What problems do you have?

Forums Mountain Bike Forum What problems do you have?

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    • #88077

      Hi, i’m new to this site and i’m going to be honest from the off.
      I do not mountain bike. You’re probably thinking so why sign up? Well, i’m here to try to gain a bit more of an insight into the sport for a current project i have undertaken. I’m studying Industry Design in the UK at university.
      The project title is simply, ‘Mountain bike Accessory’. Now to you this may spring all sorts of thoughts and ideas to mind but for a complete novice like me there is nothing but those words floating around my head ‘mountain bike accesssory’.

      I have been reading through many of the blogs posted on this website, which i must say, are extremely well written and informative, but they were based on new products/ accessorys which only seemed to narrow my search even more.

      As an eery starting point i figured that if i found out what problems are encountered in the sport then maybe i stand a chance of coming up with a solution. Sounds like a good idea 😛?

      So basically i’m asking you, the mountain biker, to post your reply to unsolved problems that you have encountered whilst out on trails. This can range from materials to mechainsms, comfort, clothing, ergonomics. Anything!

      Thanks in advance for any support or advice given, i really appreciate it.

      regards, mikenuk.

    • #88078

      Well as a start, a thread that was started last year kind of touched on what people thought to be annoying.

      http://www.singletracks.com/forum2/viewtopic.php?t=3043

      You will see a lot of people find the same things to be a continuous problem. I think trash was the #1 bane of the trails. Though this doesn’t address the problems other than the trails themselves. So you won’t find the physical accessory per se.

    • #88079
      "Mikenuk" wrote

      As an eery starting point i figured that if i found out what problems are encountered in the sport then maybe i stand a chance of coming up with a solution. Sounds like a good idea 😛?

      I highly doubt you will be able to make a difference of any sort unless you are a legitimate mountain biker. Some things are tough to explain, and people outside the sport seldom understand the obsession that we hold.

      My overall annoyance with bike parts is due to the fact that they all wear out. I want parts that cost less, are lighter, more durable on impact and longer lasting. Can you do better than what the best engineers currently in the bike industry are doing? If so, then sign me up!

    • #88080

      Cool project. The parameters seem to be a bit wide but I hope you will be able to gather enough info to put together something focused and informative.

      Over the last dozen years or so this sport has evolved at an incredible rate, and most of the accessories right along with it. The more intricate bikes get with every model opens the doors to several new parts & accessories markets. Parts are lighter, more effective, more durable than they were over 10 years ago. (A lot of the bikes we had 10 years ago didn’t need these kinds of parts.) But they are surely more expensive and do wear out. Some brands a LOT faster than others.

      So here is an example for your study, Ill pick the clothing category. This could apply to a lot of other accessories too but this is an easy example. Here is one of my findings from riding the last ten years; Im going to use Fox just because they are a very recognizable brand, although there are many other top brands out there. Fox makes some of the highest quality and best working shorts and jerseys on the market today. Some might say they set a standard that other companies strive to attain. But they are expensive. Are they worth the price? That is up to the individual rider, some of their products I say yes, they are very well worth it. The issue I have run up into is this; underneath Fox (or other top brand) there is a plethora of companies that manufacture products that are half the quality of the Fox item, or less even. However the prices on brand 2 are just a couple bucks below the price set for the Fox item, knowing that the consumer will buy theirs if that Fox tag is just a little too high for whatever reason. These prices could be from the company but I think the retailers themselves have a lot to do with this.
      Its all a buyer beware scenario, and individual choices. My purchasing habits have become this- If I cant afford (or cant find) the Fox jersey I want, I will not spend almost as much on brand 2. Ive learned its more practical to go over to the department store and buy a $14 jersey off their rack than spend the high bucks for brand 2 that is just about the same quality. Yes it will wear out faster than the Fox brand jersey, but Im only out a couple bucks and can still afford the Fox when I find it.

      Like I said, this scenario may apply to a lot of different accessory categories, this is just one Ive dealt with recently. Good luck with your project.

