Bikers with "bling"

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This topic contains 26 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  =ChrisB= 13 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #69518

    Is it just me, or are mountain bikes becoming the new transportation of choice for young city kids wanting to look cool? They’re the full suspension, low-grade models you’d get at Wal-Mart or Target for $180.

    I support all who want to ride, but I frankly think it’s turning into bad PR. In Boston, these kids go flying through the streets and sidewalks on them, no helmets, almost taking out pedestrians all over the place.

    It’s hard enough trying to maintain good relations with the trails from jerks who tear the places up with little to no respect for the environment, but now we can possibly end up with people in the city, who don’t even know where the nearest trail is, speaking out against mountain bikes…

    Sorry, I had to vent. 😼

  • #69519

    The sad thing is, a lot of those kids could become responsible MTB’ers, if they had a little guidance…..

    But they buy what they know…. and that’s the $99-Special at Wally-world…. And lets face it, the average MTB helmet isn’t exactly a fashion statement either…. So any kid with the slightest bit of self-insecurity isn’t going to wear a helmet, just because they might get laughed at….
    Plus, a lot of the old pro-BMX’ers never wore helmets, so there’s that lingering image to live with as well…..

    I’ve run into a few guys here in the Army riding about on PX bikes…..
    Mongooses, Nexts, & Diamondback full-suspension rigs…..
    All while wearing ridiculous styrofoam cruiseships that somehow pass as helmets.
    On a whole, they’re riding about because their car is broken, or their wife took their truck, or they have a medical no-running profile…. and the look on their faces translates as “THIS SUCKS!”.

    A couple of them I’ve stopped while riding to/from work, and quizzed ’em about how much they ride, and if they like it. I try to get my enthusiasm infectious enough so that they’ll ask me the crucial question…..

    “How much did you pay for your bike?”

    Now, if I told ’em right off the bat: “Oh, only $5000.”, the next response I’d get from such an individual would be laughter.
    Instead, I hop off my Nomad and ask ’em if they wanna take it for a spin.
    Almost %100 of the time, after pedaling about for a few minutes, they give the bike back to me with praises on how light it is (and my SantaCruz weighs in at over 32lbs!), how easily it shifts, and how good the suspension feels.

    So far, I’ve gotten a couple rather naive guys on some halfway decent hardtails, and it’s opened a whole new world to them. Biking around the corner to the store doesn’t become such a chore anymore, and when they discover the glorious singletrack, it sinks the hook even deeper.

  • #69520

    I was hanging out in Breckenridge yesterday and noticed a group of kids cruising around the streets there — I don’t think any of their bikes cost less than a $1000. So I guess it just depends on your social strata. 😕

  • #69521

    It does depend most definitely, on social strata…..

    I’ve seen some 13yr olds on the trails riding $7k downhill & freeride bikes with custom TLD body-armor……

    I know they didn’t save up the money for those by mowing lawns, and I betcha that their parents have at least one extra key-fob that says “Jaguar”, “BMW”, or “Lexus”.

  • #69522

    Most of the blame would have to be on the parents side. They don’t spend time with their own kids and to get them out of their hair they buy them what ever they want. When I was growing up in the late 70’s and 80’s it was about BMX bikes now it’s MTN. bikes. I had to work to get my bike where a lot of kids got them because their parents just gave them what they wanted because they were brats and it would get them out of their hair during the summer. If parents would spend a little time with their kids when they are growing up and would teach them about having respect for others, mother nature, and life their kids might grow up with smarts. I know it’s not always about bad parenting but 90% of the time it is. As far as the cheap bikes that are out there it’s fine. Not all of us can afford nice bikes and it’s great manufactors are making cheap bikes but people need to understand you get what you pay for. If my parents would of had money when I was a kid I might of had a GT, Redline, or a Haro but I rode a Huffy prothunder. Most kids that live in Breck have parents with money so they get to ride nicer stuff and this isn’t just in Breck though it’s every where. One thing I use to do was hand out these little cards I got from a park ranger one time that had trail tips and rules on one side and talked about having respect for others and wildlife on the other side and I would hand them out to people I saw on the trail that didn’t know how to yield to other people. It’s been a while since I’ve seen this card but I have seen some other cards out there that told about trail tips and rules. I think I’ll have to make some on my computer and start handing them out again 😆 Alright I think I blabed enough! Remember to have fun and have respect—life will be much happier 😃

  • #69523

    Back to the original thought-yes, it is a shame that people ride around big cities on bikes they have no idea how to handle, and jump off curbs and scare old ladies and cause cars to swerve and basically create a nuisance. But at least they’re not inside playing grand theft auto ALL day long. The curse of athleticism…we want the younger generations to get off the couch, but when they do, we quickly realize there’s no guidance as to what they WILL do with what they’re given. I guess we just need to shrug it off, and head into the woods for some sweet single track and let all thoughts of stereotypes fly away.

