What's in the backpack?

Forums Mountain Bike Forum What's in the backpack?

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This topic contains 43 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by  Jsalzman93 8 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #94839

    I am new to mountain biking. In a lot of these videos, guys are wearing backpacks(or really big water packs). What’s in the packs? Should i build a pack to take riding with me?

  • #94840

    I currently use a Camelbak Rogue with the following in it:
    70oz of water
    CO2 inflator and one cartridge
    Two Pedro’s tire levers
    Crank Bros Multi-17 tool
    Small GPS tracker
    Hammer Gel and/or other snacks
    Small ziplock bag with zip ties, velcro, a Sram powerlink and some duct tape
    A spare tube
    My car key
    Kodak Easyshare M1063 camera
    Other items as needed (2-way radio, cell phone, 1st aid items, etc)
    I can also roll up a jacket or vest and tuck it under the top flap

    The only issue I have with this setup is that my current bike has only one bottle cage, where my old bike had two and I have come a little too close to running out of water a couple of times in the desert. Fortunately, Camelbak has created the Lobo, which is almost exactly the same design as the Rogue, but with a 100oz water bladder!

  • #94841

    Thank you. That’s alot of good information. Do you take your pack on every ride or just long rides? Most of our riding has been within a mile or two of the car, but we are hoping to do some more adventerous stuff when it warms up a little. Thanks again for your feedback.

  • #94842

    every ride.

  • #94843

    I have gone out a few times without the pack on short rides and have regretted it everytime for one reason or another. I have either been thirsty or needed a specific tool or maybe just needed a place for my jacket. Now I bring it every time no matter what. I would suggest bringing it…

  • #94844

    Until recently I always rode with a 70oz camelbak. I still use it for really long rides, especially if I’m in an unfamiliar or very remote area.

    Now I’ve slimmed down what I bring with me and I can fit it all in my jersey pockets. Here’s a list: pocket 1 [tube, tire levers, crank bros multi 17 tool, quick link], pocket 2 [extra bottle if necessary, mini pump or co2], pocket 3 [cliff bars, gels, phone if necessary, car key]. If I’m not carrying the spare bottle things get shuffled around to redistribute weight. I was surprised how much better it feels to ride without a pack.

    Also, I’ve found that as I get in better shape I require a lot less water. When I wore a camelbak I tended to drink more than I needed. (When I have to stop to pee during I ride I figure I have surplus water.) Once you get a feel for how much water you actually need, you can cut back on how much you carry and save a lot of weight. Just be careful learning how much you need. Cut back gradually and pay attention to your body.

  • #94845

    I’m with them…every ride is a must. As you ride more and more you will begin to realize what exactly you need in your pack.

  • #94846

    A camelbak is helps protect your back a little if you crash. It’s not armor by any means, but it helps.

  • #94847

    I ride without my camelbak on shorter rides. I can carry two bottles on the bike, and I always have a small saddlebag on the bike to carry the essentials. In the bag I keep a tube, co2, minitool, and tire levers. I keep my bike pretty well maintained, and it’s a single speed, so there’s not much to break on it.

    But for longer rides, anything over two hours (less if it’s hot) I take the pack.

  • #94848

    I’m an old guy and I’ve been ridin’ for 5 or 6 years and very seldom use my Camelback but I would advise at least having one for long trips. I usually do the same thing with the saddle bag. CO2, tube, chain break, tire tools, patch kit. Carry my gels and extra bottle of water in my jersey and one on the bike. Another thing I do when I want to do 4 or 5 hours is if possible I park my car in a place where I can just do several long loops out and back near the car so I can get more water and food there if needed. Again, though, the pack is a good thing to have especially if you are going to be in pretty remote country.

  • #94849

    Whenever I go out on a ride I take a pack, 70-100 oz bladder…I have both and pretty much the same as what ever other person on here packs. I have also found that I end up using things from my pack to help others on the trail that decided they didn’t need a pack or extra water or a quick snack. I am already over 200 pds riding so I don’t mind a few extra pds riding around on my back. I wound rather be prepared then push my bike out to my truck. I like being the guy in the group that just might have what you need when you ride with me…

  • #94850
    "dgaddis" wrote

    I ride without my camelbak on shorter rides. I can carry two bottles on the bike, and I always have a small saddlebag on the bike to carry the essentials. In the bag I keep a tube, co2, minitool, and tire levers. I keep my bike pretty well maintained, and it’s a single speed, so there’s not much to break on it.

    But for longer rides, anything over two hours (less if it’s hot) I take the pack.

