Headstock spacers?

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    • #81500

      I was looking at my bike today, and I noticed what looked to be headstock spacers(see pic below) That led me to wonder what it would be like if one or all of them were removed. I have noticed that alot of MTBs have lower handle bars compared to the saddle height, yet that could be just fram design. Nevertheless I am a "Curious George", and I wonder if removing those ??spacers?? would give me some sort of advantage? My bike is also more or less a comfort MTB not really designed with racing or performance to the max in mind so those ??spacers?? may be in there to help comfort?? Maybe I am onto something, but I am probably not .. lol

      Thanks in advance =)

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    • #81501

      Without cutting the steetrer tube,you can take those spacers out and then slide your stem on first and then put the spacer’s on after the stem and then you can see how that feels for ya when riding.That’s what there for,so you can adjust the height of your stem,handle bars.You can also put one spacer on first and then the stem and then the other spacer on top for a different set up and height so you can get your handle bars at the height you want and need.I had to raise my stumpjumper stem when I bought it but that might or could change down the road as I learn to ride and get use to my bike as time moves on.
      You can also experiment with different rise handle bars,and in EXTREME conditions you can buy another fork without the steerer tube cut so as to have the stem even higher,but that would be really extreme but helps drive the idea home of the adjusteble stem and spacers.

    • #81502

      Thanks for the reply I see what you mean. Does dropping the height of the HB`s give any performance gain or is just for fitment?

    • #81503
      "ChiliPepper" wrote

      They are called….."Headset Spacers" not "Headstock Spacers". No worries, we all had to start at the beginning sometime.

      Anyways, Steve is very correct and too the point. Whatever you do….."DO NOT cut the steerer tube", just play around with re-positioning the spacers. Thats all bro!

      [quote="Shane_Thompson86":oqli8704]Thanks for the reply I see what you mean. Does dropping the height of the HB`s give any performance gain or is just for fitment?

      Its a personal preference really that you will need to find out on your own with re-positioning the spacers and riding for feel.[/quote:oqli8704]

      So, if I remove one, I will have that steerer rod to deal with? It will be poking through the underside of the shock threatining to poke the tire?

    • #81504
      So, if I remove one, I will have that steerer rod to deal with? It will be poking through the underside of the shock threatining to poke the tire?

      No No,the steerer tube itself does not adjust or change.The stem and spacers work together like a team to change or adjust the height of the handlebars.The handle bars or the stem are the ONLY parts that change in height and the spacers HAVE to still be in there somwhere to compensate for empty space in order for the top cap to preload the bearings.If you took a spacer out and left it out,your stem and handle bars and the left over spacers would just flop around on your steerer tube.

    • #81505

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      there it is. So yea I see what you mean. I guess thats pretty dangergous to have that sticking up. Nevertheless cutting the steering tube would be a pain with my fork, for the threads deal would have to be re welded to the knew shortened tube.

      Um is there any possibilties in reversering that headset?? I could re add the spacers and reverse the headset, and be back at that same level.

    • #81506
      Nevertheless cutting the steering tube would be a pain with my fork, for the threads deal would have to be re welded to the knew shortened tube.

      What do you mean?

      Um is there any possibilties in reversering that headset??

      Do you mean put it back the way it was?Yeah,you can change it back to the way it was.??

    • #81507
      "steve32300" wrote
      Nevertheless cutting the steering tube would be a pain with my fork, for the threads deal would have to be re welded to the knew shortened tube.

      What do you mean?

      [quote:a5kn24b3]Um is there any possibilties in reversering that headset??

      Do you mean put it back the way it was?Yeah,you can change it back to the way it was.??[/quote:a5kn24b3]

      It can not be shortened because the the thing the steering cap screws into is welded to the top of the steering post. So if i cut below those welds I have no where to screw that cap in.

      Reverse as in flip the headstock. flip it over so it sicks down instead of up.

    • #81508

      I rode it just not without the spacers and it feels no differnt to me.

    • #81509
      "Shane_Thompson86" wrote

      It can not be shortened because the the thing the steering cap screws into is welded to the top of the steering post. So if i cut below those welds I have no where to screw that cap in.