    😎

  • #69524

    Very true…..

    Unfortunately, some of them seem to have found their way onto our trails lately, and lost none of their blatant disregard for trail manners or trail preservation.

  • #69525

    Look, I grew up in an affluent neighborhood in Virginia. My Huffy Prothunder IV days were during the late 70’s and early 80’s. I had a few cool mongoose upgrades (when mongoose was still cool) and “snake belly” tires. Always wanted a Hutch though… Anyway, we had no trails to my knowledge and we certainly had no mountain bikes. What we had was a whole lot of energy, great parenting, and a solid education. I distinctly remember doing a lot of dumb stuff on my bikes with a lot of average suburbanite kids. I don’t think my parents had anything to do with it either. Unless you want to blame them for putting a bike under the seat of a typical kid. Hmmmm, there was the time we placed a ramp at the top of an already steep drop just so we could get even bigger airs, the time we all lay on the ground while buddies jumped over us like “Evil” jumped over cars and trucks, or when we jumped our bikes into the local lake. We could have broken our necks soooooo many times and some did somewhere, I am sure. I guess what I am trying to say is, remember your youth. Don’t be so critical and judgemental of today’s youth. If you are still riding your bikes, yer still one of ’em!!! It’s all relative anyway. My co-workers at the office think I am nuts for “playing in traffic” or “tearing up the trails”. When I see kids jumping off sidewalks and flying down parking decks, I think to myself…good for them. Maybe we’re all a little envious (maybe not of the bikes) because they can do what we are afraid to do. They ride uninhibited, it’s pure, it’s honest and they don’t care what anyone thinks. I admire them. I wish I had the nerve to show up at my next mountain bike race on a NEXT. The truth is, I’d be embarassed and I know some of you out there would rather stay at home than be seen on such a low-grade ride. We could take a few clues from these kids and loosen up a bit…just ride,don’t critique it. We are turning the sport into Golf for crying out loud!

  • #69526

    Well, I’m not being critical of today’s youth….

    What really gets me is seeing a kid struggling on a $5000 DH or freeride bike that is obviously beyond his means & ability.
    There’s only two ways a young teenager could afford to get one of those bikes…. Working for it, or begging for it. Somehow, I doubt the average 14yr old has the patience to save up $5k working lawns & carrying groceries.

    So it’s not really the kid I’m irritated by…. It’s the parents.

    When I was growing up, I had an old Huffy that looked sorta like a dirtbike. That thing took a lot of pounding and abuse before it disappeared.
    Then I went through a series of thrift-shop cruisers & road-bikes, each of which never cost more than $50, and never lasted longer than a month.
    Finally, the last bike I really rode before giving up altogether, was my Dad’s old early 70’s Schwinn road-bike.
    I rode the piss out of that thing, putting an average of 20 miles a day on it. I even took it on the singletrack that followed the river to my girlfriend’s house, and I never wanted for any other bike.
    Finally, I crashed it doing about 40mph after a brake cable cut loose during a hard curve…..
    And my Dad wouldn’t help pay for a new bike. By then, I figured I could spend my savings on a car, and have it pay off for me by allowing for more distant job sites.

    My parents never gave me more than $20 a week…. I’d get maybe a $100 for Christmas, and $50 for birthdays.
    And I’ve never known ANY of my friends over the years to get more than that while growing up.

    So now, I see a LOT of kids wandering around with $300 cellphones, $1k digital cameras, Ipods, buying games for their Xbox360s, driving 2007 cars/trucks, & riding +$5k bikes….. and it really makes me wonder.

