upgrade which component first?

Forums Mountain Bike Forum upgrade which component first?

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  pinkmtb 9 years ago.

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  • #92681

    Hey,
    Started Mtbing, xc about 6mos ago after I bought a Giant Rincon. My co-riders’ bikes are much lighter and their skills are much more advanced but for the most part I almost keep up with them. I first need to say I am hooked. I would ride every day if I could. I have to be careful not to break the bank with upgrades cause it’s very addicting, (shopping online for upgrades). I don’t want to spend way above my skill level but I don’t want to buy something and find out 6mos later that I could have spent a little more and ended up with a lot more. Ok, well that’s the intro. Now for my question which is twofold. Which components should I consider upgrading first? And, where can I go to learn more about parts? There is so much to know. Example: Forks. How much travel? What do all those terms mean? I am the type who really researches something, but I have still made mistakes. I don’t want to waste my money, who does? Help, and I appreciate it!

  • #92682

    Welcome to the sport/addiction!!!
    My recommendation would be to NOT upgrade your bike heavily. I’d say go for new tires, a new saddle if needed, switch grips out, etc… but just the small stuff. It sounds like you’ve had some fun with your bike, which looks like a good starter bike, and that’s the purpose of it… to get you into the sport and let you see how serious you are! Sounds like mission accomplished!! 😃
    If you are serious about riding I’d say your money is better invested in a higher end bike with better components. Look at the trails you are riding, the type of riding you are most interested in, what you want to get out of the sport and research higher end bikes that fit your needs. That would be my advice at least.

  • #92683
    "eastwood" wrote

    Welcome to the sport/addiction!!!
    My recommendation would be to NOT upgrade your bike heavily. I’d say go for new tires, a new saddle if needed, switch grips out, etc… but just the small stuff. It sounds like you’ve had some fun with your bike, which looks like a good starter bike, and that’s the purpose of it… to get you into the sport and let you see how serious you are! Sounds like mission accomplished!! 😃
    If you are serious about riding I’d say your money is better invested in a higher end bike with better components. Look at the trails you are riding, the type of riding you are most interested in, what you want to get out of the sport and research higher end bikes that fit your needs. That would be my advice at least.

    +1 Good advice.

    I’d say tires, saddle, pedals (? depends on what you’ve already got), maybe suspension.

  • #92684

    Thanks, eastwood and Goo,

    Since my last entry I had my bike in the shop for a tune up and the tech said I need to lube it more often, (it’s in the weather on my rack alot). After I got it back it shifted on it’s own alot. An experienced rider suggested I get an xtr front derailleur which I did from ebay, (it’s not on yet). I hope it fixes the problem. Anyways, thanks for your advice; I plan on taking it for the most part. I’m not going to upgrade unless I have problems like the derailleur trouble just mentioned.

    Happy Trails,
    mtb4good

  • #92685

    besides pedals if you go clipless I would not up grade stuff unless it breaks. Save the money and upgrade to a lighter bike.

  • #92686

    if you do plan on upgrading at some point, dont upgrade the components on this bike unless they will fit what ever bike you get. Thats what i did. I only upgraded what would fit on my next bike ( which i have already) i knew what i was going to upgrade to.

    check the cables if it still shifts on its own, it may be loose.

  • #92687
    "mtb4good" wrote

    An experienced rider suggested I get an xtr front derailleur which I did from ebay, (it’s not on yet). I hope it fixes the problem.

    Derailleurs just do what they are told, and ghost shifting is generally a cable, chain or chainring/cassette issue. Occasionally a shifter going bad can cause it too, but that’s less likely.

    Used prices on the XTR probably even out, but when you’re shopping new, the XTR front derailleur has very minimal weight savings and zero functional difference over the XT, but it costs a LOT more. For the rear derailleur, there are significant differences between the XT and XTR.

  • #92688

    You should not require an XTR component to get your bike to shift properly, front or rear. For the non weight weenie, and XT or LX (X9/X7) should prove to be fine. If they won’t allow proper shifting, you have problems elsewhere.

    Go 1×9 and drop the front mech and shifter all together, problem solved for no cash! 😄 or should that be 😼

  • #92689

    Bottomline. You have a bike that is $500.00 new…

    If your upgrading as mentioned before tires, grips, saddle is a great idea for your comfort.

    Save your money and replace only what breaks as also mentioned. Going with XTR from a bike that uses Alivio is a bit much and not necessary.

    When you feel the time is right find yourself a bike that you want to use as your next level bike..

    Looking at the specs of the Giant Rincon. There are too many components that you could upgrade…But again not worth it.. Save the cash and get something in the future that better suits what you want to do next…….XC , Trail, AM, FR, DH….etc…etc..With the Ghost shifting what could have happenend is that the cable tension is too low up front or the whole derailleur is not adjusted correctly..Which I may add a poorly adjusted XTR would do the same…

  • #92690

    All good advice given. Putting higher end components on a cheap frame does little to make the bike better or worth more. If you know your going to be riding on a regular basis, start saving for a better bike now. You don’t need to spend 2 grand to get a good quality bike, for $1000 to $1200 you can get a bike that will last and do everything you need it to. Sell off your old one and use what ever cash you can get for it to help off set the cost on the new one. I started off with a decent Fuji in July 1996, and less than a year later, I upgraded nicely to a ’97 Stumpjumper Comp. That bike still serves me very well to this day, and nothing ever needed to be up graded. Remember, it’s the rider, not the bike! I’m glad I never wasted my money on upgraded components for the Fuji. Figure out the bike that best suits your riding needs and budget, and start saving for it now.

  • #92691

    i agree mostly that its the rider not the bike, there is a certain percentage that it is the bike. if you have a cheap junk bike, you will not be able to ride to your full potential. Same with parts, now that dosnt mean you have to buy the most expensive, but dont buy the cheapest either. I can say this from personal experience. I bought a good bike, and i had a blast. I upgraded the components to all Shimano XT and better brakes, and had an even better ride.

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