Twist Shifters

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    • #85018

      The rear deraileur shifter on my bike finally gave up. I was thinking about buying the SRAM x.9 or X.7 shifter set with levers when I noticed the grip shifter set. Anybody have experience with twist shifters?

    • #85019

      Yeah, Chili is right – stay away from grip shifters. I always had a hard time with accidental shifts, especially when climbing.

      Can anyone speak to the advantages (if any) of grip shifters? Do they save weight? As far as I can tell they’re mostly just for looks…

    • #85020

      The only advantage I can think of is one related to hand placement on the bars when shifting.

      Grip shifters allow you to keep your entire hand with all fingers and thumb on the handlebar when you shift. It [i:3m6u1air]might[/i:3m6u1air] make you feel like you have a more secure base of your body on the bars. Trigger shifters require you to take your thumb or pointer finger off the bars to make the shift.

      For most people, that’s a non-issue. Most people ride with the pointer finger (at least) on the brake lever anyways. To move it over to the trigger shifter is really almost second nature.

      Even that "benefit" would probably be minimum when you look at changing gears on a grip shifter from the standpoint of the extra wrist motion it requires. Yes you get to keep all fingers and your thumb on the bars for a base, but you have to bend your entire writst to make the change. That base just got shot out the window for the most part.

    • #85021

      Grip shifters are lighter, and I have several riding buddies who swear by them. But the hard core dudes, racers, etc all have trigger shifters.

    • #85022

      They’re anywhere from 20-100g lighter than most trigger shifters of the same "level" so I guess you could claim that as a benefit. Although, we are talking about 100g (at [i:bjpqku7d]most[/i:bjpqku7d] and then only when comparing the really low levels of shifters.) Also, it’s not even rotational weight so you will hardly feel it. Regardless, they are lighter.

      I had a friend of mine who used to keep them on his bike because they would allow quick shifting through multiple gears and a lot of older trigger shifters would only go one at a time. This would be another benefit in some cases. Most triggers will let you go up multiple gears at a time but not in the other direction. (XTRs allow for down shifting two gears at a time but most of the other Shimano products only allow one at a time.)

      FWIW, he ditched them in favor of some Shimano XT triggers that allow you shift up and down without taking fingers off the brake lever.

      But, for those counting, I guess thats 3 advantages so far.

    • #85023

      I like my shimano trigger shifters…

    • #85024

      Anybody have the X.7s or X.9s? When you look at reviews on MTBR it seems as though nobody is totally happy with their stuff but put up with it, so its hard to tell if anybody really likes them or not.

    • #85025

      I put a set of X-7s on my girls bike and I think they’re pretty nice for the money, actually. Very crisp shifting and not going to break the bank. They don’t have ALL the bells and whistles but I feel like they do perform better than the middle tier Shimano’s as far as shifting quality and ease.

      The only complaints I might have would be the lack of a gear indicator (which Stephanie has no issues with) and the fact that they are not compatible with Shimano [i:1wb2dzyl]rear[/i:1wb2dzyl] derailleurs because they have a different cable pull ratio than Shimano uses. She had an SRAM rear derailleur already on her bike so they were a no brainer in that case.

      If I had to guess, I’d say people probably complained about stuff like lack of adjustability, the resiliency of the materials it was made out of, and the weight. Don’t forget they are middle tier shifters. Not the best of the bunch. You don’t get a Mercedes when you pay for a Kia. But they will get the job done for a fair price.

      I’d suggest going to Shimano and SRAM’s websites and checking out the differences in each shifter in their lines. As you would expect, the nicer lines have more bells and whistles, some of which are REALLY nice to have. Most of the time they have decent descriptions of the "technology" so you can figure out what it is and whether or not it is something you can live without.

      SRAM (click on components for the shifters and pick your series)
      http://www.sram.com/en/srammountain/

      SHIMANO (click on products and mountain bike and pick your series)
      http://bike.shimano.com/publish/content … n/xtr.html

    • #85026

      Thanks everybody. This info is very helpful.

    • #85027

      Defintely. I’ve used the X-7’s before, and eventually moved up to the X-9. I’m purely happy right here. But I never really had "problems" with the X-7.

      I doubt I’d go to the X-0 unless it was a gift or something. $200 is a little out of my range at this moment. I personally think anything lower than the X-7 is not worth buying, IMO anyway. We also have reviews here at singletracks. So take a gander.

      http://www.singletracks.com/mountain-bi … php?mtb=31

    • #85028

      from reviews I’ve read is it fair to say that functionally the x9 and x0 are similar, with the x0 just being lighter?

