Riding without a camelbak

Forums Mountain Bike Forum Riding without a camelbak

Tagged: 

Viewing 36 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #102812

      Due to some skin irritation issues with my back, I am not able to ride wearing any kind of back pack lately. I’ve been using my pack strapped onto a rack with bungies for longer rides like so:
      Image
      Funny how redistributing that little bit of weight on the bike like that really hurts its handling. I just checked WheelWorld and they have a pretty good selection of larger under seat storage and one handlebar bag. Just curious, any of you other riders go hydration pack-less? I am most concerned about being able to carry enough water for longer rides.
      Any advice or recommended gear is appreciated. Looks like it might be a while before I can strap on a pack again.

    • #102813

      So it would look really silly, but is there a way you could wear your Camelbak on the front of your torso?

    • #102814
      "Fitch" wrote

      So it would look really silly, but is there a way you could wear your Camelbak on the front of your torso?

      Had not thought of that – folks wouldn’t know if I was coming or going, or had my head on backwards 😆

      Seems like I remember seeing a hydration pack somewhere that rides a lot lower, which might work for me.

    • #102815

      Some of the new Camelbaks have reservoirs that wrap around the waist strap to place the load right on your hips. Sounds more comfortable to me…

    • #102816

      There also is a hip pack Camelbak (if you can handle the fanny pack look).

      http://www.camelbak.com/Sports-Recreati … lo-LR.aspx

    • #102817

      Have been riding with two cages/two water bottles since getting back into MTB in May of this year. Seemed to be sufficient but limited my rides to 25 miles or less and I rarely had any water left at end of my ride. Just purchased my first camelback off ebay and looking forward to having more options and being able to extend my ride time/mileage.

    • #102818

      If you can mount two cages on your frame do it. the also make cages for the seat post. Also a bag for your saddle to place tools and I have seen smaller bags that go on the top tube. For longer rides you could either bring some iodine tablets or a filter and just refill bottles from a stream.

    • #102819

      In cooler weather I can get by with the water bottles and I like it. I feel lighter and less tied up than when I have to strap my camel back on in the warmer months. I like not wearing my camel back 😃

    • #102820

      Either water bottle cages on your frame or a fanny waist hydration pack around your waist. Either is the best route for going bag less. Good luck!

      On-On!

    • #102821

      Thanks for all the suggestions. See where this is coming out next year
      http://reviews.mtbr.com/camelbak-charge-lr
      Funny the last year or so I have not been using my reservoir that much, especially for the hot months. For long rides I would take 4 pints of water, 3 in the pack and one in a cage. I find water management easier as I always know how much water is left and ration it out accordingly.
      I have not seen the bag for the top tube yet, but I will do some more shopping around. Thanks all!

    • #102822

      There is also a water bottle with a filter built in that would allow you to refill from natural resources..I don’t know the brand name or how reliable they are but worth it to keep your ears open for reviews on them.Also, I have mountain biked with under the seat bags, they didn’t last very long for me, all the bouncing around from rocky trails and bumps really tore the bag up…I guess there are bags that don’t flip around though or make sure you strap it down so it don’t flop around and tear it up..

    • #102823

      Not to sure if this would work for you but throwing it out there!

      Showerpass Veleau

    • #102824

      My answer to a hydration pack has been the velobak… The jersey with the buit in 72 oz bladder… I have 2 camelbaks that I haven’t used since. It doesn’t feel like a pack at all, but I’m not sure if it would irritate your skin.

    • #102825

      I don’t like riding with my camelback too much either. I take two bottles on the bike and one in my jersey rear pockets for longer rides.

    • #102826

      I love my Camelbak, mostly because I pack it completely up and think of it primarily as a workout tool 😀

      In the pak:

      3 liters of fluid(whether I need it or not)
      2 tubes
      patch kit
      caliper spacer block
      Parks multi-tool
      combo screwdriver
      first aid kit
      mini pump
      headlamp(and two sets of spare batteries)
      my phone(running iMapMyRide+)
      I also volunteer to carry the trail saw if I’m in a group and it needs to go out.

      Then I pull the chest and waist strap tight so it doesn’t hit me in the back of my head when I’m airborne 😀

      I like to think that my core muscles have been helped somewhat by the additional weight.

      Or maybe I’m just a masochist.

