maintenance intervals

Forums Mountain Bike Forum maintenance intervals

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    • #104322

      I am somewhat new to mountain biking and have been combing the internet for a good general guide on how often to overhaul things like the BB and hubs. I have a Specialized Rockhopper and ride trails on the weekend while commuting to work just about every day on it as well rain, snow, ice, or shine. Any suggestions on intervals so my bike can last me a long time would be appreciated. Thanks.

    • #104323

      There is no set intervals for service. Many people do a minor tune at LBS every year or wait for something to stop working or get loose or fall off. Don’t worry MTBs are trouble free unless you break something. 😄 Later,

    • #104324

      I think it’s always a good idea to clean and lube things like your chain, cables, pivot points and derailers after your ride with a lube that prevents dirt and dust build up. I’m not promoting products here but I use a wax lube by Kry Tech and it works great for me besides it’s nice to sit down, crack a cold one (if you drink) and wipe down your bike, you take care of it it’ll take care of you

    • #104325

      there is no set interval like 30k-60k-90k on a car. Bikes are meant to be abused,it all depends on the rider. Some riders will beat up parts twice as fast as others. Chains,chain rings and cassettes start wearing out the moment you start the first ride on them. Chain wear tools will help keep an eye on progress. Replace chain before it’s gone and you may not have to replace rings and cassette.

    • #104326

      planes and sattelites also fall out of the sky

    • #104327

      Don’t wash your bike too much! I clean the chain and sprockets as well as lubing cables and the chain, Don’t lube the cahin too much. If you can run your finger down the chain and it gets your finger black where you touched the chain it does not need lube. Too much chain oil will gum up your drine train. I measure my chain often with a Roloff chain measuring device. When the chain shows much wear I replace it. My cassettes last through several chains. Too much lube attracts and holds dirt to the chain and spockets. I use a cloth between my cogs to keep them clean. Do I wash my bike? Not very often. I’ve never had dirt get into my headset or bottom bracket with out water taking it there. Use a spray cleaner and a rag to shine up your new ride if you have too. Cables last longer and stay in adjustment with out water helping it out. If you are going on a ride that you know will slime your beauty spray it with PAM the cooking spray. Major mud and dirt will wash off easily. Repeat after me Water is Bad-Water is Bad-Water is Bad. The other option is to spend much donero at your LBS and pressure wash your steed. Oh yeah the paint hates pressure washing. 😄 Later,

    • #104328

      I can’t agree with you more Billy, a pressure washer is a bike’s worst enemy,besides it’s rider.
      I wash gently once in a while with a light spray of water from garden hose. Spray on full blast and water will penetrate bearing seals and stay until corrosion starts. BB bearings,wheel bearings, cables everything is better off with a little dirt on the outside rather than a single drop of water on the inside.

    • #104329
      "jrobertharms" wrote

      I can’t agree with you more Billy, a pressure washer is a bike’s worst enemy,besides it’s rider.
      I wash gently once in a while with a light spray of water from garden hose. Spray on full blast and water will penetrate bearing seals and stay until corrosion starts. BB bearings,wheel bearings, cables everything is better off with a little dirt on the outside rather than a single drop of water on the inside.

      Man I’m glad I read fat billy’s and jrobertharms post I didn’t realize washing could cause that much damage I never really washed my bike after a ride but mostly because I didn’t feel like it…I still lube the chain, pivot points, cables etc…..thanx guys

    • #104330

      I usually do the following:

      After every ride:
      Wipe down fork sliders/shock slider
      If a muddy ride, hose the bike off without a nozzle on the hose, wipe dry

      Once a week or so:
      Check air pressure on tires, fork, rear shock
      Lube drivetrain
      Inspect brakes, shifters, chaingude, etc.

      Every month or so:
      Remove chain, check for wear, degrease, reinstall, lube
      Add Stan’s sealant to tires if necessary

      Once a year:
      Tear down bike completely
      Clean/inspect/lube BB bearings/seals
      Clean/inspect/lube wheel bearings
      Clean/inspect/lube headset bearings
      Clean/inspect fork and internals, lubricate bushings, oil wipers, stanchions
      Change fork oil
      Clean/inspect rear shock seals
      Clean/inspect/lube all frame bearings/bushings
      Bleed brakes
      Replace drivetrain components as necessary (cables, chainrings, cassette).
      Clean/inspect pedal bearings/bushings/cleats.

      Following this schedule I’ve had 4 consecutive seasons with basically zero downtime due to issues. I generally ride 1-3 times a week in all sorts of conditions. Maybe it’s overkill, but I have a repair stand and a majority of the tools I need. Gives me something to do on some long, cold Vermont evenings. Plus, it really keeps the bike tight and riding like new, year in and year out.

    • #104331

      Really envy you guys with the land to hose down your steeds before wheeling into the garages. I stay in an apartment & even when it was a hot dry ride, I would still have to hose down & do a quick wipe before storing indoors. Darn I wish there is a way of quickly cleaning the mud/dirt/sand etc from the tires, much like a chain cleaning machine gadget but designed to attach to clean the tires. Any DIY ideas? 😆

    • #104332

      8valve has the right idea

      Depending on what your riding and where, a schedule is a great idea. Pressure washing is a bad idea.

      For example I ride mostly gravity now a days.

      Gravity bike usually use a lot of brake, suspension gets worked a lot and everything else is really stressed.

      So in that case:

      A wipe down and thorough cleaning after every ride (regardless of conditions) and inspection is necessary. (Things like thorns, dings, kinks, leaks, and bends can be caught early before a problem).

      Once a month brakes are bleed, bearings and pivots are checked and lubed as necessary.
      Wheels are re-tensioned and true.

      At 3 months replace fork and shock oil.
      Pedals are repacked and inspected for damage.

      At 6 months replace fork and shock oil and new seals.

      Once a year a chain. ( I have multiple wheel sets and cassettes so they last longer)
      Cables are on going… Check for kinks, lamination separation of the cable and wear. Sealed cables are the best requiring very little care.

      Pretty much all my bikes go through this kind of service..I am one of those people who like to keep the bike looking new at all times. I don’t care if it costs a bit of extra money to service the bike…..I care that at all times the bikes are at tip top shape.

    • #104333
      "kcrushz" wrote

      Really envy you guys with the land to hose down your steeds before wheeling into the garages. I stay in an apartment & even when it was a hot dry ride, I would still have to hose down & do a quick wipe before storing indoors. Darn I wish there is a way of quickly cleaning the mud/dirt/sand etc from the tires, much like a chain cleaning machine gadget but designed to attach to clean the tires. Any DIY ideas? 😆

      It was once said that "necessity is the mother of all inventions" maybe something with a stiff wire brush that attatches to the back of the frame so you just pedal around the parking lot of your apt. complex and the dirt gets knocked off? You can have fun and clean your tires at the same time. Who knows this might be your 1st step in making $$millions$$ (just don’t forget the little people who got you there 😆 )

    • #104334

      I just found this: Image

      This is not "gospel" but a guide, adjust accordingly

    • #104335

      Dust could be wiped off with a soft rug. And if bike is really dirty, let it dry and simply brush it off with soft brush and wipe what left with rug. This "method" I used while riding and camping where garden hose is not available to wash my rig and water is limited. Drivetrain and suspension are cleaned and lubed after every day of riding. All other parts could have a regular inspection and adjusting/tightening when needed. It still rides like new 😀

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