Updating the look of an old bike

Forums Mountain Bike Forum Updating the look of an old bike

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    • #80146

      I ride a Gary Fisher Aquila from about 94′, its gotten a few nicks and dings here and the from ALOT of riding over the years. I’m thinking of sanding it down, smoothing it out and repainting it with chameleon paint and throwing new decals on it, maybe some new bars and a new seat. What do you guys think? With an old bike I don’t have to worry about voiding a warranty. Just a thought.

    • #80147

      Hey Tyler,sounds like a fantastic idea.Can you still get stickers for it?Tell us more about the bike dude,I’m curious to know the whole story.Are you the one and only owner,or did you buy it from somone else?How are the wheels,are they in good shape?
      This makes me really curious about a bike that old,that makes somone want to ride it,you know what I mean?I mean,if the frame geometry is still good enough to make it an enjoyable and comfortable ride,it must have been one heck of bike when it came out in 94′.Hmmmmmm,let us know Tyler.

    • #80148

      Dude that sounds cool. One of the people that I ride with has a Schwinn Moab that is about 15 years old or something. She’s taken care of it and has upgraded some of the stuff but it rides sweet and gets all kinds of compliments from people. You should hold onto that bike – it’s like driving a classic car. 😎

    • #80149

      I’m not the original rider but my stepdad is. When he got it he lost his lisence for speeding tickets so he threw a bunch of money at it and made it a fun bike, reliable bike. I can’t get Gary Fisher factory decals but I think I’m going to get the Duplicolor Red/Blue Mirrage paint and go to a local place(sign Proin Mason City, IA) for the decals, I’m going to try to find a crazy font and have them done in a chrome looking color. But a little more about the bike, its a Gary Fisher Aquila, Forrest Green with a black fork and its got Shimano Alivio brakes with Shimano STX levers/shifter combo, Tioga Avenger headset, Shimano Hyperdrive-C front sprocket, Shimano STX crank and frond derailer, Exadge LK400 rear derailer,a Black Burn saddlebag, I put a solid fork(can’t remeber the brand), and Chicopee CST Pro tires, I’m not sure what rims but they are true and they take 2-3 foot drops onto concrete regularly. He told me that it was an exspensive bike in its day, I need to find a rebuild kit for the Rockshox I can’t remember what model rite off the top of my head, but thats my bike, might not be much to some people riding $7000 bikes but hey it got me out on the trails and if they can’t respect that then I don’t have to ride with them.

    • #80150
      but thats my bike, might not be much to some people riding $7000 bikes but hey it got me out on the trails and if they can’t respect that then I don’t have to ride with them.

      Totally dude,sounds like your having a real kick in the ass with that bike fixing her up and personalizing it.There’s nothing better than a frame/bike that just feals right,not to mention the timeless riding experience you’ll get out of that bike. 😎 😎 😎
      If I may make a suggestion on your rims even though there in great shape,just somthing that will help to extend the life of those rims is to make sure you put some drops of oil down the spoke nipples if you havent already.Nothing worse than rust in the spoke nipples to ruin a great pair of wheels.I know because it happened with my throwback Marin Pine Mountain Hard Tail which I bought used and then when it came time to true the wheels,the spokes had rusted up and couldnt be worked on.I guess I still have the hubs to build new wheels out of though. 😏
      Use light oil so it gets down into the threads of the nipple and spoke threads,just use triflow or somthing your LBS might suggest for this.

    • #80151
      "steve32300" wrote

      If I may make a suggestion on your rims even though there in great shape,just somthing that will help to extend the life of those rims is to make sure you put some drops of oil down the spoke nipples if you havent already.Nothing worse than rust in the spoke nipples to ruin a great pair of wheels.I know because it happened with my throwback Marin Pine Mountain Hard Tail which I bought used and then when it came time to true the wheels,the spokes had rusted up and couldnt be worked on.I guess I still have the hubs to build new wheels out of though. 😏
      Use light oil so it gets down into the threads of the nipple and spoke threads,just use triflow or somthing your LBS might suggest for this.

      how well would PB Blaster penitrating oil work?

    • #80152
      how well would PB Blaster penitrating oil work?

      I dont know how that would work dude,I’m not familiar with it.What you want is somthing that will repell water and moisture as well as penetrate,so I guess it would work as long as it repells water and moisture.If it’s automotive type stuff,I might be afraid it would penetrate a little too far and get into the rim tape and tube and then you might have a mess.Might want to wait for either a better reply to the subject here on singletracks or call down to your LBS and ask them what they think.

    • #80153
      might not be much to some people riding $7000 bikes but hey it got me out on the trails and if they can’t respect that then I don’t have to ride with them.

      f****** right, you’re the man

    • #80154

      Definitely hang on to that thing! My LBS is selling a brand-new Stumpjumper Classic that has a steel frame and rigid fork…price? $1,000.00!!!

    • #80155

      now im fairly new to riding like these bikes were designed to be riden and still a newbe to upgrading them, what quality of parts do i have? I know that they work good and are in good physical and mechanical shape.

