help on making fast turns without loosing the front end.

Forums Mountain Bike Forum help on making fast turns without loosing the front end.

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Leppah 11 years ago.

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  • #75896

    hello i am kind of new and need some help in making fast turns. i keep getting pass by other guys and power wise i am ok but as soon as we start going fast into turns i start loosing my front end i have tried all different ways i know how and sometimes it works but most often i find my self correcting lines or going off or chasing my front end.. any help or comments will be great ..most of my riding is done at markham park oleta and amelia all in south florida…. 😮

  • #75897

    riding technique can make a big difference, but first let me ask qualifying questions on your equipment.

    What kind of bike set up do you have? Is it a XC bike or All Mountain? XC will corner better since the head angle helps keep the front tire more under you. All Mountain slacker head angle puts the front tire out in front more and you need to get a little more forward on the bike to keep weight on that front tire so it tracks.

    What kind of tires are you running? You may have tires with a lower outter edge bead. I run Kenda Nevagals and Tioga’s, both that corner great. Do some research on your tires.

    I’ve never ridden in Florida, but I would expect much of your trail surface to be sandy. Trail surface determines your riding technique.

    Some basic cornering tips. Layoff the brakes. If you do have to break, tap them before going into the turn, not in the turn. You want to be able to rail the turn and come out fast. Remember, it’s not how fast you enter a turn, but how fast you exit a turn. Learn to lean your bike, don’t steer. Make sure your outer pedal is down and inner pedal up through the turn and press your weight onto the outer pedal which will help your bike dig into the turn and rail the turn, all the weight on the outer pedal.

    That is for starters. Hope it helps! Go rail those turns and berms!

  • #75898

    Cornering is a big, big topic with so many variables.

    Flat turn, bermed turn, off camber turn – then add in the trail surface – loose, packed, etc.

    You can make your corner using an early, middle, or late apex as well as enter fast, exit slow, carry speed through out or enter slow and exit fast.

    Body position and lean also play a big role. Lean the body and bike as one, lean the body more than the bike, lean the bike more than the body.

    Rear braking can loosen the traction on the back tire causing it to skid around, helping to make a tight turn easier.

    It could take you years to figure all this out on your own – I highly recommend [i:22jc41f5]Mastering Mountain Bike Skills[/i:22jc41f5] by Brian Lopes and Lee McCormack (Amazon sells it).
    Great chapter covering all the various techniques for cornering.

    Welcome to Singletracks!

  • #75899
    "Jason_B." wrote

    Rear braking can loosen the traction on the back tire causing it to skid around, helping to make a tight turn easier.

    Trail builders will cringe to read this. It is true you can skid a corner to bring your back tire around faster and straighten out quicker, but skidding through corners really damages the trail. To save the life of the trail and to keep trail work hands riding and not repairing, avoid skidding or sliding by applying just a slight enough front brake pressure with your back brakes so that the back tire does not lock up and slide. Skidding disrupts soil, exposes roots and causes erosion and brake bumps.

  • #75900
    "Reserverockhopper" wrote

    [quote="Jason_B.":3rk2t8u3]

    Rear braking can loosen the traction on the back tire causing it to skid around, helping to make a tight turn easier.

    Trail builders will cringe to read this. It is true you can skid a corner to bring your back tire around faster and straighten out quicker, but skidding through corners really damages the trail. To save the life of the trail and to keep trail work hands riding and not repairing, avoid skidding or sliding by applying just a slight enough front brake pressure with your back brakes so that the back tire does not lock up and slide. Skidding disrupts soil, exposes roots and causes erosion and brake bumps.[/quote:3rk2t8u3]I understand that, but if it comes to me hitting a tree or the trail getting a skid mark, the trail is going to see a skid mark.

    The more tools one has in their tool kit, the better prepared they are going to be.

    Almost every book or video I’ve watched on cornering mentions this as a viable technique hence my mentioning it – I’m certainly not encouraging anyone to go skid up their local trail.

    On another note, this also should drive home the point of not braking in a corner as braking causes a loss of traction and cornering requires good traction – can’t have both so lay off the brakes (as you mentioned earlier) and rail that turn (load or weight your bike in the turn to get extra traction).

    Also learn to counter steer – great for carving a corner.

    As a cave diver, I know all about conservation but one also needs to understand that if conservation was 100% your concern, you wouldn’t be out on the trail (or in a cave) at all as your presence in any form will have negative impacts (however small).

  • #75901

    "How to" books and bike porn marketing, can sometimes be hypocritical. How many times have you seen a product or bike pictured covered with mud? But we all know to avoid the trails when wet, yet major product manufactures and bike mags run images all the time of muddy races or bikes covered.

    I would would say many videos or how to books are likely focusing on how to improve racing speeds. Skidding into a corner while avoidable, is likely to occur on race day. Most trail advocates understand that their trail is going to take more of a beating on race day. But we don’t want every rider on in between rides, use skidding as a way to corner every turn.

    I have to beg to differ on using the trail as anti-conservatism. Those who use open lands, tend to be the strongest advocates at preserving them. If no one rode the trails, then no one would fight to maintain access and eventually land managers would develop them. I don’t hunt, but I recognize that hunters are major land access advocates. I bet as a cave diver, you are part of, or there is an organization that promotes cave diving access and advocacy. But now we’re getting off topic.

    Brake before the turn!

  • #75902

    thanks guys for some of the info by the way i did try and started to lean the shoulder into the turn while putting some weight also and started to go a lot faster and even do the front end got loose a couple of times since i was putting weight into the turn it hook back up right away …something else the bike i was riding was a hard tail giant xtc1 and i like the bike but just sold it today and bought a 2009 specialized xc expert wich it is a dual susp bike and need to start to learn how to ride it now again …. 😀

  • #75903

    I had the same problem earlier this year and also was riding a hardtail although I think it could happen on any bike.
    I installed a longer stem, about an inch I think, and then moved my seat forward thus moving my weight slightly forward and giving the front wheel a bit more bite. Learning to lean into the turns also helps.
    All the above info comes into play also as there are many different variables and just as many techniques, just keep trying and find the combo that works for you.

  • #75904

    Sounds like you are leaning back too far in the turns and probably coming close to locking your elbows. To turn fast, you need to be in an attack position with your elbow bent and outward, and your back less vertical. You have to put some weight on the front wheel in order to have traction. When you come up on the turn, slowly apply the brakes, lean in a little, lean the bike more than your body, keep your outside foot down, then come off the brakes as you hit the apex. You gotta be smooth. You almost want to lean the bike underneath you while you are standing above it.

    Check out http://www.leelikesbikes.com Go to the clinic section and you’ll see pictures of him turning correctly in a parking lot.

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