Dropper SeatPost – Worth it?

Forums Mountain Bike Forum Dropper SeatPost – Worth it?

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    • #94716

      I have been considering the purchase of a dropper seatpost. I can see why it would be advantageous to have, but I have never used one so am wondering if its worth the $250 plus investment. Also, I am curious about the different types and how they work. Are they essentially like a pneumatic office chair? By that, I mean do you have to take your weight off for them to come up. Any suggestions on what brand and type is the best option.

      I apologize if there already is a post on this subject, I wasn’t able to find much discussion on it.

    • #94717

      It depends on your height, and is generally more valuable if you’re taller. My friend id 6’4" and he loves his. I’m 5’8" with a 30" inseam and I have no use for one.

    • #94718

      I think its all preference. I would say I am around 5’8ish as well. What kind of trails to you ride. I typically climb for the downhill and before I had the post I always would drop it at the top of a downhill anyways so it just made since. Yes there are trails I don’t really need a drop on but its a great tool to have. The weight isn’t that huge and the function to me is more important. I ride a pretty stock enduro, with carbon bars and a drop post, putting me at about 30lbs total.

      I purchased the Specialized Command post at cost of around $300. I think it was worth every penny. It have 3 settings. All the way up, down and a midpoint. I don’t use the mid point as much as the others tho. I’d say look at what others are riding in your area to see if its a common thing. In Tahoe there are quite a bit of us drop seats up here.

      Good luck on your choice.

    • #94719

      I have the Specialized command seat dropper and paid $325.00 for it,I like it and it is pretty solidly built.The specialized command seat post had a few problems when it came out although specialized has done a great job keeping up with and fixing the problems.I pretty much bought the specialized command post because I own a specialized stumpjumper.
      Is it worth it???Well,,,,,,yes it is worth it.And yes they work like a pneumatic office chair,hahahhaa.The command seat post by specialized works from air preasure to raise the seat and uses a 3 position locking height adjustment,100 mm height range,remote handlebar mount,30.9mm outer diameter so make sure you get a seat post that fits your seat tube ID.I don’t have experience with any other seat dropper although they are very popular these days and the consumer demand has driven the quality and options up the scale.The price is the biggest show stopper so it is up to you,I admit I thought long and hard before I bought mine,although I feel pretty good about it as long as it works.

    • #94720
      "elvandi" wrote

      I have been considering the purchase of a dropper seatpost. I can see why it would be advantageous to have, but I have never used one so am wondering if its worth the $250 plus investment. Also, I am curious about the different types and how they work. Are they essentially like a pneumatic office chair? By that, I mean do you have to take your weight off for them to come up. Any suggestions on what brand and type is the best option.

      I apologize if there already is a post on this subject, I wasn’t able to find much discussion on it.

      As I’ve been learning in my economics class, whether or not it is worth it to you is entirely dependent on you… we can’t tell you that. In economics they call it your "marginal benefit." If you’re going to get $250 worth of satisfaction and use out of it, then go for it. If not, don’t.

      I personally would love a seat dropper but not enough to spend $250.

      It’s all personal choice man.

    • #94721

      I don’t mean to sound like a dummy but what does your height have to do with it? I mean…the idea is to get the seat out of your way on downhill and tech stuff right? I’m kind of interested in one also.

    • #94722

      My legs are so short that my center of gravity is already low so I don’t really need to drop the seat. My bike’s geometry is also such that I can easily get behind the seat if I get on something really steep.

      If I’m in for a lot of downhill, I will lower it maybe 1" but it’s really just psychological at that point, not really necessary

      My friend is 6’4" with legs as long as all of me, and he is waaaay up in the air. He needs to drop his seat a lot to feel comfortable on steep downhill.

