Buying Your First Mountain Bike? What and what not to do

Forums Mountain Bike Forum Buying Your First Mountain Bike? What and what not to do

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    • #88472

      Hey guys, wanted to let you know about a series that I’m going to be running on my blog over the next week. I’m hoping to provide some valuable information and advice:

      After participating in multiple online mountain bike forums for several years, I have noticed there is a general question that keeps getting asked over and over again. It can take many forms, but it boils down to the same general subject. This basic question can be asked as:

      * I want to start mountain biking. How important is having a name-brand bike?
      * I only have x amount of money. What is the best bike that I can get?
      * Why shouldn’t I buy a full suspension bike from Walmart for $150 dollars, instead of a hardtail from the bike shop for $300?
      * I bought a Next a month ago, and _______ is loose/broken, PLEASE HELP!
      * Why do experience mountain bikers always get all snobby whenever they see me riding my "Walmart Special?"

      The above questions will be answered through a 5-part series released over the next 5 days:

      * What is wrong with Walmart bicycles? — Walmart bikes are crap.
      * Personal Experience with Wally World Bikes— It’s not good.
      * "What should I do if I can’t shop at Walmart?" — Shop around for a good deal on a used hardtail from a reputable brand.
      * A Note About Mongoose — Some are really nice, some are not so nice.
      * Just Ride What You Want to Ride — In the end, mountain biking is about getting out and having fun on your bike. Sometimes people get too hung up on what bike they’re riding, what component isn’t as nice as they’d like it to be, or what isn’t working right.

      I think that over the course of this series, I hope to present a pretty all-encompassing view of the issue. Sure, some of the initial posts may be on the harsher end, but I think the last couple of posts will bring more balance to the issue. As the series progress I will update this post with links to the individual articles. Check back daily for the next installment, and I would love to hear what you think about the issue!

      From here: [url:3aukvl7c]http://www.gregridestrails.com/2010/03/buying-your-first-mountain-bike-heres.html[/url:3aukvl7c]

      PS Please keep it civil 😀

      Image

    • #88473

      thank god someone finally did this!

      i think if more people were educated no one would buy the crap that you get from walmart and would force them to make bikes of a higher standard!

      also ride tomorrow?

    • #88474

      Nice idea Greg. Get this up & going and Ill surely link to it from my blog, which Im trying to steer more MTB focused.

      I find it very hard to get folks, especially older folks, to understand about bikes/value/quality/fit/?.
      I have a cousin riding a rockhopper that is tremendously old and complains about riding every time. “How on earth could this be considered fun?’ he says- I try to explain the advancements in bike technology that have been made over the past two decades he kind of gets it but then cant figure out why he cant purchase a bike with said technology for the same price he paid for his now antique with 4 moving parts in 1980-something…. And he doesn’t want to work on it. At this point I have all but given up, refuse to ride with him and am considering a name change.
      But I know he’s not the only one, every time someone asks ‘why does my back hurt?’ ‘Your bike doesn’t fit you.’ ‘Ill raise my seat.’ – Ive found at this point its best to make an excuse and exit stage left… Not trying to be the Biker-Snob, just trying to avoid an argument.
      Thing is, everyone knows how to ride a bicycle. Not very many people have ever educated themselves on the subject beyond that point. Thanks for taking this on.

    • #88475
      "AK_Dan" wrote

      Nice idea Greg. Get this up & going and Ill surely link to it from my blog, which Im trying to steer more MTB focused.

      I find it very hard to get folks, especially older folks, to understand about bikes/value/quality/fit/?.
      I have a cousin riding a rockhopper that is tremendously old and complains about riding every time. “How on earth could this be considered fun?’ he says- I try to explain the advancements in bike technology that have been made over the past two decades he kind of gets it but then cant figure out why he cant purchase a bike with said technology for the same price he paid for his now antique with 4 moving parts in 1980-something…. And he doesn’t want to work on it. At this point I have all but given up, refuse to ride with him and am considering a name change.
      But I know he’s not the only one, every time someone asks ‘why does my back hurt?’ ‘Your bike doesn’t fit you.’ ‘Ill raise my seat.’ – Ive found at this point its best to make an excuse and exit stage left… Not trying to be the Biker-Snob, just trying to avoid an argument.
      Thing is, everyone knows how to ride a bicycle. Not very many people have ever educated themselves on the subject beyond that point. Thanks for taking this on.

