technical areas for some great challenges.

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July 29, 2016
Guest   
 
Review: This is an excellent trail system that in my opinion flows very well and is a lot of fun. It's not near as bad as the previous review. There are some technical sections but have rode much worse in Colorado. The trails aren't crowded like they are in Colorado either. I camped there for a weekend and still didn't have enough time to explore the whole area. The trails around Two Moon campground are awesome. Can't remember the names of all of them but I put in a lot of miles with a huge smile on my force the whole weekend. If you want to get away from the Colorado crowds this is the place to go. A hidden gem and I will definitiely go back. I am from Colorado and love the front range riding but it is nice to get away from the crowds.

Similar Trail: Curt Gowdy, Horsetooth Park

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Granny Gear

July 25, 2016
 
Review: My experience has mainly been with touring, but I recently bought a mountain bike and took it out to Lake Glendo for a camping trip. I started from the Two Moon trailhead and had a little trouble finding my way because of the lack of signage. Once across the road on "Reflector Loop" I knew right away that this was not what I had been expecting and that I was in for a difficult time. Don't get me wrong, I understand that there are some skilled MTB riders who seek out thrills like this, but in my opinion a fun bicycle ride involves being able to appreciate the scenery as well, and this was not really possible for the majority of the corridors I took. I somehow missed the turnoff for the "91 Gigawatt" trail (even though I saw the neighboring one for "Buffalo Run") and thus had to take the infamous "Root Canal." Now the adjective you will see in most of these reviews for the trails marked in red is "technical": this however is a euphemism for "threatening to life and limb"! Although most of the scattered rock had been brushed aside, there is almost continuous jutting surface rock (and some tree roots and stumps): These are often sharp and could easily cause damage to a tire or a rim (or a bone)! The way is frequently crooked and narrow, with tree branches at your elbow and cacti at your feet! I repeatedly needed to put my foot down quickly, but even this was dangerous on that irregular and tapering terrain. I suppose this is all part of the challenge for some riders, but I like to ENJOY a bicycle excursion also. It has always been my routine to rest and stretch my legs on the straight-aways and down-hills, but I had to rapidly train myself out of this habit and adopt the new practice of keeping both pedals at "half-mast"; for whenever I left a pedal at the bottom of its stroke it would get caught on a protruding rock, and it is only by the Grace of God that I was never thrown off balance by this, or by the loose sand of the several hairpin turns bordering upon the precipitous slopes of that very difficult descent. I could not afford to take my eyes off the ground for even a second lest I should find myself tumbling head over heels, and there was no soft place to land! Sometimes the trail itself became so steep that I had to be very careful not to use the front brake (or squeeze it too hard) or I might well have been thrown headlong or spilled over my own handlebars! I finally got to a ranger station at the base of the trail, next to a river, where there were restrooms, but no drinkable water. I rode along the "Wetlands" trail for a bit, and this was (for me) the only agreeable part of the course: It was paved with white gravel, and I was able to observe the foliage and fauna while relaxing for a spell (I saw some lovely purple and yellow flowers previously). After the land bridge which took me across the lagoon, I accidentally got onto the "Thunder" trail, where even the most experienced mountain biker would have to hoist his vehicle up the uneven rocks a time or two. In fact, I could just recommend this track (or others like it) to good hikers, but consider it unfit (or grueling) for cyclers. Call me a p*ssy, but I just want to help people, who might think this is going to be like the "Mickelson," get an idea of what they're truly in for. Changing gears is a split-second affair; you'll be suddenly spinning your crankshaft on an unexpected drop, or find yourself in too high a gear for an abrupt incline. It would be madness to take your eyes from the immediate obstacles of the path, but equally foolish not to examine the upcoming treachery as well. Tired of carrying it everywhere, I determined to ride my bike up a number of these sharp rises where I was in real danger of falling over backwards (just as I was earlier of flipping over forwards). Again, I missed a sign and ended up on "Barrel Roll," which took me back down to "Wetlands Trail"! It is frustrating indeed to risk your life along a perilous "mountain bike" track, only to lose all your elevation and wind up back where you started. As it turns out, the sign - a little fenced-in cairn with a post in the middle - was completely obscured by a tree on my original route, and I went right past it. These numbered path markers (with directional signs) are helpful in that they'll show you where you are on the map, but a serious problem with the map itself is that all of the junctions and intersections are completely covered and blocked by these huge squares with the numbers in them! We need to be able to see how the trails meet and traverse one another if we're going to successfully navigate! Sometimes these absurdly placed labels conceal a suspected connection between roads, which is not actually there, or else they hide one which is. Another incidental issue is that the map - particularly the ones posted along the trails themselves - is divided into two parts, and it just so happens that the division occurs at one of the most complex and convoluted path-finding areas of the park (i.e., right beside the dam); so you're lost, and you're having to piece together two critical sections of the map like Indiana Jones in the jungle! After retracing my weary treadmarks on "Barrel Roll" I managed to find "Twenty 15" and rode the ridge out to Glendo Dam, but I was pretty low on water and had to abandon my plan to take "Narrows Bluff" to Sandy Beach (I took the main road instead). Honestly, I don't regret it though, because by then I had had enough rocky footpaths, hazardous switchbacks, frightening cliffs, projecting boulders, ruthless frame-rattling, and shadeless sand to last me quite a while. I'm 51 years old, and in fairly good shape, but I would not advise traveling this route alone if you can avoid it. Except for the folks I met at the waterless rest area, there was not a soul on this trail but me, and I repeat, it was only by God's providence that I escaped unscathed! The Park Service people were very friendly and afforded me some personal attention (answering questions beforehand, etc...). What they cannot do is alter the topography, which is what it is whether one likes it or not. Maybe the terrain north of the dam is nicer, but I wouldn't count on it. As for me, I shall stick to the less "technical" trails and the "road more traveled by."