    • #102827

      I’d be very unhappy if I couldn’t wear my Camelback. Water plus needed tubes ect. Water bottles make the bike feel heavy when it the tight stuff. For me Camelbacks Rule. 😄 Later,

    • #102828
      "fat_billy" wrote

      I’d be very unhappy if I couldn’t wear my Camelback. Water plus needed tubes ect. Water bottles make the bike feel heavy when it the tight stuff. For me Camelbacks Rule. 😄 Later,

      I tried going back to the Camelback the last 2 weeks. At first it worked OK, then it didn’t. Looks like I am going to have try some alternate methods. 😢 Thinking handlebar bag, seat post bag, and one of the bags that rides low. Anything that rubs on my shoulder blade area won’t work. The rack would work if I could go downhill all the time. 😆

    • #102829

      I can’t stand wearing a camelback. I overheat, almost instantly.
      I use the cages, and a regular hiking fannypack. I fill the fanny pack with conventional water bottles, and whatever else I need. I have a mtnsmith pack that has a narrow strap to help support the weight, when I’m fully stocked with water.
      I got the wife a fannypack style bladder type thing. I’ve never tried it.

    • #102830
      "schwim" wrote

      I love my Camelbak, mostly because I pack it completely up and think of it primarily as a workout tool 😀

      In the pak:

      3 liters of fluid(whether I need it or not)
      2 tubes
      patch kit
      caliper spacer block
      Parks multi-tool
      combo screwdriver
      first aid kit
      mini pump
      headlamp(and two sets of spare batteries)
      my phone(running iMapMyRide+)
      I also volunteer to carry the trail saw if I’m in a group and it needs to go out.

      Then I pull the chest and waist strap tight so it doesn’t hit me in the back of my head when I’m airborne 😀

      I like to think that my core muscles have been helped somewhat by the additional weight.

      Or maybe I’m just a masochist.

      (I didn’t mean to quote the whole thing) but I’m with Schwim, great work out for the core and I know I’m a bit of a masochist 😼 I’ve heard on more than one occasion "that boy ain’t right"

    • #102831

      I started riding recently without mine but I am really not too sure why,haha.It was a little Bell brand camelback from Wal Mart and I never used it for water,just tube,pump,patch stuff.After I used my spare tube I saw no need for it one day and have just kinda quit using it.If I go out to9 work on the trail,I’ll take a regular back pack and stuff it full of tools,lunch and whatever else but I just transport it to the spot and set it down,I don’t really ride with it.

    • #102832

      Yeah my camelbak bag is stuffed with tools food extra cloths in winter it becomes a weigh down

    • #102833

      I love my camelpack. I just started riding this past year, and started with a water bottle, but moved up to a camel pack.

      In the beginning the camel pack was the only way for me because I could get water without stopping, and I was always needing water.

      As I seem to be in better riding shape it is not as big of a issue, but I still ove my camelpack. Got a new one for xmas that is smaller, but has less storage.

    • #102834

      i some times feel way too top heavy at the start of a ride on a steep downhill with 3 liters and other stuff in pack,better to fill 1/2 way and carry bottles.

    • #102835

      Wow… the shoulder blade thing sucks but to everyone else, dang you guys are picky! 😆
      I ride with my small camelbak for short rides and the large one for longer rides. But it doesn’t matter if I get them confused because I don’t sweat a lot.

    • #102836

      I never cared for Camebacks when riding so I’ve been using a frame mounted bottle. Nalgene makes a bottle with a dirt cap I found on Amazon. The cap flips up and then you pull the valve open with your mouth. When you close the cap, the valve is closed. Dishwasher safe too.

      http://www.amazon.com/Nalgene-All-Terra … 29&sr=8-13

    • #102837

      But that bit of dirt on the valve of the bottles gives your body minerals…

    • #102838

      That bottle valve dirt will also help keep you regular. Just saying. 😄 Later,

    • #102839
      "jrobertharms" wrote

      i some times feel way too top heavy at the start of a ride on a steep downhill with 3 liters and other stuff in pack,better to fill 1/2 way and carry bottles.

      I’ve been moving this direction lately. I still take my Camelbak, but with little or no water. It’s still good for tools, spares, food, and room to stuff layers that are shed as I warm up.

      I have two cages on my frame now that I can fill with water which is plenty for most local rides this time of year. I may have to adjust as temps rise and rides get longer, but removing the weight from my back and shoulder has been nice.

      Ran into a guy on the trail recently with a pack that distributed the water across the lower back instead of vertically. Not sure the brand, but he seemed to like it vs. the traditional design.

    • #102840
      "fleetwood" wrote

      Ran into a guy on the trail recently with a pack that distributed the water across the lower back instead of vertically. Not sure the brand, but he seemed to like it vs. the traditional design.

      That sounds like the new camelbak design:

      http://www.camelbak.com/Sports-Recreati … ne-LR.aspx

    • #102841
      "maddslacker" wrote

      [quote="fleetwood":1tt2mbu8]Ran into a guy on the trail recently with a pack that distributed the water across the lower back instead of vertically. Not sure the brand, but he seemed to like it vs. the traditional design.