      Hey Ak_Dan, if you have anything that you want to contribute, shoot it my way and I’ll work it in.

      I don’t think I’ve written much about proper bike fit. I was thinking of including a short ghetto-fit routine, but if you want to cover the concept more indepth, shoot me a pm or something and we can do a guest blog type thing.

      "FBTrek321" wrote

      thank god someone finally did this!

      i think if more people were educated no one would buy the crap that you get from walmart and would force them to make bikes of a higher standard!

      also ride tomorrow?

      Yep I’m planning on it! Im hoping the trails will be open.

    • #88476

      trails are open today and tomorrow is suppose to be sunny and 68°! so should be a fun ride, maybe i can keep up better this time…

    • #88477

      There always seems to be one major problem with threads like this that people don’t seem to [i:33upc9lo]Get[/i:33upc9lo].

      There is always going to be [i:33upc9lo]someone[/i:33upc9lo] out there who wants to interject and provide their experience as the [i:33upc9lo]exception.[/i:33upc9lo] This itself is not a problem. Hell, I’m GLAD that SOMEONE out there has had good luck with their Walmart bike. To me it’s like seeing someone win the lottery. Good Job!! Lucky You!! I’m happy for you. But, people tend to see that and then think, "hey, I’m going to try my chances as well." FAR too often these guys who also decided to try their luck come back posting about issues they have and then get mad when people say things that basically amount to "I told you so."

      If you didn’t know any better when you made the purchase, then I have NO problem with you doing a [i:33upc9lo]little[/i:33upc9lo] complaining later. BUT, if you were fore-warned and still decided to make that decision, I don’t want to here a word! You made your own bed. Think of the guys who spent a lot of money and time making their bike purchase and STILL have some of the same problems. Those are the guys I REALLY feel for. They did what they were supposed to do and still got screwed.

      I think you may actually be able to steer a few folks in the right direction as long as you keep your blog level headed and fair. You might want to rethink the begining blog posts if you already know they are going to come across as harsh. It makes it seem like you have an axe to grind and people simply stop listening. Remember, the guys who will really benefit from that info are the ones who have no idea one way or the other and haven’t already made a purchase. If you really want to steer these guys in the right direction a gentle nudge coupled with lots of patient explanation goes MUCH further than slamming your hand down on the table and saying "they suck and the parts are crap." Some newbs actually DO want to educate themselves and veteran riders should be there for those guys and pass on the wisdom. Sometimes, older riders just need some encouragement to get with the program, as well.

    • #88478
      "FBTrek321" wrote

      trails are open today and tomorrow is suppose to be sunny and 68°! so should be a fun ride, maybe i can keep up better this time…

      Sweet, sounds good! I just hope I’M up to the task. My back has been feeling like crap lately, I don’t know what it is. Thought it wasn’t enough cross training, but I’ve been off the bike, stretching more, and focusing on core/back exercises… but it still hurts.

      Anyhow, back on topic.

      @ GoldenGoose,
      I just proofread and edited my post for tomorrow. I think it is a fair appraisal of the issue "What is wrong with Walmart bicycles?"

    • #88479

      2nd installment in the series:

      Let me break it down for you quickly, just so it’s clear: Walmart bikes are crap.

      Why is this so? The bike sold at your average department store (Walmart, Target, K-mart, etc) is cheap. In mountain biking (as with many things in life), you usually get what you pay for.

      Continue reading….

      Image

    • #88480

      My personal experience was bad with a Walmart bike, specifically a Next. Cost me literally 70 dollars and was as happy as a clam. First ride was something like 10 miles, everything went good. The ride was on road, never even dawned on me back then to ride off road with it. Every ride after that my non drive side crank arm would fall off. Started getting some ghost shifting for no real reason. After it sat around for a few years, my roommate and now best friend/biking buddy got me into wanting to ride. So I took my bike off road, which was a bad idea. Ghost shifting is horribly frustrating when riding a trail. My crank arm fell off and we were unable to find the nut that holds it on. Ended up using one of the nuts the held the front wheel on. So I literally road home with one nut holding my front wheel on. My back wheel was so out of tru that I had to disconnect my rear brake just so I could peddle.