Daniel R. Friedman

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Granny Gear

July 25, 2016
 
Review: My experience has mainly been with touring, but I recently bought a mountain bike and took it out to Lake Glendo for a camping trip. I started from the Two Moon trailhead and had a little trouble finding my way because of the lack of signage. Once across the road on "Reflector Loop" I knew right away that this was not what I had been expecting and that I was in for a difficult time. Don't get me wrong, I understand that there are some skilled MTB riders who seek out thrills like this, but in my opinion a fun bicycle ride involves being able to appreciate the scenery as well, and this was not really possible for the majority of the corridors I took. I somehow missed the turnoff for the "91 Gigawatt" trail (even though I saw the neighboring one for "Buffalo Run") and thus had to take the infamous "Root Canal." Now the adjective you will see in most of these reviews for the trails marked in red is "technical": this however is a euphemism for "threatening to life and limb"! Although most of the scattered rock had been brushed aside, there is almost continuous jutting surface rock (and some tree roots and stumps): These are often sharp and could easily cause damage to a tire or a rim (or a bone)! The way is frequently crooked and narrow, with tree branches at your elbow and cacti at your feet! I repeatedly needed to put my foot down quickly, but even this was dangerous on that irregular and tapering terrain. I suppose this is all part of the challenge for some riders, but I like to ENJOY a bicycle excursion also. It has always been my routine to rest and stretch my legs on the straight-aways and down-hills, but I had to rapidly train myself out of this habit and adopt the new practice of keeping both pedals at "half-mast"; for whenever I left a pedal at the bottom of its stroke it would get caught on a protruding rock, and it is only by the Grace of God that I was never thrown off balance by this, or by the loose sand of the several hairpin turns bordering upon the precipitous slopes of that very difficult descent. I could not afford to take my eyes off the ground for even a second lest I should find myself tumbling head over heels, and there was no soft place to land! Sometimes the trail itself became so steep that I had to be very careful not to use the front brake (or squeeze it too hard) or I might well have been thrown headlong or spilled over my own handlebars! I finally got to a ranger station at the base of the trail, next to a river, where there were restrooms, but no drinkable water. I rode along the "Wetlands" trail for a bit, and this was (for me) the only agreeable part of the course: It was paved with white gravel, and I was able to observe the foliage and fauna while relaxing for a spell (I saw some lovely purple and yellow flowers previously). After the land bridge which took me across the lagoon, I accidentally got onto the "Thunder" trail, where even the most experienced mountain biker would have to hoist his vehicle up the uneven rocks a time or two. In fact, I could just recommend this track (or others like it) to good hikers, but consider it unfit (or grueling) for cyclers. Call me a p*ssy, but I just want to help people, who might think this is going to be like the "Mickelson," get an idea of what they're truly in for. Changing gears is a split-second affair; you'll be suddenly spinning your crankshaft on an unexpected drop, or find yourself in too high a gear for an abrupt incline. It would be madness to take your eyes from the immediate obstacles of the path, but equally foolish not to examine the upcoming treachery as well. Tired of carrying it everywhere, I determined to ride my bike up a number of these sharp rises where I was in real danger of falling over backwards (just as I was earlier of flipping over forwards). Again, I missed a sign and ended up on "Barrel Roll," which took me back down to "Wetlands Trail"! It is frustrating indeed to risk your life along a perilous "mountain bike" track, only to lose all your elevation and wind up back where you started. As it turns out, the sign - a little fenced-in cairn with a post in the middle - was completely obscured by a tree on my original route, and I went right past it. These numbered path markers (with directional signs) are helpful in that they'll show you where you are on the map, but a serious problem with the map itself is that all of the junctions and intersections are completely covered and blocked by these huge squares with the numbers in them! We need to be able to see how the trails meet and traverse one another if we're going to successfully navigate! Sometimes these absurdly placed labels conceal a suspected connection between roads, which is not actually there, or else they hide one which is. Another incidental issue is that the map - particularly the ones posted along the trails themselves - is divided into two parts, and it just so happens that the division occurs at one of the most complex and convoluted path-finding areas of the park (i.e., right beside the dam); so you're lost, and you're having to piece together two critical sections of the map like Indiana Jones in the jungle! After retracing my weary treadmarks on "Barrel Roll" I managed to find "Twenty 15" and rode the ridge out to Glendo Dam, but I was pretty low on water and had to abandon my plan to take "Narrows Bluff" to Sandy Beach (I took the main road instead). Honestly, I don't regret it though, because by then I had had enough rocky footpaths, hazardous switchbacks, frightening cliffs, projecting boulders, ruthless frame-rattling, and shadeless sand to last me quite a while. I'm 51 years old, and in fairly good shape, but I would not advise traveling this route alone if you can avoid it. Except for the folks I met at the waterless rest area, there was not a soul on this trail but me, and I repeat, it was only by God's providence that I escaped unscathed! The Park Service people were very friendly and afforded me some personal attention (answering questions beforehand, etc...). What they cannot do is alter the topography, which is what it is whether one likes it or not. Maybe the terrain north of the dam is nicer, but I wouldn't count on it. As for me, I shall stick to the less "technical" trails and the "road more traveled by."