    Were those last two comments questions for me??? I would say that I have ridden about 10 hours locally(5 rides about 2 hours each). I haven’t done any trail work, but would like to get involved. I just have no idea how to find out about it. I figure, eventually I’ll run in to someone on the trail that has some information.

  • #94851
    "tdbgwl" wrote

    [quote="dgaddis":3q00fxp3]I ride without my camelbak on shorter rides. I can carry two bottles on the bike, and I always have a small saddlebag on the bike to carry the essentials. In the bag I keep a tube, co2, minitool, and tire levers. I keep my bike pretty well maintained, and it’s a single speed, so there’s not much to break on it.

    But for longer rides, anything over two hours (less if it’s hot) I take the pack.

    Were those last two comments questions for me??? I would say that I have ridden about 10 hours locally(5 rides about 2 hours each). I haven’t done any trail work, but would like to get involved. I just have no idea how to find out about it. I figure, eventually I’ll run in to someone on the trail that has some information.[/quote:3q00fxp3]
    😆 That is his signature. Like mine is, "If you have to get off the bike you’re doing it wrong."

  • #94852

    I’m just starting out but something that I learned from what little experience that I have is to put your tools in a saddlebag. I tried to carry all of in in a backpack but what I found was that I would unload everything at the end of the day and they may not get back in there for the next ride. So, I started putting everything I could in a saddlebag and leaving it in there. I haven’t left a tool behind since and I now have more room for snacks and water, and that’s always a plus. Btw, I don’t have a very large saddlebag but I do have a lot in it. Tube, patch kit, CO2 inflator, small med kit, Topeak Alien II multi-tool, tire levers, chain links, and (once I’m riding)keys. Foodstuffs go in the pack.

  • #94853

    Umm, you can’t leave the tools in the backpack the same as you do the saddlebag?

  • #94854

    He probably uses the backpack for things besides mountain biking. I use mine for snowboarding. I have the same problem with the duffel-type bag I use to carry bike gear. I also use it for short trips or the non-biking variety and its a pain to repack all the bike stuff afterwards. A separate bike bag would be ideal, but the money for that hasn’t appeared yet…

  • #94855

    heh, my bike stuff stays in my camelbak, even if I take it hiking, and I have some old duffel bag I got at a trade show years ago that is for biking stuff only. Regular use stuff just stays in there.

  • #94856

    Former saddle bag user here. Former due to the large number of times I would look down and see that it had opened up and slowly dumped my stuff along the trail. Tried two separate saddle bags with the same results. Never had that issue with either of my camelbaks.

  • #94857

    I also have a saddle bag (for CO2 and 2nd tube on longer rides) and its zipper ends in the ‘down’ position. It has never come open on me.

  • #94858

    I’d like to be able to leave everything in a backpack but LIke dchaney389 said I use it for other things. It’s the only small backpack I own and I use it for class. I’m looking at getting one of those really big Camelbaks, the one with a lot of extra room, but until I can afford it and I get the rest of my safety gear it’s on the back burners. As far as my saddle bag opening on me, I’ve never had it open on its own, and I keep it fairly well packed. And when you consider how much I fall, its been doing a pretty good job of it.

  • #94859

    I hear ya there.

    Take a hard look at the Lobo when you get ready. It’s not huge but it’s super well laid out, holds 100oz of water and you can fill it without removing the bladder.

  • #94860

    This is what I carry in my Fox hydration pack. 70 oz resevior, crank brox 17 multi tool, Co2 cartridge, Small first aid, TP, patches, tube, knife, shot blox, clif bars, arm warmers, keys, cell phone, and ID. Occasionally a camera and a extra layer depending on the conditions.

    Never tried a saddlebag but might not be a good idea with my drop seat post. I sometimes carry a water bottle on the frame.

    I do not find this to be all that heavy or even bothersome. I typically carry it on all my rides, unless its around the block by my house. I feel that if I didn’t something might go wrong and I prefer not to deal with that.

  • #94861

    Hey Thanks for the tip. I’ll be looking into that one. Most that I see around here are hydration only, without much if any storage.

  • #94862
    "GoldenGoose" wrote

    Former saddle bag user here. Former due to the large number of times I would look down and see that it had opened up and slowly dumped my stuff along the trail. Tried two separate saddle bags with the same results. Never had that issue with either of my camelbaks.

    Same happened to me…

    I have a Camelback Blowfish with bladder, bontrager 17 multitool, tube, extra tire levers, mech. bike pump, knife, gels, lighter, headlamp, camera, phone, and ID.

  • #94863

    Its a dilemma when deciding how to carry stuff when out riding!