    • #88081
      "Goo" wrote

      I highly doubt you will be able to make a difference of any sort unless you are a legitimate mountain biker. Some things are tough to explain, and people outside the sport seldom understand the obsession that we hold.

      My overall annoyance with bike parts is due to the fact that they all wear out. I want parts that cost less, are lighter, more durable on impact and longer lasting. Can you do better than what the best engineers currently in the bike industry are doing? If so, then sign me up!

      I totally disagree with part of what you replied. I’m not asking whether or not you think i’m capable of achieving anything productive/beneficial, I’m asking purely for information. I have no choice in the project outline, i have to do it.

      What you touched on a bout parts wearing out is another starting point, if not for a final project then for research alone. For that i’m greatful and i thank you for your help. If you could spare a little more time and just post the top 5 parts, for e.g, that do wear frequently then i’ll look into them myself leaving you without having to explain anything.

      Also thankyou Dan for your post, again it has helped a lot.

    • #88082

      I’m a slow climber. That’s about my only problem.

      Oh, and I have too many hobbies to spend money on, definitely a problem there.

      And, my knees hurt.

      All joking aside, I think one of the biggest problems in MTB today is compatibility and cost.

      Compatibility in that there are many competing standards. I suppose this is a byproduct of innovation, but damn it would be nice if picking out a crankset, hub type, brake type, etc was simpler.

      Costs have gone up a lot too. Nowadays, forks, shocks, wheelsets, etc cater to both the top and bottom end of the market (Sub $200 and Over $800) and there is very little mid-range (although this is getting better). I think a lot of this is marketing driven. Plenty of people want and need usable, light gear but don’t have $3000 to spend on parts for their bike overhaul. I paid $2000 for my whole bike two years ago, and a lot of the components are on the lower end, it’s a hard sell to spend all that extra money, I’d like to gain some performance, but more than doubling what I spent on the original bike? Damn.

    • #88083

      One of the more frustrating items I have dealt with in mountain biking is hydration packs. There are lots of them out there and there may be some that hold up well, at least better than the ones I have used. The pack part itself always holds up well, but the water resevoir and attached plumbing is where I have my trouble. I don’t think I have ever gotten a full year out of one without it spewing a leak somewhere. Sometimes its the mouthpiece bit area, other times its another connection or the resevoir lid not sealing. Maybe I am just hard on them. Nothing like having cold water dripping down onto your leg in December. You can buy replacement reservoirs from Camelback, but I’ve had some of the same issues with them and at $20 or so, you are already close to half price of a total new unit.

    • #88084
      One of the more frustrating items I have dealt with in mountain biking is hydration packs. There are lots of them out there and there may be some that hold up well, at least better than the ones I have used. The pack part itself always holds up well, but the water resevoir and attached plumbing is where I have my trouble. I don’t think I have ever gotten a full year out of one without it spewing a leak somewhere. Sometimes its the mouthpiece bit area, other times its another connection or the resevoir lid not sealing. Maybe I am just hard on them. Nothing like having cold water dripping down onto your leg in December. You can buy replacement reservoirs from Camelback, but I’ve had some of the same issues with them and at $20 or so, you are already close to half price of a total new unit.

      Camelbak’s have lifetime warranties and if you call them up and send in the old one they send a new one for shipping cost, or you can bring to you LBS where you got it and get a new one for free. at least thats what i have done.

    • #88085
      "ChiliPepper" wrote

      [quote="Goo":uug4isek][quote="Mikenuk":uug4isek]
      As an eery starting point i figured that if i found out what problems are encountered in the sport then maybe i stand a chance of coming up with a solution. Sounds like a good idea 😛?

      I highly doubt you will be able to make a difference of any sort unless you are a legitimate mountain biker. Some things are tough to explain, and people outside the sport seldom understand the obsession that we hold.

