xc racing-first timer

Tagged: , ,

Viewing 8 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #88882

      Hey Guys,
      So Im planning on entering a few XC Races this summer. Since its my first first time, i just have a few questions. Im going to include a link to the info on my rig, and both races this summer.
      -What type of padding do i wear?
      -Full Face helmet or not?
      -What othe improvements should i make on my bike?(im already planning on pedals, grips and bars)
      first race-http://www.patspeak.com/summer/bike_xcountry.php
      second race-http://www.new-hampshire.com/lions/mountain/mountain.html
      my bike-http://aroadbike4u.com/product/jamis-durango-1-2009-51839-1.htm
      thanks,
      dhforever

    • #88883

      Best upgrades you can do to that bike is a Fork and new wheels. To get a good set of wheels and nice fork, you will probably spend twice what the bike cost so I dont know if that is really worth it to you.

      I would wear just a normal helmet, a full face is not needed for XC. You also shouldn’t need any other padding unless you normally fall a lot.

    • #88884

      The best, cheap, upgrade – light, fast tires.

      And work on your motor 😉

      It’s not about the bike – it’s about fun!

    • #88885

      Having just competed in my first XC race his past weekend, I can tell you that no upgrades are going to compare to spending a couple extra hours a week training either on your bike or in the gym.

      That being said I upgraded my wheelset and fork. I spent as much on the new wheelset and fork as I did on the bike. upgrading those two things completely changed the characteristics of the bike. It is probably only a few pounds lighter, but it feels completely different on the trail. It’s much quicker and more agile.

      Another thing to try is to learn to ride with toe-clips or go clipless. For XC riding it will help you get power from your upstroke as well as keeping you attached to your bike. This is just a suggestion, clips are not necessarily for everyone, but if you like them can be a huge advantage.

    • #88886

      Thanks everyone!
      I don’t think im going to upgrade the fork and wheels soon, because i just got the bike for my birthday about a month ago. I just turned fourteen, and i do go on a bike ride every day so im just going to keep on that path, and see how it turns out. thanks again, dhforever 😃

    • #88887
      "dhforever" wrote

      Thanks everyone!
      I don’t think im going to upgrade the fork and wheels soon, because i just got the bike for my birthday about a month ago. I just turned fourteen, and i do go on a bike ride every day so im just going to keep on that path, and see how it turns out. thanks again, dhforever 😃

      Totally. Break it in first. Get used to riding trails on your new ride and enjoy it. There is no sense in upgrading something you just started getting to know. The Durango seems to be a pretty decent hard tail.

      Don’t worry too much about upgrades until your parts start to wear out. by then you may be looking at a whole new bike…

    • #88888

      Here is how Adam Craig rolls:
      Image

      Go with a decent, well vented helmet like the Giro Xen.
      Definitely get some gloves with decent padding.
      Try to learn and use clipless pedals.
      Wear spandex, not baggies, it helps for xc.

      That’s my $.02

    • #88889

      I usually have a debate with myself when thinking about racing. Do I buy a nicer, lighter fork and wheels? Or do I do some cardio and try to lose ten pounds?

      The problem is that both of those options end up costing me about the same in terms of time. Someone said work on your ‘motor.’ For an early-adopting, carbon-fiber-gearhead like me, that’s the best advice I’ve heard in awhile.

    • #88890

      race one or two times see if it’s for you before you do any up grades.

Viewing 8 reply threads

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.