Magura EELECT electric fork

Forums Mountain Bike Forum Magura EELECT electric fork

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  captainkickstand 1 year, 2 months ago.

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  • #119356

    I’m on a roll today with the electric gizmos.

    Now for Magura’s EELECT front fork:

    Following RockShox and Fox, Magura has jumped into the electronic suspension game with a new auto-lockout technology called eLECT. It’s surprisingly simple, lightweight and, best of all, it actually seems to work.

    I’ve seen electric rear shocks, but this is the first I’ve seen of a non-prototype front fork.

    Not to sound curmudgeonly, but it seems we’re homogenizing all the character out of our rides. Kind of like comparing the magic age of early era racing to the "eveyone’s-got-identical-gear-because-it’s-scientifically-proven-to-be-0000000004%-more-efficient" stuff we’ve got going on now.

    Get off my lawn!

  • #119357

    They’ve gotta come up with something new/different to get us to keep dumping money into the industry, even if the product really isn’t any better!

    Anyone tried Magura forks? Their brakes aren’t bad.

  • #119358

    Interesting setup but I guess I just don’t understand why it’s necessary? Maybe I’m just old fashioned but I’m not really keen on electronic gizmo-magic. Except I do feel like in automotive racing the vehicles should at a minimum keep up with the times. Example: NASCAR just switched to fuel injection last year… wtf? 😮

  • #119359

    I have a hard enough time keeping forks functioning without electronic gizmos. More things to break isn’t very appearling. I would never use it but I have to give them props on an outside of the box design and implementation.

  • #119360

    Interesting concept, but why not take it a step further…No moving servo. Use Ferro fluid and a metered orifice with a fast acting current controlled electromagnet and a position sensor to take on full control of the dampening…

    Just sayin…

    This technology already exists…

  • #119361

    My issue with this tech is it chooses to stay locked or open based on incline – locks when you go uphill, opens up on the downhills. Incline doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with how bumpy the trail is though, there’s places on our local trails where you can go uphill very fast, and you don’t necessarily want your fork locked out. Also, what happens with high speed whoop-de-doos, where you’re going up/down/up/down/up/down over and over again?

    Fox’s Terralogic and Specialized’s BRAIN forks have been around for a while, and stay locked until you hit a bump, then open up – so they’re active when you need it, regardless of uphill or downhill. And they’re all mechanical, nothing electronic. I don’t see Magura’s EELECT being as usefull as either of these, and certainly not any better.

    All that said…if I were building up a new bike TODAY, I’d put a rigid fork on. I’m more and more leaning to the ‘less is more’ side of things 😆

  • #119362

    I am with dgaddis. less is more.

  • #119363
    All that said…if I were building up a new bike TODAY, I’d put a rigid fork on. I’m more and more leaning to the ‘less is more’ side of things

    Yes, but not everyone lives in Augusta 😀 For instance, I won’t ride in Pisgah without a full suspension bike. I know there are some badasses out there who will ride Pisgah on a hardtail, but for some reason I doubt even they would run a rigid fork down Pilot Rock…

    That said, I’m personally not a fan of electronic gizmos on mountain bikes. It just grates on me on a philosophical level…

    • #246995

      I’m opposed–maybe ‘skeptical’ is a better word–to electric bicycle parts on philosophical grounds, too. The beauty of a bicycle lines in the fact that all of the parts can be manipulated by human power and mechanical advantage. Once a part integral to the operation of the bike needs to be charged, you’re talking about a difference of kind and not just degree.

  • #119364
    "mtbgreg1" wrote
    All that said…if I were building up a new bike TODAY, I’d put a rigid fork on. I’m more and more leaning to the ‘less is more’ side of things

    Yes, but not everyone lives in Augusta 😀 For instance, I won’t ride in Pisgah without a full suspension bike. I know there are some badasses out there who will ride Pisgah on a hardtail, but for some reason I doubt even they would run a rigid fork down Pilot Rock…

    That said, I’m personally not a fan of electronic gizmos on mountain bikes. It just grates on me on a philosophical level…

    I think you’re confusing "need" and "want" 😉

    I’m not opposed to electric stuff, this just seems like poor use of it.

    Whenever Shimano brings Di2 the the dirt, I REALLY wanna try it.

  • #119365
    "dgaddis" wrote

    [quote="mtbgreg1":1pufvrwe]

    All that said…if I were building up a new bike TODAY, I’d put a rigid fork on. I’m more and more leaning to the ‘less is more’ side of things

    Yes, but not everyone lives in Augusta 😀 For instance, I won’t ride in Pisgah without a full suspension bike. I know there are some badasses out there who will ride Pisgah on a hardtail, but for some reason I doubt even they would run a rigid fork down Pilot Rock…

    That said, I’m personally not a fan of electronic gizmos on mountain bikes. It just grates on me on a philosophical level…

    I think you’re confusing "need" and "want" 😉

    I’m not opposed to electric stuff, this just seems like poor use of it.

    Whenever Shimano brings Di2 the the dirt, I REALLY wanna try it.[/quote:1pufvrwe]

    Let me rephrase: in Pisgah, I need suspension IF I don’t want to take my life into my hands every time I ride. 😉

  • #119366

    As neat as all this electronic wizardry is, I’m just waiting for magnetic ride control to filter its way down to motorcycles and then eventually bicycles 😼

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