Grease vs. Anti-seize compound

Forums Mountain Bike Forum Grease vs. Anti-seize compound

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    • #79057

      Just need some clarification on where I should use the two. Also about how often should I apply?

      I want to go ahead and try to do all the lubing on my bike this year, so I want to make sure I don’t use the wrong stuff, ya know? Anyways the frame is aluminum.

    • #79058

      I would have to say to refer back to the directions on your specific components to be sure of the type of lubricant to use. So many different products out there call for a specific type of lubricant that it’s almost impossible to make a "one for all" lube. Different components also rely on different properties to get desired results. I personally wouldn’t use anti seize to lube up my headset or repack bearings.

      In any case, I find that I use the Park Tools polylube more often than other lubricants that I own.

      Good luck.

    • #79059

      Oh, thanks, I didn’t necessarily mean that I was going to lube with it! haha, I was thinking more along the lines of using it when I replace my cassette and put some on the hub splines. haha. Anyways thanks you guys

    • #79060

      Just want to add my two cents. I am posting a few links on what I use for anti seizing.

      http://www.permatex.com/products/Automo … ricant.htm

      Basically I use that stuff for almost all the components on the bike..Everything from seatpost mast, BB bearings, wheel bearings, Headset bearings, to lube the shaft on the inside of my Joplin seatpost.

      For my chain I use Chain specific lube that self cleans.

      For pulleys and cassette, I use Shimano’s special freehub grease.

      All the swivel points on my derailleurs are lubed with a ceramic based chain oil.

      And loctite Thread locker (blue) for disk bolts, BB cups, Brake levers, shifter pods.

      Forks well thats another story which I best leave for another article on rebuilding and servicing your fork.

    • #79061

      Anti -seize is not for locking down threads. It is a type of lube. It is to keep from galling the threads when you put things together.
      Thread locker is what you use to keep things from coming apart. There are different levels of thread locker. The red stuff is for stuff you never want to take apart, then there is green for things you may need to take apart and then there is blue for stuff you know you will need to take apart. Blue is mostly just gummy when it dries.

    • #79062
      "LarryGScott" wrote

      Anti -seize is not for locking down threads. It is a type of lube. It is to keep from galling the threads when you put things together.
      Thread locker is what you use to keep things from coming apart. There are different levels of thread locker. The red stuff is for stuff you never want to take apart, then there is green for things you may need to take apart and then there is blue for stuff you know you will need to take apart. Blue is mostly just gummy when it dries.

      I agree, anti-seize is frequently applied to the caliper bolts on car brakes so that they can be removed at a later time without rusting in place. There are other applications for it, but that’s the first one that comes to mind.

      I honestly can’t think of a viable application for anti-seize on a bicycle.

      Thread lock products are not a lubricant at all, and are simply meant to keep bolts that are subject to high vibration, or that can’t be torqued super tight for whatever reason, from loosening over time, yet the bolts can be easily loosened with the proper tool. The most common use of thread lock on a bike would be the brake rotor bolts.

      Back to the original question: I use automotive wheel bearing grease on my headset bearings, and for the suspension pivots, check your manufacturer or LBS for what they recommend for your particular bike model.

    • #79063

      We use anti seize on the spark plugs on the race car,the heads are aluminum and with the heat the plugs will seize themselves in the threads if you do not coat them with anti seize.That is the biggest reason for anti seize,although you can use it for other things as well,and there are different anti seizes for different heat ratings.I’m no expert on the stuff but it works pretty darn good.

    • #79064

      sweet, that just kinda made it even more clear. Always appreciate hearing from more people, tend to learn more that way, anyways thanks again guys.

    • #79065

      I was gonna mention Anti-sieze on spark plugs as well,I try to use it every time on my car since the head is also aluminum and stripping one of those is not an option.

      I liked the idea of it on the cassette on the hub or any other bare metal to metal contact that will be stationary for awhile.If the hub was powdercoated where the cassette went over it,I would not use it,the powdercoating will prevent metal to metal contact.

      I use WD-40 for everything around the house…have never used it for a bike.

      I’ve always used the wet chain lube and kept it clean.

    • #79066

      I only use anti seize on my Ti bolts. Other than that I don’t use it.

    • #79067

      what is it this video shows anti-seize being used?

      http://www.mtbiker.co.za/videos/phennin … n-assembly

    • #79068

      muddtracks mentioned earlier about it not being used on a bike.
      this vid shows antiseize being applied. however from what i’ve heard the antiseize is crappy and really should be replaced with a different compound. does the factory always know best anyway?

    • #79069

      Usually you use the anti seize when two different metals are being used to prevent corrosion and where you have extreme heat cycles where normal lubes would break down. I have never used the copper based stuff in the video however, just the silver graphite based stuff from Permatek. It could make a stellar lubricant! I am actually quite curious about it now!

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