New to MTBing FORKS QUESTION!!!

Forums Mountain Bike Forum New to MTBing FORKS QUESTION!!!

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    • #113141

      Hey guys, my name is MJ and I am new to mountain biking. Right now I am just riding a Walmart special, but am looking into upgrading ASAP. I have rode BMX bikes for 17 years and im [i:kqbac3x3]finally[/i:kqbac3x3] making the transition to MTB. Anyways here is my question (for finding the right bike for me)…

      Every bike I see has SR Suntours and I have found a few top entry level bikes that come with forks that are either SR SUNTOUR XCL or XRL RL w/remote lock out or RockShox Dart 3 w/ lockout…both are 100mm, which is better for an entry level rider that plans to jump, do gaps and ride aggressively?

      Thanks for all yalls input.

    • #113142

      None of the above. Those forks are designed for just regular XC riding, not big jumps, gaps, etc.

      What kind of riding are you planning on doing exactly? Or better yet, where do you plan to ride?

    • #113143

      Blankets creek i heard is alot of fun with jumps and just other trails around the North Georiga area. I am the type of rider that has the "go big or go home" attitude, so i am looking for an entry level fork that will hold up until ill make that upgrade. Ive delayed on buying my bike until i figure out which would be the better steal…

    • #113144

      Welcome to the site and MTB. As mentioned already, 100mm is not going to really be appropriate for what it appears you’re looking to get into. 100mm hardtail 29ers can take a beating and can definitely overachieve on their intent but not really to the extent that you seem to be wanting. I have a 2011 Cobia with a RS Recon on it and its been an awesome fork for a relatively inexpensive bike and I hammer some pretty rocky terrain here in Huntsville with it but I wouldn’t think of jumping or serious drops with it, even if it were a full suspension with similar travel. But, I just purchased a Tallboy LT which has enough travel for what you want to get into, riding really agressive, if you are into 29ers and there are a few other nice options as well. Are you demoing 26, 29ers, 650B? I rode out at Blankets Creek a few times, it’s a really good network out there. Perhaps I haven’t been on every trail out there though, cause I didn’t ride any trails that had gaps/jumps/insane drops but again I have not been on every trail out there.. Let us know what you end up with.. And if at all possible, demo a bike on the kind of trails you are looking to ride if you have any LBS or scheduled demos in your area, so you can make the best choice for yourself..

    • #113145

      Most of blankets is just good ol’ fashioned XC trails. Yeah, you can get some air, but nothing crazy.

      But they also have a DH run now, where you can get crazy.

      You need to figure out what kind of riding you want to do, then pick an appropriate bike.

    • #113146

      The "DH" run, quell holler, at blankets is maybe a quarter mile in length. Honestly, It’s more like a dirt jump trail than a DH trail. The most trail specific bike for that run would be a DJ bike or at least a burly hardtail with strong wheels and a strong fork. Neither one of the forks you mentioned fall in that category. It can easily be run with a number of styles of bikes depending on the skill of the rider but you should be honest about your skills and bike needs if you plan on riding safely and efficiently. Unfortunately, there aren’t many other trails in GA of it’s type either and the few that do exist are very short in length so your bike would be optimal for very few trails here. 95% of the trails in GA are simply XC.

    • #113147
      "GoldenGoose" wrote

      The "DH" run, quell holler, at blankets is maybe a quarter mile in length. Honestly, It’s more like a dirt jump trail than a DH trail. The most trail specific bike for that run would be a DJ bike or at least a burly hardtail with strong wheels and a strong fork. Neither one of the forks you mentioned fall in that category. It can easily be run with a number of styles of bikes depending on the skill of the rider but you should be honest about your skills and bike needs if you plan on riding safely and efficiently. Unfortunately, there aren’t many other trails in GA of it’s type either and the few that do exist are very short in length so your bike would be optimal for very few trails here. 95% of the trails in GA are simply XC.

      +1

      buy a bike for what kind of riding you’re going to do the most. If you’re going to drive to blankets and spend all day every day for the rest of forever riding Quehl Holler then fine, but if not…

    • #113148

      Here’s the trail in question…
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XGLhwum_f64

      😀

    • #113149

      49 seconds long from top to bottom…even with slow motion.

    • #113150
      "GoldenGoose" wrote

      49 seconds long from top to bottom…even with slow motion.

