Rigid forks?

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    • #81476

      I learned to ride in the foothills above Boulder, CO on a straight forked tank (sadly, I dropped the bottom bracket of that bike in Moab). I now have an entry-level (it’s all I could afford) hard tail with a cheap shock up front. I still haven’t grown accustomed to the feel of the suspension. It just seems too squishy, although I’m pretty sure it’s saved me from a couple of potential endos. What do you guys think: keep the shock or go rigid?

    • #81477

      Welcome! So what bike are you riding now?

    • #81478
      "droc" wrote

      Welcome! So what bike are you riding now?

      My current bike is a K2 ZED 1.0 with a suntour sr xct-v2 fork.

    • #81479

      Hello ibdrown,welcome to singletracks dude,always cool to see new singletrack members especially when there from colorado,hahahaha.I’m down here in Arvada.

      keep the shock or go rigid

      I’ll start out by telling you my similar situation to yours.My first mtn bike was a hard tail that I bought used and had an old rox shox that only had minimul travel.I was stuck with that bike for awhile because I couldnt figure out if I should keep the shock or go rigid.I just couldnt buy another bike with or without suspension because I wanted both,I wanted the full suspension because I never had one and wanted to try one out.I ended up buying my full suspension stumpjumper that both the fork and shock LOCKED OUT so it could be ridden as a Rigid,hard tail,or full suspension so I have the best of all three worlds.The thing is,I dont use the full suspension on the trail unless it is going down hill,I love riding a rigid bike.I know it’s a little slower,but I dont race,and I’m not in a hurry to get off the trail when I’m out riding.Public trails are not for racing so it works out pretty good.Just me,but maby you can find a supsension fork that Locks Out so you can have both the rigid and the suspension fork.

    • #81480
      "ibdrown" wrote

      I learned to ride in the foothills above Boulder, CO on a straight forked tank (sadly, I dropped the bottom bracket of that bike in Moab). I now have an entry-level (it’s all I could afford) hard tail with a cheap shock up front. I still haven’t grown accustomed to the feel of the suspension. It just seems too squishy, although I’m pretty sure it’s saved me from a couple of potential endos. What do you guys think: keep the shock or go rigid?

      I think it depends on your riding style and the trails you like to ride.

      A buddy of mine is, what I call, a "stand and mash" type rider. His first instinct is to put it in high gear and stand up and power through over obstacles or to the top of a climb. He rides a rigid 29er and it fits his style perfectly. He tried out a low travel front fork but found that it DIDN’T add a lot of shock absorption but it DID make his pedal stroke pretty inefficeint. He would bob up and down on the front end of the bike everytime he stood up to put the hammer down. Most of the trails he rides are smoother so he can get away with 29" wheels and a rigid fork (he went with carbon because it is a bit more forgiving than steel).

      I personally prefer to ride rougher, more technical trails and I am, what I call, a "sit and spin" guy. On long climbs, I put it in an easier gear and sit down and spin my way up the hill. I actually enjoy having a fork that has some travel because I use it to bounce up and over obstacles. I find a non-rigid front fork is MUCH easier for me to climb with. My first bike was a fully rigid 26". It required a different techinque to climb well. My next bike, my hardtail, was much better suited to my "style" with its front fork.

      Most people ended up learning on some form of cheap rigid bike when they first started. You can always go back to that as well. A fully rigid bike will always be the most responsive bike you can ride because you won’t lose momentum compressing a shock or fork. It just depends on how you like to ride. Figure out your style and pick components that will work for you.

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