      That was my last experience on that bike. My room mates brother donated to me a old Rigid Steel Schwinn Single speed, until I started to build my first bike.

    • #88481
      "Vtolds" wrote

      My personal experience was bad with a Walmart bike, specifically a Next. Cost me literally 70 dollars and was as happy as a clam. First ride was something like 10 miles, everything went good. The ride was on road, never even dawned on me back then to ride off road with it. Every ride after that my non drive side crank arm would fall off. Started getting some ghost shifting for no real reason. After it sat around for a few years, my roommate and now best friend/biking buddy got me into wanting to ride. So I took my bike off road, which was a bad idea. Ghost shifting is horribly frustrating when riding a trail. My crank arm fell off and we were unable to find the nut that holds it on. Ended up using one of the nuts the held the front wheel on. So I literally road home with one nut holding my front wheel on. My back wheel was so out of tru that I had to disconnect my rear brake just so I could peddle.

      That was my last experience on that bike. My room mates brother donated to me a old Rigid Steel Schwinn Single speed, until I started to build my first bike.

      Good story man, that’s a classic! Tomorrow I will be talking about some of the experiences I’ve had with walmart bikes. Fortunately, I haven’t had the displeasure of owning any!

    • #88482

      Before I went to college I had a Trek BMX with red tires on it. Didn’t want to take it to college, because it looked rediculous. So I bought a $60 Mongoose hardtail at Wal-Mart. I knew it was a piece, but figured it would be good enough to get me around campus.

      WRONG.

      2nd day I had the bike, I tacoed the rear wheel on a curb. I was going walking pace, picked the front tire up onto the sidewalk, and was going to let the rear tire just roll on up…and it tacoed.

      The wheel wouldn’t even turn in the frame it was so bad. So then I had a walk of shame 1/4 of a mile to my next class, dragging the bike alongside me, with the rear wheel locked up.

      Next time I went back home, I brough the red tired BMX back to school with me. The Trek lived for two years at school. Staying locked up outside (bikes weren’t allowed inside the dorms) all the time, and getting thrashed around campus on our street riding sessions nearly every night. Eventually the rear hub started to lock up. And the fork was tweaked, as were the cranks, so I bought a new BMX.

      EDIT – oh yeah, a tip for your blog series, be sure you touch on how a bike shop bike is built by people who know what they’re doing. I’ve seen bikes at walmart with loose parts, backwards forks, brakes that are so poorly adjusted the pads don’t even touch the rim, etc.

    • #88483
      "Vtolds" wrote

      My personal experience was bad with a Walmart bike, specifically a Next. Cost me literally 70 dollars and was as happy as a clam. First ride was something like 10 miles, everything went good. The ride was on road, never even dawned on me back then to ride off road with it. Every ride after that my non drive side crank arm would fall off. Started getting some ghost shifting for no real reason. After it sat around for a few years, my roommate and now best friend/biking buddy got me into wanting to ride. So I took my bike off road, which was a bad idea. Ghost shifting is horribly frustrating when riding a trail. My crank arm fell off and we were unable to find the nut that holds it on. Ended up using one of the nuts the held the front wheel on. So I literally road home with one nut holding my front wheel on. My back wheel was so out of tru that I had to disconnect my rear brake just so I could peddle.

      That was my last experience on that bike. My room mates brother donated to me a old Rigid Steel Schwinn Single speed, until I started to build my first bike.

      Man that sucks. To be honest I’ve ONLY heard bad things about next. Stiff rear shock, wheels become easily untrued, and just bad quality all around. I’d also have to agree that ghost shifting on the trails is definitely something that you don’t want.

    • #88484

      Started out with a steel GT Talera about 20 years ago. Spent 400 bucks and thought it was too much. Bike lasted for a million miles with some replacement parts. I finally traded up for a Rockhopper with a front shock. Within a year I moved up again to a FS HiFi. I just built my new Niner WFO for just over $4000 this year!! So, my experience is that as your skills improve you realize the bike has to improve also.
      People who buy WalMart Bikes have WalMart skills. I don’t EVER snob at someone who is TRYING. I’ll stop say Hi and talk up the sport. Maybe that’s all they can afford. I’m blessed every time I bomb down the mountain on this rig. I always offer to let people try it out too. That’s right, hand over the Walmart special, I’ll spin it for a while. It reminds me that I’ve come a long, long way from jumping that GT off curbs in college.
      As for "snobs" I’ve never met one on the trail.