    • #80156

      From your previous post, it sounds like you have a decent component set…I’d leave well enough alone until something breaks, then replace that piece.

      As for the fork, did I read correctly that you replaced the original suspension fork with a rigid one?

      If so, I might not bother fixing the old suspension fork, suspension technology has come a LONG way since then and even an entry level Marzocchi or Fox would blow that one away.

    • #80157
      "maddslacker" wrote

      As for the fork, did I read correctly that you replaced the original suspension fork with a rigid one?

      If so, I might not bother fixing the old suspension fork, suspension technology has come a LONG way since then and even an entry level Marzocchi or Fox would blow that one away.

      You did read that correctly, it was a rigid new and my step dad threw on a Rockshox something, then it spent 4 years hanging from a grage ceiling and I hopped on it one day hit a pot hole and the shock lost all presure. How could I find out what lenth shock I would need to keep steering geometrey correct

    • #80158

      what model is the RockShox?

    • #80159
      "maddslacker" wrote

      what model is the RockShox?

      Don’t know off the top of my head, its in my parents garage which is an hour away

    • #80160

      i do not know how long you have been riding but, in my opinion, riders that ride rigid become better reading the trail and picking the best lines.

      I am really thinking of either fixing my ’92 Trek 830 (front shifter) or turning it into a single speed for when I ride with my kids or slower riders.

    • #80161
      "brianW" wrote

      i do not know how long you have been riding but, in my opinion, riders that ride rigid become better reading the trail and picking the best lines.

      Thats a good idea

    • #80162

      I agree with Mongoose., yo have to read the trail no matter what you ride, but with a full suspension you can get away with a little more and your body pays for it less.

    • #80163
      "IATyler" wrote

      How could I find out what lenth shock I would need to keep steering geometrey correct

      Mongoose mentioned fork travel ranges between 80-100mm and those will probably be good for the style of riding and bike frame you have but the geometry issue is a more in depth matter than just travel.

      You need the crown to axle height of the new fork you buy to be in the same range as the current fork you have on it. If you stay in the same range it won’t change the geometry of the bike much. Just take a tape measure and measure from the middle of your axle to the bottom of the crown race (the part that touches the underside of your frame at the steering tube) on the fork to get the number in millimeters.

      The steering can also be affected by the "rake" or fork offset that it has built in so you probably want to keep that in the same range as well if you want to keep the same handling characteristics. Rake/offset is the forward displacement of the wheel axle in relation to the steering axis. To get this number, draw an immaginary line down to the floor through the center of the steering column and measure from the center of the axle to this line.

      If you can’t get to the bike to get these measurements, we should still be able to find them in an online users manual if you can figure out the fork model and year . That would also help you figure out if it’s a broken fork that needs full replacement or just in need of some TLC to bring it back to life. 😉

    • #80164

      thanks guys, the info helps and i think im going to ride it rigid for the rest of the season to teach myself to read the trail better then over the winter get a front shock and maybe tear into the Rockshox and clean it up throw in new o-rings and what not to see if I can bring it back to life, even the weight of the bike makes it bottom out with no signs of even a snails rate of rebound, if I mess up the old shock I’m out an already junk shock either way it will be a learning experiance.

    • #80165
      Definitely hang on to that thing! My LBS is selling a brand-new Stumpjumper Classic that has a steel frame and rigid fork…price? $1,000.00!!!

      What year is it?Is it a current year model,or is it an old one just never used?What bike store is it at?Sorry for the unretained excitement but I own a stumpjumper and am looking at building a rigids bike and this makes me wonder whats up with it.

    • #80166
      "steve32300" wrote

      What year is it?Is it a current year model,or is it an old one just never used?What bike store is it at?Sorry for the unretained excitement but I own a stumpjumper and am looking at building a rigids bike and this makes me wonder whats up with it.

      It’s brand new, but made to the old specs of the first year model run, and fitted with modern components. XTR, as I recall.

      It was at BikeSource in Highlands Ranch a couple months ago, I wouldn’t be surprised if they still had it.

    • #80167
      "maddslacker" wrote

      It’s brand new, but made to the old specs of the first year model run, and fitted with modern components. XTR, as I recall.

      It was at BikeSource in Highlands Ranch a couple months ago, I wouldn’t be surprised if they still had it.

      If it’s full new XTR, $1000 for the bike is probably cheaper than what they paid for the components alone.

    • #80168

      Yeah, when I inquired about it they had marked it way down because nobody wanted it.

    • #80169

      I also considered getting a tough rear fender for it to strap some tools and extra parts to it but that would be just one more ting to have break, so that is still up in the air

    • #80170

      I did a little to change theappearance and performance of my ike and myself on it, I got Demesion alloy pedals a month or 2 ago and today I got the toe clips I also ditched the factory Fisher domed top seat for a Specialized V-Groove. Also was $50 for the seat about rite or was it a rip off?

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