using music notes to tune spokes

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    • #125672

      It’s not using the spoke sound to find out how much you need to tune it, but there’s is a website where you put in what type and how long your spoke is and calculates what note means you spoke is at the right tension. What are your thoughts? Is it trustworthy to use notes?

      Cavermatthew

    • #125673
      "cavermatthew" wrote

      It’s not using the spoke sound to find out how much you need to tune it, but there’s is a website where you put in what type and how long your spoke is and calculates what note means you spoke is at the right tension. What are your thoughts? Is it trustworthy to use notes?

      Cavermatthew

      That’s how Easton tensions their spokes in the factory.

    • #125674

      "Tension by tone" is VERY useful for achieving tension balance, making sure all of the spokes on each side of the wheel are at the same tension – they should all make approximately the same tone when plucked like a guitar string. I do this with every wheel I build since it’s way faster than using a tension meter to check each and every spoke.

      However, I always use the tension meter to see what the actual tension is, I’ll check a few spokes to make sure they are where they need to be, then go around the wheel listening to the spokes to check the tension balance.

      I imagine (though haven’t confirmed) that you can’t simply say "spoke A at Bmm long makes note C at tension D" because the tone will change based on the other components in the system. Nipple material, rim material, number of spokes, lacing pattern, hub, etc.

      Wheel companies that build thousands of the same combinations (like Easton) it makes total sense to do all the tensioning by tone, once they build one wheel they can figure out what the exact tone is, then build to that tone on all the future builds of that particular model.

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