    Hydration Bag – carries all the stuff you need & don’t interfere with your riding if you got a good bag & packed it well. But just for a short rumble through the neighborhood, the backpack doesn’t make any sense.

    Saddle Bag – Keeps your back cool & stores your essential. But there is always the nagging fear that it unzips itself or loop itself off the seat rail!

    Fanny pack – Always on you, no fear of dislodging without your notice. But can get hot & bothersome.

    Storage Bottle – Keeps essential stuff & is water-proof but monopolize one bottle cage.

    So you see, I have yet to find the ONE that stores them all!

  • #94864

    Thanks for the heads up on the signatures at the bottom. I guess that shows off how tech savvy I am. 😆

  • #94865

    No worries tdbqwl! My signature is just a reminder that we should all spend some time on the trails with a tool instead of a bike every now and then 😃

    If you really do want to get involved with your local advocacy group, I can help you find out who that is. You’ll learn a lot from those folks, meet new people to ride with, and earn some positive trail karma – all good things! What town/state do you live in?

    EDIT: Back on topic…I’ve been lucky w/my saddlebags. Haven’t had one come open on me. I’m using one made my Serfas right now I think. Sometime’s it’s hard to get it open, but at least it stays closed! I use the saddle bag because I have 3 different hydration packs, and I use them all regularly, so I don’t want to worry about moving the essentials every time I switch bags.

    The little 50oz bag is great for when I need more water than I can carry on the frame, but it doesn’t have any extra storage space for tools, jacket, etc. It’s light and doesn’t cover much of my back, so it’s a little cooler. I use it for local rides not too far from the car and at some races.

    The 70oz North Face bag carries a little more water, and has some storage space, I use it most often. And the 100oz HAWG will carry a ton of extra gear/clothes/food/etc. So for big epic rides with no pit stops, this is my go to bag. I’ve also used to bikepacking and loaded it down with 13lbs of gear!

  • #94866

    FIRST OFF, GREAT TOPIC!
    I PRETTY MUCH CARRY THE SAME STUFF IN MY PACK AS EVERYONE ELSE,
    PATCH KIT, TIRE LEVER, SPARE TUBE, CO2 PUMP WITH CARTRIDGE, MULIT-TOOL,SRAM QUICK LINK, MINI FIRST AID, EXTRA GLOVES, A COUPLE DOLLAR BILLS, CHANGE, CELL PHONE, ID AND OFCOURSE SNACKS AND H2O 70oz BUT I CAN FIT 100oz.
    NOW DEPENDING ON WHERE I AM RIDING, THAT DETERMINES THE PACK I USE CUS I HAVE 3 DIFFRENT PACKS THAT VARY IN SIZE. I HAVE ONE FOR BIKEPACKING, ONE FOR LONG 6+ HOUR RIDES AND MY LOCAL PACK FOR ANYTHING UNDER 6 WHICH IS A HIGH SIERRA FROM COSTCO WHICH IS ALMOST IDENTICAL TO THE CAMELBACK MULE EXCEPT FOR THE PRICE. 😃
    OFCOURSE IF I WILL BE RIDING FAR FROM HOME AND THE CAR I CARRY A SPARE TIRE, SHOCK PUMP, 2 TUBES, RAIN JACKET( I LIVE IN CO..LOL), CHAIN LUBE, SPARE DERAILLEUR CABLE AND I THINK THATS IT.
    I ALSO NOTICED THE TALK ABOUT SADDLE BAGS, I DONT CARRY ONE BUT I HAVE ONE ON MY WIFES’ BIKE SO THAT SHE DOESNT HAVE TO CARRY SO MUCH IN HER PACK CAUSE HER CAMELBACK IS SMALL WITH ONLY ONE POCKET. IT HAS NEVER OPENED UP ON ANY RIDE…
    I HAVE TO AGREE THAT THE PACK HAS CUSHOINED WHAT COULD HAVE BEEN SOME HARD HITS TO THE BACK ON SEVERAL OCCASION. OH YEAH, I ALSO CARRY MY KNEE PADS DEPENDING ON WHERE I GO RIDE…

  • #94867

    A first aid kit is a good idea. I have one with me all the time now after having to walk out of the trail with my shirt wrapped around my leg to hold a 4 inch (bone deep) cut on my shin closed. My cell phone came in handy too, as I was no where near my car.

  • #94868

    Yeah a good first aid kit is a must. Mine doesn’t have much but I do have some essentials. Band aids, medic tape, gauze, aspirin, electrolyte tabs, antibiotic creme. They all fit in a plastic bag, in my saddlebag along side my tools and other equipment. I’ve made splints out of sticks and whatever else I could find. I also keep a bigger, more intensive medic bag in my car that can handle almost anything except surgeries and spine injuries.