    • #88485

      +1 Slow. Right on man

    • #88486

      First Mtn bike I owned was a Murray from either Wally or some other discount store. Like others, first ride or two were great! Thought I was rolling on a fine steed. Soon my crank bearings were constantly going to crap. I think my parents brought it back 4 or 5 times and finally told them to keep it.
      Then my parents worked out a deal with me to go halves on a GT All Terra Tequesta. Stuck with GT bikes for almost 10 years till they went, well, whatever they did for a while there! Now, almost 10 years after all that, picked up a closeout Trek and am loving it! I beat this thing with my 300 lbs. frame and it does not disappoint! Walmart is for soap and undies!

    • #88487
      When I was a young mountain biking padawan, I asked my master this very same question about what was really so wrong with Walmart mountain bikes. And he gave me essentially the same answer that I am giving you. Since that time, I have found this to be true through my own personal experience.

      Continue reading…

    • #88488
      "ChiliPepper" wrote

      [quote="Slow":1tntfr20]Started out with a steel GT Talera about 20 years ago. Spent 400 bucks and thought it was too much. Bike lasted for a million miles with some replacement parts. I finally traded up for a Rockhopper with a front shock. Within a year I moved up again to a FS HiFi. I just built my new Niner WFO for just over $4000 this year!! So, my experience is that as your skills improve you realize the bike has to improve also.
      People who buy WalMart Bikes have WalMart skills. I don’t EVER snob at someone who is TRYING. I’ll stop say Hi and talk up the sport. Maybe that’s all they can afford. I’m blessed every time I bomb down the mountain on this rig. I always offer to let people try it out too. That’s right, hand over the Walmart special, I’ll spin it for a while. It reminds me that I’ve come a long, long way from jumping that GT off curbs in college.
      As for "snobs" I’ve never met one on the trail.

      Brother, very well put by far! I am 100% on the same page with you. I do agree with what Goo is getting at, and he makes a great point. The thing is, not all people can afford a $500 bike, especially in this day and time. Times are very hard for most, but of course not for all. So the ones that are having a very bad time can only afford these lower priced bikes. Yes, we all know they were not designed for major off-road use. Some abuse and use it until it breaks, some go way beyond that bikes limitations (also with higher class bikes), and some just want a in-expensive ride for just getting around and for some minute exercise. I have seen a lot of the lower end bikes from the LBS have the same components I have seen on Wally World bikes.

      BTW, I have run across quite a few bike snobs in my time of riding, and I do not mean to offend anyone, but it is the honest truth. Individuals or groups like that are a major turn-off and are very annoying to be around. In the long run, their is many "non-snob" riders out there and I am blessed to be around quite a few of these "non-snobs". In the long run, I wish everyone happy trails and remember that riding is about fun and good health, not what you ride.[/quote:1tntfr20]

      😎 Totally agree with you Chili! The bike doesn’t make the rider. And most of us are just trying to get by nowadays, and biking tends to take the backseat in the budget. There are SO many things that basically NEED to get fixed on my ride, but I can’t afford to do it. But that’s life, and it pedals, so I’m good to go for now!

    • #88489

      JDH

      I bought my 10 yr old daughter a Mongoose XR-75 for $125 from Wally World a couple years ago, it lasted 8 days. The first time she went off a a curb she bent both rims. I straitened them but less then a day later they were untrue again and rubbing on the brake pads. Got my money back and on the way home spotted an older Trek Mountain Track (1997 model I think) at a garage sale for $50 and it lasted till she out grew it, in fact it’s still in the garage waiting on my 7 year old to grow into it.

      That was the first time and last time I bought a bike from WalMart.

    • #88490
      "JDH" wrote

      I bought my 10 yr old daughter a Mongoose XR-75 for $125 from Wally World a couple years ago, it lasted 8 days. The first time she went off a a curb she bent both rims. I straitened them but less then a day later they were untrue again and rubbing on the brake pads. Got my money back and on the way home spotted an older Trek Mountain Track (1997 model I think) at a garage sale for $50 and it lasted till she out grew it, in fact it’s still in the garage waiting on my 7 year old to grow into it.

      That was the first time and last time I bought a bike from WalMart.