      That is called a star nut, and cutting the steerer tube down would necessitate installing a new one, or re-installing the old one if you’re clever. Either way, there is a special tool for it.

      I had my LBS cut down one of mine and re-install the start nut, for which they charged me $8.00.

      I cut the other one, but couldn’t get the nut to re-seat, so had them do that, for which they charged $5.00, which included the nut and the labor.

      As for positioning, a lower handlebar generally facilitates a stronger, but more tiring, pedaling stance, while a higher bar provides a more relaxed ride, but with less ability to drive power to the crank arms.

    • #81510
      "maddslacker" wrote

      [quote="Shane_Thompson86":3s3wcn98]

      As for positioning, a lower handlebar generally facilitates a stronger, but more tiring, pedaling stance, while a higher bar provides a more relaxed ride, but with less ability to drive power to the crank arms.

      [/quote:3s3wcn98]

      I rode yesterday with the spacers out, and your right. The riding postition was a bit more uncomfortable, but I was able to put down more power. I rather deal with a touch of uncomfortablenesszz in exchange for being able to power up stuff better.

    • #81511
      "Shane_Thompson86" wrote

      I rode yesterday with the spacers out, and your right. The riding postition was a bit more uncomfortable, but I was able to put down more power. I rather deal with a touch of uncomfortableness in exchange for being able to power up stuff better.

      Not my first time… 😉

      Seriously though, I raised the bars a bit on my work commuter to give a more upright pedaling position. On this bike I don’t need the extra power, and I’m on the bike about three hours round trip so I like the comfort.

      On my mountain bike I installed them pretty low, and left myself room to go even lower if I choose to after riding it a while.

      **It’s much easier to make the steerer shorter than it is to make it longer again** 😆

      Overall, for aggressive offroad riding, lower is better because you need the power, and you’ll get used to the body positioning pretty quickly

    • #81512
      I rode yesterday with the spacers out, and your right. The riding postition was a bit more uncomfortable, but I was able to put down more power. I rather deal with a touch of uncomfortablenesszz in exchange for being able to power up stuff better.

      The lower your handle bars,the more of a cross country or road bike style you will have,which is a more efficiant pedaling positoion.
      The higher the handle bars,the more off road style or BMX style if you will.

      That’s the way I look at it,and since I come from BMX I ride with my stem and handle bars up higher in order to use those off road skills like bunny hopping,manuals,and generally navigating technical stuff,where as riding with the lower stem and handle bars pretty much leaves you at pedaling efficiancy alone because the bars are too low to ride and use those technical skills very well.That’s me though,I totally prefer the off road style over the XC or road style of riding,I love to ride technical stuff and couldnt do that if I rode in a XC or road style.

    • #81513
      "steve32300" wrote
      I rode yesterday with the spacers out, and your right. The riding postition was a bit more uncomfortable, but I was able to put down more power. I rather deal with a touch of uncomfortablenesszz in exchange for being able to power up stuff better.

      The lower your handle bars,the more of a cross country or road bike style you will have,which is a more efficiant pedaling positoion.
      The higher the handle bars,the more off road style or BMX style if you will.

      That’s the way I look at it,and since I come from BMX I ride with my stem and handle bars up higher in order to use those off road skills like bunny hopping,manuals,and generally navigating technical stuff,where as riding with the lower stem and handle bars pretty much leaves you at pedaling efficiancy alone because the bars are too low to ride and use those technical skills very well.That’s me though,I totally prefer the off road style over the XC or road style of riding,I love to ride technical stuff and couldnt do that if I rode in a XC or road style.

      Thats what I was thinking. The lower the bars the harder it would be to Manual or ride wheelies, But I have not noticed a hold up yet.

    • #81514

      I find the extra power from lower bars to be crucial for powering through technical stuff.

    • #81515
      "maddslacker" wrote

      I find the extra power from lower bars to be crucial for powering through technical stuff.

      It helped my riding alot. I also can ride wheelies better and bunny hop. atleast I think I can "better" 😉

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