Proper Tire Changing Etiquette?

Forums Mountain Bike Forum Proper Tire Changing Etiquette?

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    • #80795

      If you blow a tire on the trail, where/what do you guys do, or should we do?

      Trying to maintain decency, I go to the side of the trail. However on some parts it’s IMPOSSIBLE to move off to the side, for example, I was riding downhill in this canyon like path, and unless I wanted to hike-a-bike up a 97% slope in order to get off the path, I wasn’t going to get anywhere anytime fast, unfortunately I got a flat and was able to change it out because I know it’s not a well known trail to begin with.

      Soooo what’s the verdict? Also keep in mind that since I rarely get flats, I’m not professional at changing them.

    • #80796

      I think proper etiquette involves taking the necessary steps NOT to interefere with another bikers ride as much as possible.

      Try to get off the trail if you can. Like you said though, sometimes that just isn’t going to happen. In that case, at least try to do it on a section of trail where people can see you from a decent distance and they possbily aviod you or slow down enough to not crash into you.

      I hate seeing people stopped in the middle of a trail just around a bend or right at the bottom of a blind drop. At least TRY to get yourself into a position where I can slow down before riding up over the top of you. I understand that crashes normally happen in the worse places and often involve a flat tire but it’s still your job to move to a safer location if possible.

      I find that most of the time people will stop and ask if you need help. This is especially true if you haven’t caused them to wreck into you because you are sitting at the bottom of a blind drop or in a location that would make it immpossbile for the average rider to stop in time to not hit you.

    • #80797
      Trying to maintain decency, I go to the side of the trail. However on some parts it’s IMPOSSIBLE to move off to the side, for example, I was riding downhill in this canyon like path, and unless I wanted to hike-a-bike up a 97% slope in order to get off the path, I wasn’t going to get anywhere anytime fast, unfortunately I got a flat and was able to change it out because I know it’s not a well known trail to begin with

      I’ve been in this situation before,a few times.Somtimes I was able to walk my bike down to a spot where there was a little more room to let other riders by and somtimes there just isnt a place with more room to work on your bike.I just keep my eye’s open for upcoming riders and when they come along I stop working on my bike for a minute and get out of the way as much as I can,it only takes a second for them to pass,and they usually stop to see if I need anything like a tube or air or somthing.You’ll probably learn more about fixin flats in these kinda areas than in your garage alot of times.hahaha.

    • #80798

      If you can’t help being on the trail then it’s understandable. Unfortunately I have run across and almost into a couple of knuckleheads that love to stop at the bottom of a steep drop and work on their bike right in the middle of the trail when there is plenty of room to move off to the side…very annoying and dangerous.

    • #80799

      Yeah,if you find yourself at the bottom of a down hill section,then move no matter what,to a place out of the way of any gravity fed or induced speed demons because those situations usually mean that even if they can hit the brakes in time,that dont mean that they will get any traction to stop in time because they will be skidding and not stopping.Especially if there is a 300 plb rider coming down that hill,it just makes it even harder to come to a stop when skidding with that weight.Beleive me……hahahahahaaha.

    • #80800
      "steve32300" wrote

      I just keep my eye’s open for upcoming riders and when they come along I stop working on my bike for a minute and get out of the way as much as I can,it only takes a second for them to pass,and they usually stop to see if I need anything like a tube or air or somthing.

      Good call, I just hope I will be able to move out of the way if the time ever comes. But you know what they say, "There’s a first time for everything". So I’ll be prepared.

    • #80801
      So I’ll be prepared.

      Yeah,I try not to have my back to either end of the trail so I can see traffic coming either way.If your facing one way,then somone will surely come up on you from the other way,never fails.

    • #80802
      "steve32300" wrote
      So I’ll be prepared.

      Yeah,I try not to have my back to either end of the trail so I can see traffic coming either way.If your facing one way,then somone will surely come up on you from the other way,never fails.

      Ya, good call on not turning your back on the trail. And most times you can here riders coming well before you can see them.

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