      That sounds like the new camelbak design:

      http://www.camelbak.com/Sports-Recreati … ne-LR.aspx[/quote:1tt2mbu8]

      I haven’t heard many great things about the new camelbaks w/the lumbar bladder, supposedly you can’t get all of the water out due to the baffles.

      Also check out Wingnut packs, folks that use them LOVE them. I’ve been itching to try one myself, but rarely find myself riding with a pack nowadays, so I can’t justify spending the $$ on another pack (I’ve got 3 hydration packs already….)

    • #102842
      "DanK_NoCo" wrote

      I can’t stand wearing a camelback. I overheat, almost instantly.
      I use the cages, and a regular hiking fannypack. I fill the fanny pack with conventional water bottles, and whatever else I need. I have a mtnsmith pack that has a narrow strap to help support the weight, when I’m fully stocked with water.
      I got the wife a fannypack style bladder type thing. I’ve never tried it.

      Rode 5 hours with one of these last week and it worked pretty well.
      http://www.mountainsmith.com/products.a … egory2Id=0
      Not a lot of room for extra clothes, but I may be able to strap some on the back with some small bungies.

    • #102843

      That looks very nice! It also looks like it would carry a bit more than my MULE, which I would love. I may end up picking one of those up when funds permit.

    • #102844

      when you get a flu shot they give you the flu so eating dirt is an imunization. Get out of your bubble and eat some dirt.

    • #102845
      "schwim" wrote

      That looks very nice! It also looks like it would carry a bit more than my MULE, which I would love. I may end up picking one of those up when funds permit.

      Not sure the size of the Mule. So far I have been pleased. Quality is good, has a strong buckle and easily adjustable belt. 2 water bottle holes and holds most of my gear. Seat bag for other small stuff. Got a bar bag coming in from Price Point soon.

      Its kind of liberating not having a bag on your back, not to mention all the sweat it induces. I might stick with this setup for a while. Only thing I don’t have a place for is my pump, which I taped onto the frame.

    • #102846
      "CraigCreekRider" wrote

      Rode 5 hours with one of these last week and it worked pretty well.
      http://www.mountainsmith.com/products.a … egory2Id=0
      Not a lot of room for extra clothes, but I may be able to strap some on the back with some small bungies.

      This is what I’ve got (really like it):
      http://www.mountainsmith.com/products.a … egory2Id=0
      It’s a pretty similar model.
      3 bottles and a jacket is the most I’ve ever carried on the bike (with another bottle in the cage).
      I use the stock sholder strap anytime I have water in the pack. It looks like they sell a more serious set of shoulder straps. Not sure if either of the strap solutions work for CraigCreekRider. Carrying a lot of weight with no strap can be tough. To prevent sagging, I really have to pull the waist tight, which I find uncomfortable for extended climbs. There are suspension adjustments that might help, but I haven’t fiddled with it much. I just use the shoulder strap.

      I’ve done 4 bottles and strapped on various jackts when hiking with the kids.

    • #102847

      I am going to try something new myself. I am going to make a frame bag. This keeps the weight pretty central and low to the ground. I can reach everything while biking, and it will be a large volume spot!

    • #102848
      "DanK_NoCo" wrote

      [quote="CraigCreekRider":2xny2246]
      Rode 5 hours with one of these last week and it worked pretty well.
      http://www.mountainsmith.com/products.a … egory2Id=0
      Not a lot of room for extra clothes, but I may be able to strap some on the back with some small bungies.

      This is what I’ve got (really like it):
      http://www.mountainsmith.com/products.a … egory2Id=0
      It’s a pretty similar model.
      3 bottles and a jacket is the most I’ve ever carried on the bike (with another bottle in the cage).
      I use the stock sholder strap anytime I have water in the pack. It looks like they sell a more serious set of shoulder straps. Not sure if either of the strap solutions work for CraigCreekRider. Carrying a lot of weight with no strap can be tough. To prevent sagging, I really have to pull the waist tight, which I find uncomfortable for extended climbs. There are suspension adjustments that might help, but I haven’t fiddled with it much. I just use the shoulder strap.

      I’ve done 4 bottles and strapped on various jackts when hiking with the kids.[/quote:2xny2246]

      Yea these two models look pretty similar except for the straps. I would like to try one with the straps and see if it works for me. My only complaint about the one I have is that it is always wanting to sag. Reminds me of a carpenters belt. I usually just have to recinch it every hour or so. So far I have been impressed with the quality.

Viewing 36 reply threads

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.