      Maybe this pic will put it in perspective:
      Image

    • #94723

      Dang! You sure he’s not 6’8"! Just joking but I see what you mean. I’m between 5’9" – 5’10" and I’ve always done exactly what you described. Used to ride with my seat a little too high but I began to let it down some and so most times I can get back on it where I need to unless its really steep. Just have heard so much about these seat posts lately that it makes me wonder if it would be cool to be able to let it up and down easier and maybe improve riding in some places where I wouldn’t normally take the time to stop. thanks!

    • #94724

      His is amazing. It drops from where you see it in that pic to about 2" above the frame, with the press of a button.

      Anyway, overall height is not the only factor. I’m 5’8" with a long torso and short legs. My ‘normal’ riding position is already low and back, if that makes sense.

    • #94725

      Yeah, you don’t have much trouble getting into the "attack" position I guess.

    • #94726

      Exactly my earlier point!

    • #94727

      It depends largely on the type of terrain you ride. If there’s not a lot of techncial descending on your rides, you probably don’t need one. Even if there is a lot of technical descending, you may not need one if your ride has all the climb up front and all the descent to finish, thus requiring only one manual drop of the post.

      However, if your ride has a lot of transitions, that quick lever on the handlebar can be very convenient. Even though most of my rides are all up then all down, I decided I had to have one after demoing a bike with one at Gooseberry Mesa where you’re constantly rollercoastering. It’s also perfect for Palmer Park here in Colorado Springs. It’d also be quite useful for those trips to Fruita.

      I have ridden the Gravity Dropper and the Crank Brothers Joplin and they are both great units. I ended up with a Joplin on my All-Mountain bike.

      Assess the type of riding you do, how often you would want/need to change seat post height, and how important it is for you do do it on the fly, and then you should have your answer. I will add that everyone I know who has one says it was more than worth the investment.

    • #94728

      Just received a Gravity Dropper seat post for Christmas and I love it!!!. Very useful here in Southern California. The ability to go up and down at will has really allowed me to clear things both going up and down that were much more difficult to do before the seat post. Having read many negative reviews about the hydraulic and air sprung posts, leaking, slipping etc. I went with the fully mechanical Gravity Dropper. What I didn’t realize was that you can buy different inner tubes for the seat post that change how much drop you get, 2,3,4,and 5 inches. Each inner tube is $30.00. Mine originally came with 4 inches of drop and I then purchased a 2 inch drop inner tube, better for my use. No leaks, no sticking, rock solid and they will rebuild you post for $15.00. Love it!! I rode for many years without it, but this is one of the few, "advancements" in mountain biking that truly in my mind makes a real difference.

    • #238271

      <p>Forgive me for asking, is it worth getting one for my hardtail?</p><p>Am about 5’8″ </p>

    • #238453

      @bikecowboy: “I have been considering the purchase of a dropper seatpost. I can see why it would be advantageous to have, but I have never used one so am wondering if its worth the $250 plus investment. Also, I am curious about the different types and how they work. Are they essentially like a pneumatic office chair? By that, I mean do you have to take your weight off for them to come up. Any suggestions on what brand and type is the best option.

      I apologize if there already is a post on this subject, I wasn’t able to find much discussion on it”

      • Why do you have to spend $250? You can get a new one from Chain Reaction for at most $173.
      • Most are a simple air cartridge affair that use a cable-actuated trigger and yes they are similar to an office chair.
      • They are extraordinarily intuitive to use…Push the lever with your weight on the seat to lower it to get rad-tastic. Push it again with your weight off the seat to raise it for climbing.

      I’ve likely been on dropper posts longer than anyone on this forum having installed my first one over a dozen years ago. At the time as everyone scoffed at them I declared that everyone will have them on their bikes and now they do. I believe dropper posts to be as important as disc brakes in the mountain bike invention hall of fame. I use mine constantly throughout every ride and I would not own a trail bike (hard tail or full suspension) without one. I will not even bother to justify any of it as I have heard every argument against them for years. Do whatever turns you on.

    • #238469

      I ditched my dropper after finding that I just wasn’t using it. I was able to descend confidently, at speed, with or without the dropper.