      Wow, that’s crazy, but so cool! And at least you got your money back from Walmart… that’s pretty sweet.

      In the end, it was a success! 😀

    • #88491

      "What should I do if I can’t shop at Walmart?"

      If you are looking to get into the sport of mountain biking, the first thing I suggest that you do is not even consider a massive department store chain like Walmart and Target for all of the reasons listed above (here and here). I would recommend looking into getting a decent hardtail mountain bike. (A hardtail is defined as a mountain bike that has front suspension only. Thus, the "hard-tail.") To begin with, I would recommend looking for one of these 4 brands: Giant, Trek, Gary Fisher, or Specialized. These are some of the biggest brand names in mountain biking, and the last 3 could be some of the most expensive. These are not the only brands out there, there are many, many more including Airborne, Cannondale, Jamis, Yeti, Ibis, Novara, Scott, GT, Marin, Pivot, Salsa, Tomac, and many more.

      Continue Reading…

    • #88492

      Hey sorry, I fell off the grid for a few days due to a broken down jeep-
      There has been some nice input here and great stories!

      10 years ago I ended up with a FS Pacific (not sure if that’s Wallmart or not) as partial payment for fixing a lady’s van. I rode it for a couple days and then stopped into a small bike shop and asked a couple questions- The guy there didn’t baffle me with a bunch of technical points all he said was ‘hey, you cant build a decent FS bike for under $200- what kind of quality do you think the individual parts are?’ and he left it at that. That was the beginning of educating myself on bike components and my initial spark of a desire to get back into bikes. – and here we are today.

      I’ll catch up here in a day or so but nice stuff so far!

    • #88493
      "AK_Dan" wrote

      Hey sorry, I fell off the grid for a few days due to a broken down jeep-
      There has been some nice input here and great stories!

      10 years ago I ended up with a FS Pacific (not sure if that’s Wallmart or not) as partial payment for fixing a lady’s van. I rode it for a couple days and then stopped into a small bike shop and asked a couple questions- The guy there didn’t baffle me with a bunch of technical points all he said was ‘hey, you cant build a decent FS bike for under $200- what kind of quality do you think the individual parts are?’ and he left it at that. That was the beginning of educating myself on bike components and my initial spark of a desire to get back into bikes. – and here we are today.

      I’ll catch up here in a day or so but nice stuff so far!

      Dang, I hate car issues! I need a new radiator in my car and I do NOT want to pay for one. I think I may have become a bike commuter over night.

    • #88494
      Mongoose is a confusing case study. While you may find a Mongoose at your local Walmart for less than $300, you may find a Mongoose at your Local Bike Shop for $3,000. What gives?

      Continue reading…

      [url=http://www.gregridestrails.com/2010/04/note-about-mongoose.html]Image

      Image[/url]

    • #88495
      "Goo" wrote
      Mongoose is a confusing case study. While you may find a Mongoose at your local Walmart for less than $300, you may find a Mongoose at your Local Bike Shop for $3,000. What gives?

      From a marketing standpoint that really doesn’t make a lot of sense. Yea you can sell a lot of bikes through the department stores, but what does that do for your brand image? A newbie has to figure out if they are buying a good Mongoose or a bad Mongoose. Heck, its already confusing enough to start out with. John Deere has kind of done the same thing with their lawnmowers. I think its a bad business strategy to cheapen your image and have two completely different qualities sold under the same name.
      I bought a Huffy at K-Mart back around 1990. That bike lasted through 10 years or so of rails to trails with just moderate maintenance. Just took it to Goodwill recently, so its probably still out there somewhere. That bike probably cost $100 in 1990, a fairly low end bike at the time. The low end bike quality must have really gone down since then with bikes that sell at less than $100 now.