      My overall annoyance with bike parts is due to the fact that they all wear out. I want parts that cost less, are lighter, more durable on impact and longer lasting. Can you do better than what the best engineers currently in the bike industry are doing? If so, then sign me up![/quote:uug4isek]
      So true, so true. Goo hit it right on the center of the nail. Good answer bro! 😃[/quote:uug4isek]

      Thanks man! 😃

    • #88086
      "Mikenuk" wrote

      [quote="Goo":2m1uwdae]

      I highly doubt you will be able to make a difference of any sort unless you are a legitimate mountain biker. Some things are tough to explain, and people outside the sport seldom understand the obsession that we hold.

      My overall annoyance with bike parts is due to the fact that they all wear out. I want parts that cost less, are lighter, more durable on impact and longer lasting. Can you do better than what the best engineers currently in the bike industry are doing? If so, then sign me up!

      I totally disagree with part of what you replied. I’m not asking whether or not you think i’m capable of achieving anything productive/beneficial, I’m asking purely for information. I have no choice in the project outline, i have to do it.

      What you touched on a bout parts wearing out is another starting point, if not for a final project then for research alone. For that i’m greatful and i thank you for your help. If you could spare a little more time and just post the top 5 parts, for e.g, that do wear frequently then i’ll look into them myself leaving you without having to explain anything.

      Also thankyou Dan for your post, again it has helped a lot.[/quote:2m1uwdae]

      1. Make a chain that can take 3,000 miles of riding in damp, muddy conditions, without lube, and not stretch more than maybe 2 mm.
      2. Tires that are lighter, and can again go 3,000 miles and only lose 25% of their tread
      3. Grips that I can ride for 3 years and have them only begin to show wear.
      4. A derailleur that can be crashed into a rock at 30 mph and be a straight as the day it was manufactured.
      5. A fork whose seals never need replacing and never leak oil.

      All of this for less money than we currently pay for our parts.

    • #88087
      "Goo" wrote

      [quote="Mikenuk":1srqcemt][quote="Goo":1srqcemt]

      1. Make a chain that can take 3,000 miles of riding in damp, muddy conditions, without lube, and not stretch more than maybe 2 mm.
      2. Tires that are lighter, and can again go 3,000 miles and only lose 25% of their tread
      3. Grips that I can ride for 3 years and have them only begin to show wear.
      4. A derailleur that can be crashed into a rock at 30 mph and be a straight as the day it was manufactured.
      5. A fork whose seals never need replacing and never leak oil.

      All of this for less money than we currently pay for our parts.

      [/quote:1srqcemt][/quote:1srqcemt]

      this sounds to me like the perfect bike if you add in not needing adjustments ever, and cables that dont wear out/stretch/get gunk in the housing. more of that and less of $$$

    • #88088
      "FBTrek321" wrote

      [quote="Goo":83evj802][quote="Mikenuk":83evj802][quote="Goo":83evj802]

      1. Make a chain that can take 3,000 miles of riding in damp, muddy conditions, without lube, and not stretch more than maybe 2 mm.
      2. Tires that are lighter, and can again go 3,000 miles and only lose 25% of their tread
      3. Grips that I can ride for 3 years and have them only begin to show wear.
      4. A derailleur that can be crashed into a rock at 30 mph and be a straight as the day it was manufactured.
      5. A fork whose seals never need replacing and never leak oil.

      All of this for less money than we currently pay for our parts.

      this sounds to me like the perfect bike if you add in not needing adjustments ever, and cables that dont wear out/stretch/get gunk in the housing. more of that and less of $$$[/quote:83evj802][/quote:83evj802][/quote:83evj802]

      😃 😃 Yep we’re thinking along the same lines!!

    • #88089
      "Goo" wrote

      1. Make a chain that can take 3,000 miles of riding in damp, muddy conditions, without lube, and not stretch more than maybe 2 mm.
      2. Tires that are lighter, and can again go 3,000 miles and only lose 25% of their tread
      3. Grips that I can ride for 3 years and have them only begin to show wear.
      4. A derailleur that can be crashed into a rock at 30 mph and be a straight as the day it was manufactured.
      5. A fork whose seals never need replacing and never leak oil.

      I the Gates Carbon Drive system *might* come close to your #1, though it’s single speed only AFAIK.