    • #238473

      Mine dropper post broke. So I bought a new bicycle to get one “free”.

    • #238476

      @CorreyMaddocks: “It depends on your height, and is generally more valuable if you’re taller. My friend id 6’4″ and he loves his. I’m 5’8″ with a 30″ inseam and I have no use for one.”

      Sorry, not sorry, but I have to call bs on this. I happen to be an inch taller than you with the same build mentioned and I run a 150mm dropper post. I also happen to know riders (women and kids) at five feet and under that run dropper posts without any issues and would not go back to riding w/o one. I will give you that one may not be able to run as much drop depending on their pedaling position, available seat tube length or frame design. However, most riders’ pedaling position is generally just shy of their inseam length. I can promise anyone out there that if you go find the steepest descent of a trail you ride, you will ride it more comfortably, safer, and faster without having a seat up yr tuchus. Try it both ways and time yrself. A dropper post makes this WAY more efficient.

      Speaking of efficiency, I hate to mention racing, but oh well. Enduro racing is all about hauling mail on (stages) sections of trails that are mostly downhill. Key word is “mostly” as there pedaling sections in every timed stage. You will not find any pro EWS racers not employing a dropper as it allows them to quickly have their pedaling position at the ready and obviously their seat the hell outta the way in split seconds (which is difference often between being on the podium or not). Enduro racing has become arguably the most popular pursuit across the mountain bike spectrum and for good reason. It resembles what most people’s everyday rides are like more than any other style of racing.

      Now, that said are any of you going to become Rude, Hill or Ravanel? Probably not, but that does not mean you will not benefit (have more fun) on your rides by utilizing some of the same tools they do. Once again, ride whatever turns you on.

    • #238478

      I am a new owner of a dropper and wonder why I did without it all along.  Not only do I think it makes me a more capable rider, I feel it is a real safety device.  If used, it will prevent otb’s on the bike.   Now looking to get one for my wife’s bike.  Do it, you won’t regret it.

    • #238564

      When I got my new bike this past fall, I refused to use my dropper that came with it. Told myself that there is absolutely no reason to have one and that I should be able to do everything with the post in it’s normal riding position, and if I couldn’t, then I had to get better. Well here we are 6 months later and I can truly say I hate riding without one. My raceface turbine is in for warranty work at the moment. So I purchased brand x ascend post from chain reaction but have yet to put it on (waiting to get my rear wheel rebuilt from the shop). Now I will have 2 and will never be without one. I don’t use it so much for downhill sections, except super steep stuff. But when I see a down tree across the trail, instead of approaching slowly and rolling over, I simply drop the post and bunnyhop the obstacle without ever hitting the brakes. It’s way more fun!

      On a side note, I was really close to purchasing a fox transfer post. But upon further research I realized that there isn’t one single dropper post that doesn’t have its issues. So why spend $350 when I can spend $150 for the same thing. I also purchased the wolf tooth light action remote which I think will go nicely with the brand x post.

    • #238577

      I would give up my rear suspension before giving up my dropper post.

      I find that it’s a matter of efficiency more than anything else. Leave it at full height for efficient climbing, and get it out of the way for gnarly stuff. In varied terrain I find myself constantly adjusting it without thinking about it. Up a little for this section, down a bit for that. It’s intuitive and keeps my butt in just the right place to conserve pedaling energy wherever possible.

      BTW I’m 5’11” and use a Crank Brothers Highline which has worked perfectly since I bought it last year.

      Ivan

    • #238607

      FWIW, I believe droppers are one of the most useful upgrades one can make (almost as much a no-brainer as going tubeless IMO) and most will find an almost immediate positive impact.

      If used, it will prevent otb’s on the bike.

      Triton: While I completely agree that a dropper significant reduces the likelihood over going OTBs (by dropping down you can lower your center of gravity) unfortunately I have firsthand experience that a dropper won’t prevent an endo.  But I’ll chalk up my most recent superman to rider misjudging the balance of speed vs skill 😉

       

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