      I’m a Shimano guy so that’s just a guess on my part… 😆

    • #85029

      I run X-9 Triggers and they are the best I have owned. They are coupled with an X-0 Rear derailure and I have never had an issue with them.

      Say away from twisty stuff. That accidental two gears up on a climb will absolutly kill you.

    • #85030

      coming from someone who has use both TRIGGER ALL THE WAY my old fisher(24") that i had in middle school was a grip shift and i did not like them, always out of adjustment for some reason and shifting when pedaling really hard sucked and with my shifters on my current bike (Shimano XTS) I can fly through the gears almost as fast and there is no accidental shifting which out ways any possitive because shifting under power will tear up a $5000 bike like it will a $75 wallyworld special, its just not a good thing ever.

    • #85031

      I wonder how many of you that knock twist shifters have actually tried them? The current SRAM 1:1 setups work great. I’m a old Shimano Rapid Fire guy, and when using SRAM stuff, I find the twist shifters to be much more intuitive than SRAM triggers. They have a weight advantage over just about everything, and the micro-clicks in the left shifter allowing trimming the f. derailleur to do away with all rubbing, unlike any other current system. And if you have thumb problems (like many alpine skiers), you can still use the shifters. I know a number of very skilled mountain bikers who swear by them.

      They’re not for everyone, and they do complicate brake lever placement on some designs, but they are a valid choice for many.

    • #85032

      My first Mtn. Bike,a Marin Pine Mountain had twist grip shifter’s and worked great,used them for about 7 years or so.The usual accidental shifting on technical climbs and deccents every once in awhile,although they would shift accuratley and without hestitation or indexing problems.I actually liked them,although the general concensus is that there just not cool I guess,kinda like fork stanchion or shock shaft covers.

      the micro-clicks in the left shifter allowing trimming the f. derailleur to do away with all rubbing

      I like this feature,kinda makes me want to check out what’s going on with the grip shifter’s these day’s,and I am gonna build a rigid surly inteigator this coming year and still need to buy shifter’s,hmmmmmmmmmm.

    • #85033
      "steve32300" wrote

      I am gonna build a rigid surly inteigator this coming year and still need to buy shifter’s,hmmmmmmmmmm.

      I thought Surly’s were required to be single speeds..if you build it with gears, won’t they take it away from you? 😆

    • #85034
      I thought Surly’s were required to be single speeds..if you build it with gears, won’t they take it away from you?

      shhhhhhhhh…………..it is a secret…… 😏 hahahahaha.

      I’m gonna have both,gears and SS,I’m thinkin I miss the ol’ days of urban riding with my old BMX buddies so long ago with the simplicity of one gear and one brake,although I might have two brakes this time??? 😉

    • #85035
      "bde1024" wrote

      I wonder how many of you that knock twist shifters have actually tried them? The current SRAM 1:1 setups work great. I’m a old Shimano Rapid Fire guy, and when using SRAM stuff, I find the twist shifters to be much more intuitive than SRAM triggers. They have a weight advantage over just about everything, and the micro-clicks in the left shifter allowing trimming the f. derailleur to do away with all rubbing, unlike any other current system. And if you have thumb problems (like many alpine skiers), you can still use the shifters. I know a number of very skilled mountain bikers who swear by them.

      They’re not for everyone, and they do complicate brake lever placement on some designs, but they are a valid choice for many.

      My Old Marin has the twist shifters on it. While I still ride it and it gets the job done I MUCH prefer the Triggers. I have ridden a friends bike with the Sram TWists you refer to. You are correct in that they have some advantage in weight. If the triggers are adjusted correctly there should be no issues with chain rub anyway.

      All that said you are correct in that Twists could be good for some people. However, if I were to make a recomendation I to a new rider or anyone for that matter I would recomend the triggers because more oftern than not it is the "prefered" equipment.

    • #85036

      Yeah, I’ve used them too. There’s nothing technically wrong with them as a concept, I just don’t like them.

    • #85037

      I used Sram X.7 Now I am using Shimano Deore XT Shadow (it came whit my bike). I am thinking seriusly in going back to X.7 because the fast and clear shift.

    • #85038

      I used gripshifters on my geared bike and loved it. I had SRAM Attack shifters paired with Shimano XT derailleurs.

      Bike came with Deore triggers…didn’t like them. The gripshifters require less effort to shift…doesn’t sound like a big deal, but when you’re 6+hrs into a ride, every bit of effort you can save is good!

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