      I’d add to your #4 and say a derailleur that never needs adjustment. Set it and forget it. Are you listening Ron Popeil? 😀

      I’m personally not too concerned about #2 or #3 since tires and grips are fairly inexpensive and easy to replace. But yeah, it would be nice to have a bike that just works and needs zero maintenance…

    • #88090

      With the carbon drive you could alway try and get a Rohlof gear hub or the Sram version? then your at 7 gears+..
      All the gears are internal so no mess..

    • #88091
      "element22" wrote

      With the carbon drive you could alway try and get a Rohlof gear hub or the Sram version? then your at 7 gears+..
      All the gears are internal so no mess..

      How would the weight and expense compare to a normal set up?

      And 7 gears is still 20 gears short of 27…

    • #88092

      true on what your saying but look at the now 2X10…People make fine on that. And if your really looking of those 20 your using maybe 12 of those all the time.

      Even on my AM bike I ditched the large ring in favor for a bash and then I am using only 8 gear outta the bunch.

    • #88093

      Thanks so much for all your input its really helpful. I’m looking to go mountain biking in the next couples of weeks so i should get a better hands on experience. Once again, thank you for your posts so far.

      Regards, mikenuk

    • #88094
      "Goo" wrote

      [quote="Mikenuk":335hbm1e][quote="Goo":335hbm1e]

      1. Make a chain that can take 3,000 miles of riding in damp, muddy conditions, without lube, and not stretch more than maybe 2 mm.
      [/quote:335hbm1e][/quote:335hbm1e]

      damn, is it really that much a nuisance to lube your chain every once in a while? haha

      To the OP, I’ve got your accessory. Create a device that attaches to the front of any bike. It functions almost like a snow plow and is used to smash through slower riders that refuse to let you pass. But, it has to weigh less than 1500 grams and is non lethal.

    • #88095

      The thing that comes to my mind was security based, firstly i find it difficult to find a decent place to lock my bike up. When i do find a shelter its not really well designed. I emailed the mayor about it and got the usual rehearsed paragraph. I usually have to use 3 or 4 locks and the typical n shaped bar/random piece of metal aka lamp post.

      The other thought was finding a small self contained GPS tracker, all the ones available here (UK)are designed for things with massive 12V batteries, cars motorbikes.

      For the off road part of me i think storage on a bike is usually restricted to saddle, bars and frame. but most of the items are designed for a standard triangle frame and not my FSR XC and often interfere with something. However the on bike storage is usually only needed for the copious amount of bike locks.

      There are my thoughts

    • #88096

      JDH

      If someone were to make a difference in MTB’ing to increase the quality of bikes, parts, clothing and warranty’s they would need to start a testing program, a true high quality testing system that manufacturers would have to submit to prior to the release of new products. Something along the lines of Underwriters Laboratory.

    • #88097

      There is a lot of good info on this thread.. To The Author…

      Mountain biking is a dirty sport. It is a sport that abuses the equipment and the rider. On Purpose. Why? Because we like it that way!

      As mentioned before, today’s technology is far advanced from just a few years ago, and it is advancing exponentially. Yes prices are going up for the new technology and we all want the cool new stuff, but if you look at the lower cost stuff today compared to 5 years ago the durability is up and the weight is down, Basically you get more bang for your buck but you may spend more bucks.

      So (In my opinion) to answer your question the the problems typically settle around being able to perform at a very high level (or higher than your riding buddies) on equipment that will take the abuse, keep you safe and last forever. In short… We want a Tank that goes really fast uphill AND downhill, only weighs 10 pounds, will last forever and only costs 100 bucks! So what’s the big deal?

      Oh one more thing. You have to look cool too! 😆

    • #88098

      The biggest issue with mountainbiking, and to a lesser extent, all biking, is that there is always something between your legs ready to crush your nuts if you make the slightest mistake… Now, invent a bike that you can ride side-saddle, and you’d have something all of us can appreciate… well, us guys anyway.

    • #88099
      "INDIANADAVE" wrote

      The biggest issue with mountainbiking, and to a lesser extent, all biking, is that there is always something between your legs ready to crush your nuts if you make the slightest mistake… Now, invent a bike that you can ride side-saddle, and you’d have something all of us can appreciate… well, us guys anyway.