      +1

      #justsayin

    • #113151

      Hey thanks for all the replys guys. Yeah I went over to Free Flite today and got some good advice on a DJ bike, I think I am just gonna stick to just a 26" XC bike, maybe down the road if I want to get into more jumps and gaps and all that, I will invest in a DJ style bike speicfically for that, but for now, I am thinking a XC bike is more my budget with a great fork. I am still thinking a mtb is like a bmx where it is a all-in-one machine, and I know it can be (given the money), but right now money is an object, so i am really thinking about getting a 2012 Trek 6000 series…I heard the geometery on that is awesome!

    • #113152

      MJ,
      I’d say before you drop however much on a Trek. Look at Bikesdirect.com. The Motobecane bikes are a great buy and have great reviews. I just bought my road bike from them. I own a Trek Cobia (which I enjoy very much). I just wish I’d have known at the time that i could get much more bike for the amount of money i spent. For the $1000 I spent i could have got a very good full suspension bike with better components then came on my Cobia. Give em a look….

    • #113153

      if money is an object (i hear ya) check for used bikes, either from local mtb bike forums or craigslist. much better starting off like that and save for a bike you will really want later on when you figure out the direction your riding will lead you.

      this is the end of season in many areas, that and with people feeding into the 29er / 650b marketing delirium, you should be able to pick up a nice full sus 26" bike for less than a hardtail.

      the trail in the vid has some sweet rollers and almost any wheelset will do, but if you intend to go hard i’d stay with 26" wheels (smaller is inherently stronger and more taco proof).

      there are some excellent tutorials somewhere hereabouts where you can learn about the geo of bikes as well. it would be worth the effort to locate them. i find a more relaxed geo ideal for jumps and steeps, not so much for climbs tho.

    • #113154

      hey JSatch, thanks for the info. I Youtube’d some of the videos and they are great, I kinda wished I didnt watch them, cuz I am amped up now…just need to hop on a bike already! Yeah I am thinking of 26" hardtail soley, maybe later on upgrade if I wanna go that route, but as for now strictly hardtail. I am hopeing I can get some kind of [i:1njbnsv8]winter[/i:1njbnsv8] special, so we shall see…also it helps with them pushing out the 2012’s to make room for the new ones…I am definitely going to look into the geo forums to see about the bikes, that is also one of my biggest concerns besides forks. I mean I know you can buy anything to make a bike fit good, but I want a frame that fits GREAT.

    • #113155

      Like a few mentioned….Direct retailers like Motobecan and Airborne are decent as they have a good quality bike and a decent price.

      the first post you mentioned on those forks…None are long time trail worthy…I would look at a minimum RS recon as it is decent quality for the money. Look also for decent wheels with at least a double wall construction.

      If your budget is only $1000 then only look at front suspension bikes… At that price point your getting overall decent components (fork included) as well as decent wheels… Anything less and things are being compromised.

      $1600 is a decent price point for a full suspension bike.

      And yes new 2012 or 2011 models is a great way to stretch those dollars as well. Your getting a good bike and warranty.

    • #113156

      good points again by element22 regarding the original forks you mentioned.

      there are also dirt jump forks that are not long travel, but built tuff and laterally stiff. they are often a bit more affordable than longer travel good trail or freeride forks. although your initial post sounded like hitting some jumps, which you can and should work at, the jumps on the video may not need such a burley fork. that’s not to say a dj fork would be inappropriate and i’d way prefer one over the forks you originally mentioned.

      as for geo, it all depends on what and how you ride. i love bikes with a headtube angle around 66-67º. i don’t like to climb, will take shuttle runs all day long, but still can climb some when needed (~90% of the time). a higher angle will make it easier to climb. a slacker angle, like my 66-67º, makes the steeps and jumps way more fun and way safer too. not quite as slack as a full on downhill geo. so if you’re gonna buy a hardtail, check what it’s designed for, both geo and construction. you might even consider a dj bike. not a good long trail ride choice, but for that quarter mile trail in the vid it could be sweet.

      again, used bike market is where i’d go, and have gone. often. you’ll learn to do some minor mech upkeep, etc. i’ve had lots of great used bikes, my current ride is a used frame built up for ~1/3 the cost of a comparable new ride. i’d suggest getting on local mtb forums and riding with people. get their advice. and oh yeah, good luck with whatever you choose!

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