    • #88496

      I can relate to creekrider with the whole huffy thing, my first bike was a huffy back in ’89 – ’90 which was bought by my parents and that bike lasted me atleast 5 years till it got jacked. After that I purchased 2 bikes
      on my owm a GT and a Redline BMX which was in ’96-’97 era and i rode those till the wheels fell off. When I got into mtbing I really didnt know squat about the mtbs, First one was a Giant no suspension 10 speed which was also stolen, then I bought a 18speed Roadmaster which was heavier than my spare tire 😏, which i bought from craigslist for 45$ and rode that on the trails and didnt care what anybody thought cus all I wanted to do was ride and even as i got more educated with mtbs and components and diffrent little details I still rode my Roadmaster. I used that bike to not only get good at climbing with a heavy bike but to progress in some technical areas. I literally rode the bike till it broke because when i put it up last year I didnt realize the crank was bent, rear tire had become untrue and other things that just werent worth fixing so off to the LBS I was and now Im back in a GT avy with disc brakes. Not one of the elite models but to me GT is an elite brand but like i said i just want to ride and eventually move up to building my own rig. Thanks to Goo for bringing this up beacuse its important to know more than just how to ride a bike, you need to have it sized specificly to fit you, meaning bike frame, seat height and handle bar length and height. At the end of the day education is key to enjoying your bike on (or off) the trails…. [RIde hard or Stay Home][/quote]

    • #88497
      In the end, mountain biking is about getting out and having fun on your bike. Sometimes people get too hung up on what bike they’re riding, what component isn’t as nice as they’d like it to be, or what isn’t working right on their rig. This general guide has been written to explain and give examples of why Walmart bicycles are not a good choice as an entry level bike.

      [url=http://www.gregridestrails.com/2010/04/just-ride-what-you-want-to-ride.html]CONTINUE READING…

      Image[/url]

    • #88498

      Hello, first post here…Honestly I was going to buy a Walmart Mongoose just to save some dough, but I picked out a Cannondale instead. I’m a newbie in the sense that I’ve been out of it for 15 years. In the 90s, I had Cannondales, Treks, etc – but married now which makes me a poor man. Your blog helped my wife understand why buying the expensive-to-her Cannondale F8 for $420 is not ridiculous…thanks mate!

      Cheers,
      Reiver
      Round Rock, TX and looking for trails

    • #88499
      "reiver" wrote

      Hello, first post here…Honestly I was going to buy a Walmart Mongoose just to save some dough, but I picked out a Cannondale instead. I’m a newbie in the sense that I’ve been out of it for 15 years. In the 90s, I had Cannondales, Treks, etc – but married now which makes me a poor man. Your blog helped my wife understand why buying the expensive-to-her Cannondale F8 for $420 is not ridiculous…thanks mate!

      Cheers,
      Reiver
      Round Rock, TX and looking for trails

      Thats awesome 😃 I’m glad I could be of assistance!

    • #88500
      "Goo" wrote

      [quote="reiver":1w7bidem]Hello, first post here…Honestly I was going to buy a Walmart Mongoose just to save some dough, but I picked out a Cannondale instead. I’m a newbie in the sense that I’ve been out of it for 15 years. In the 90s, I had Cannondales, Treks, etc – but married now which makes me a poor man. Your blog helped my wife understand why buying the expensive-to-her Cannondale F8 for $420 is not ridiculous…thanks mate!

      Cheers,
      Reiver
      Round Rock, TX and looking for trails

      Thats awesome 😃 I’m glad I could be of assistance![/quote:1w7bidem]

      I ditched the Cannondale and bought a more expensive GIANT Rincon…which had a lot beefier fork (not the best, but didn’t want to jump to ($700 on sale) a RockShox equipped Haro))…well I did, but I didn’t want the wife to kill me in my sleep. The bike had better components as well as it shifted a lot smoother. On another note – I just found out I’m not 20 anymore after a test sprint. Forgot to buy a new helmet and decided to go for it anyways…came close to regretting that. 😮

    • #88501

      P.S. Always wash out your new Camelbak or you will have powdery water when you are dying of thirst….mistakes happen when daylight is burning 😕

    • #88502

      Nice blog posts, Greg. I started MTBing a few years ago and would’ve found that kind of advice really valuable.

      Based on what I read in magazines (MBA, MB Mag, DirtRag), much of the new bike advice is directed at people who already know what they want performance wise.

    • #88503
      "soezgg" wrote

      Nice blog posts, Greg. I started MTBing a few years ago and would’ve found that kind of advice really valuable.

      Based on what I read in magazines (MBA, MB Mag, DirtRag), much of the new bike advice is directed at people who already know what they want performance wise.

      Thanks for the kind words man! Yeah, I was really aiming at the absolute beginner, someone who doesn’t own a bike and has no idea. I’ve got some stuff in the works for general bike shopping guidelines for the more experienced rider.

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