  • #94869

    You guys are making me a little nervous, 😮 talking about bone deep gashes and splints. What am I getting myself into???

  • #94870
    "maddslacker" wrote

    A camelbak is helps protect your back a little if you crash. It’s not armor by any means, but it helps.

    X2, more than once I was glad to have it, I also find a camera will find the rock and protect you also.. DO’H!!

  • #94871

    I also find a camera will find the rock and protect you also.. DO’H!![/quote]

    yup, I cracked my wifes lcd sceen on her camera going over the bars, it kept my leg from hitting the rock…lol 😃

  • #94872
    "tdbgwl" wrote

    You guys are making me a little nervous, 😮 talking about bone deep gashes and splints. What am I getting myself into???

    A hell of a lotta fun! The pain just makes it better…lol

  • #94873

    Good point about somebody else needing the first aid kit. I go riding with my boys and they are far more…….adventurous. The bad part is, I’ll still get stuck with the medical bills. 😮

  • #94874
    "tdbgwl" wrote

    Good point about somebody else needing the first aid kit. I go riding with my boys and they are far more…….adventurous. The bad part is, I’ll still get stuck with the medical bills. 😮

    My parents give me crap about that… But I tell ’em, it keeps my off the streets and out of trouble! Also, ever since I started biking, I can’t sit and play video games for more than an hour a day… I don’t even know the last time I turned my xbox on…. 😏

  • #94875

    Well…. I got the Rogue. It’s working out great. I’ve been riding with it a few times and…. it’s not that heavy, it’s plenty of water for me, and it’s got good storage space.

    I went riding at Chicasaw Trace this past weekend in Columbia, TN. I did two laps (8.25mi laps), the farthest I’ve ridden in one trip so far, and I still had lots of water left when I was done. I put my phone, keys, and snacks in the bag and had plenty of storage room left (I got an under the seat bag for my tools and parts). It was kind of cool and windy, so I started out in a light jacket and came out of it after I rode just a little bit, and the pack also accommodated my jacket nicely.

    Thanks for all the tips and advice. I am very happy with my purchase.

    P.S. The trail was awsome. It was in great shape, not wet nor debris. There were a few climbs that were a little much for my beginner skill set and a few technical spots. Overall it’s a good ride and a great challenge for beginners.

  • #94876

    In my Dakine Nomad I have the following.
    100oz Bladder
    Park Tools Multi-Tool
    Mini-Pump
    Spare Tube
    Patch Kit
    Rolled up Duct Tape
    Electrical Tape
    Zip Ties
    4 Pack Single use Crazy Glue (for cuts)
    First-Aid Kit
    100% Deet Mini Spray
    Sting/Bite/Itch Relief Mini-Spray
    Flashlight
    Whistle
    Phone, ID, Car Key

  • #94877
    "Rmontgo21" wrote

    In my Dakine Nomad I have the following
    100% Deet Mini Spray
    Sting/Bite/Itch Relief Mini-Spray

    If I had to guess, you must live in down south or southeast….lol

  • #94878

    Northeast lol. Ticks are already out!!

  • #94879

    I do NOT miss the mosquitoes and black flies from back there.

  • #94880
    "Rmontgo21" wrote

    Northeast lol. Ticks are already out!!

    man thats gotta suck

  • #94881
    "BUDDAH" wrote

    [quote="Rmontgo21":3irpoxmo]In my Dakine Nomad I have the following
    100% Deet Mini Spray
    Sting/Bite/Itch Relief Mini-Spray

    If I had to guess, you must live in down south or southeast….lol[/quote:3irpoxmo]

    From someone who has lived in New England and now in Georgia, I do not suffer from the blackflies and mosquitos like I used to. Now snakes that is another story……..

  • #94882

    Hey I just got the Fox portage. It came with a 100oz hydropak, a big compartment and then another smaller one for maybe a porta-pump and some tubes. Also it has a Fleece lines smaller pocket maybe 5”x8” for sunglasses or cameras. Two full zip side pockets and a mesh spot to hold the helmet (probably the best feature because id loose that along with my head if it wasnt screwed on!) great cushy and meshy back to it!
    Also just to add because im STOKED to have gotten these, i got these knee pads that are amazing. They are called G-Form Knee pads and they are perfect for XC. they are a soft foam pad sewn to a compression like sleeve. they are good for the "OH NO!" zero velocity fall. they are super light weight and very breathable! check em out! http://www.g-form.com

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