Daniel R. Friedman

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Gnarly


June 29, 2016
gregval Gnarly  
 
Review: Finally got here; been to Curt Gowdy a few times, Rode it just before Glendo.
SO, rode the south trails first day (Two moon loop, Buffalo,Gigawatt, Rattlesnake, Porcupine, Turkey Spur, Feather Rim, Slide Hill) Generally, the trails near the edges of drops have lots of surface rocks, so Two Moon and Feather, Rattlesnake. The north section of Feather Rim is particularly rocky, with small steep up/downs. Had to walk much of that section.
Rode the north section on day 2, North Bluff going north, and Toadstool coming back. The southern section of North Bluff also was close to the "edge", and had lots of surface rock, but was rideable. The northern section got into the grassy areas, and really went smooth and flowy north of intersection 16. Coming back from intersection 16, Toadstool really climbed for maybe 1/2 mile to get to the top. Then it was mostly smooth and flowy. Took Arrowhead back to finish, so don't know about the southernmost section of Toadstool.
The reservoir was about 5 feet higher than "full", so many trees were under water. Couldn't go all the way to Sandy Beach TH due to some of the trail being underwater, and a bridge was unusable.
To contrast with Curt Gowdy, CG is much more flowy, with very little surface rock to deal with. Glendo seems to have lost lots of surface dirt, which then exposed lots of rock.
SO, if you like more technical trails, you'll love Glendo. The greens and green/blue trails have very little surface rock.
This area will always be used less than Curt Gowdy, just due to its more remote location. Unless you camp, decent hotels are 30 miles away in Wheaton or Douglas.

Similar Trail: Curt Gowdy

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Epic


September 17, 2015
John Fisch Epic  
 
Review: This is a real "well, shut my mouth" trail. A 5 star trail 50 miles east of the Mountains in the middle of the prairie--whooda' thunk it? Regardless of location, Wyo State Parks has done a great job setting up an excellent variety of highly entertaining trails on the prairie and bluffs surrounding the reservoir. Whether you want fast and flowy or rocky and techy, or even a few fun man made stunts, it's all here.

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September 16, 2015
Guest   
 
Review: I am blessed to live an hour up I-25. The biking corridor coming up from the Wyo-Co line is really starting to develop. I know local allure is to keep gems hidden but we desperately need riders IMO. I ride for hours without seeing anybody most days weekends included. New areas open frequently as this area continues to develop. You can spend days and not touch the same dirt twice.

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Granny Gear

June 24, 2015
smsk8er Granny Gear  
 
Review: Great trail system. I have rode out here about 4 times now and it continues to impress. The Wyoming State Park system spent a lot of money and time on these trails and they show it. It's well marked, trails are well developed, and it's fun. I barely see anyone out riding it though, which is why I wanted to write this review. It's a drive from any proper city but your time traveling here will be well worth your time and money, and will hopefully get the state to do this to more parks. It came from the Curt Gowdy model, which IMBA lists as an EPIC ride. Get out here and check it out!

Similar Trail: Curt Gowdy State Park, WY

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Granny Gear

May 30, 2015
 
Review: Will definitely go back as they continue to build out the trails. Beautiful spot and fun, but challenging trails.

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April 23, 2015
Guest   
 
Review: 40 miles of singletrack now since 2010! Technical but not scary. Very fun!

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Glendo State Park MTB Trail 4.35 out of 5 based on 20 ratings. 20 user reviews.
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