      Someone has already taken care of that problem.

      Bike shorts.

      Buy some, and see the light.

    • #88100

      Yea. I know… I am looing at some actually. That thin pad might help some, but if there wasn’t a bike between your legs in the first place…This was just in good humor anyway…

    • #88101
      "eric-29er" wrote

      Mountain biking is a dirty sport. It is a sport that abuses the equipment and the rider. On Purpose. Why? Because we like it that way!

      I don’t know if my body can take the abuse like it used to. 30, 40 years ago, I used to do some crazy a$$ stuff on my bike back in the day, and lived to tell about it. Now that I’m older, wiser, a little touch of gray, 30 lbs heavier, etc… and I’m hesitant to try advanced trails.

      Right now the problem I have is hesitation, apprehension, [i:ly6cqw5o]"…should I? …shouldn’t I? "[/i:ly6cqw5o] when I come upon a nasty section of a trail. I end up hitting the brakes, slowing way down, and not having enough speed to make it through.

      To you younger (20-something) guys out there: Don’t call me a wuss. I’m probably the same age as your dad. 😛

    • #88102
      "ChiliPepper" wrote

      Ha! Ha! Ha! No offense ‘dgaddis’, but I would like to know how bike shorts are going to help with "Nut Crush" brother. I have been riding for a while now, from XC to the meanest FR/DH, and I have nor anyone else has found any cure for nut crush besides not riding. I have heard of wearing a nut cup, but come on, that will not fly in MTB’ing.

      About the only way to help in the "Nut Crush" scenario in regards to the saddle, is to mount one of those giant granny saddles, you know, the ones that are wide load with big ole springs. 😆 😆 😆

      I’m talking about just normal riding. A good pair of shorts, either lycra or a baggie w/a liner, will keep your boys tucked up and out of harms way. Ever been moving around on the bike a lot, and had one drop between the nose of the saddle and your leg? 😮 OUCH. Bike shorts keep that sort of thing from happening.

      Your boy parts shouldn’t be hurting from just riding. There should be no pain or numbness. If there is, there’s something wrong with your saddle positioning, and you need to get that fixed ASAP.

      Only slightly off topic, but something newbies may be concerned about, is a bit of ‘shrinkage’ is normal after a ride. Your body is sending more blood to the muscle you worked out (your legs, which has the largest muscles in your body), and that blood had to come from somewhere. We all know what more blood to that area does, so it’s not hard to imagine how less blood would have the opposite effect.

      As far as just slamming them into stuff (stem, top tube, saddle, rear tire, etc) you just gotta handle that on your own, species survival instincts should be kicking in there 😆

    • #88103

      JDH

      When it comes to bike shorts PLEASE remember that darker colors are the key when wearing Lycra tight shorts! Or just go with lined baggy shorts PLEASE!!! 😆

    • #88104
      "JDH" wrote

      When it comes to bike shorts PLEASE remember that darker colors are the key when wearing Lycra tight shorts! Or just go with lined baggy shorts PLEASE!!! 😆

      Just go baggy! 😬

    • #88105
      "JDH" wrote

      When it comes to bike shorts PLEASE remember that darker colors are the key when wearing Lycra tight shorts! Or just go with lined baggy shorts PLEASE!!! 😆

      I rock the baggies with internal support (either chamois or a wicking athletic boxer brief). Seriously folks, nobody wants to see that stuff. Put some pants on!

      To the original poster: I’ll tell you what my problem is right now. Due to weather and work, I didn’t get my ride in last night. And now I am depressed and cranky. So, my suggestion is that your project should focus on how to ensure that work and weather will NEVER interfere with riding. Thanks; lookin’ forward to your solution.

    • #88106
      "fleetwood" wrote

      [quote="JDH":rhliaafk]
      To the original poster:

      [/quote:rhliaafk]

      I think i’m still most concerned with indestructible components for free. My bike is currently out of commission, and I don’t have enough $$ to fix it.

      But just sending a check would help too.

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