  • #69527

    Sounds like somebody is a little jealous. Who cares if some kids parents buys them a $5k bike, or brand new car, or $300 cell phone. I never had that stuff when I was growing up either. I don’t have a cell phone to this day, and I definately had to work for my own car. However, the 13year old on a $5k bike passing me on my $1300 bike isn’t hurting me. Unless he kicks me on the way by. At which time I might have to beat his a#$. So, cut the kids some slack, and cut their parents some slack. God for bid a parent want their kid to have some cool stuff while they are growing up. Trust me, when my daughters are ready to ride, I am going to get them the best bike I can afford. If it happens to be a $5k bike, than so be it.

  • #69528

    Amen to the above post…who cares. We should be worried about raising good kids, NICE kids. What they posses materially does not make them irresponsible or mean neccessarily. I hope that my kids possess the passion to get out and ride…if they show a lot of enthusiasm and tenancity, hopefully they will be one of those kids on the $5k bikes ( if we can afford it 😉 ) Shouldn’t we give them our best, if they are willing to give their best! Lead by example, don’t worry what other’s think!

    Like Lance says, “it’s not about the bike”

  • #69529

    Yeah, I am a little jealous….. There was a sweet ’71 Cutlass for sale near my house when I was 16….. and it was ONLY $4000. 😏

    Anyways…… %100 of the kids (under 16) that I’ve ran into on the trails with full-on DH, freeride, or dirtjump bikes are just plain BRATS.

    Example #1 (and not the only):
    I got wrapped up up in one kid’s wheels while I was heading uphill, as he was bombing down a singletrack on a Specy Demo9.
    There was more than enough room for him to slow down and give me time to move, I would’ve gladly yielded the trail…. I’m a pretty firm believer in giving riders on the downslope the right-of-way.
    But he didn’t slow down, yelled a couple choice profanities, and then had the gall to accuse me of causing his wreck, & damaging his bike. This particular punk couldn’t have been more than 14.

    I’ve also been threatened (both verbally & physically) by local dirt-jumpers who love to accuse XC mtb’ers with trail-poaching. They kinda just move in and declare a section of trail as their turf, while building illegal ramps and digging out jumps.

    Buying a $5k bike for a kid when they’re still larvae is fine, as long as the parental units accompany the youngling on their trail adventures, instead of just turning them loose.

    Ah hell, maybe I’m just getting to be a bitter old man…. 😈 😉

  • #69530
    "jhewitt" wrote

    We should be worried about raising good kids, NICE kids. What they posses materially does not make them irresponsible or mean neccessarily. “

    To clarify the original post of this thread, the above statement is the catharsis behind my rant. The kids I’m speaking of are on bikes as a status symbol. They’re wearing basketball jerseys and baggy jeans, and they have no intention of riding on trails. They do ride through red lights and almost knock over Mrs. Oldlady while they tear down sidewalks.

    They do so on mountain bikes and use the bike’s ability to essentially just give mountain bikes a bad name when most of us work so very hard to give this awesome sport a good one.

  • #69531
    I had a few cool mongoose upgrades (when mongoose was still cool) and “snake belly” tires.

    This is off the topic, but I would argue Mongoose has regained its coolness. Mongoose has been developing some good rides lately and have been keeping them affordable (probably due to size of Pacific compared to small bike mfgs). I was planning on buying a Specialized Stumpjumper something for almost 3K. I was able to pick up an ’05 Mongoose Teocali Super with similar components, etc for 1.3K. She’s not the prettiest, but pedals very well, is plush, and still going strong after 1200 miles. I claim it to be a steal.

    As for the reckless kids, they get on my nerves but I haven’t decided yet if that was me growing up too and I’ve changed, or they really are worse. Keep pedaling! 😃

  • #69532

    Ok I think I was the one who said something about parents. Here’s the deal, I know it’s not always the parents fault but in most cases it is. When I grew up I was taught right from wrong and ya I did a lot of things that are considered bad when I was young like jumping off stairs and poaching the city parks at night when their closed so you can find some awesome obsticals to have fun on and many more bad things that I will not get into, yes I knew what I was doing was bad but that’s not I was talking about. I was responding to how these kids were riding on sidewalks and running into PEOPLE, when I did all my fun but bad things I made sure not to hit anyone well unless it was my friends of course, 😆 but my whole point is that kids and everyone should have respect for others and I feel that respect should be something that parents should teach there kids at an early age, also I don’t really care what bikes kids are riding but if you pay attention to the kids that are riding nice bikes you’ll start seeing which one’s have respect and which one’s don’t and the one’s that don’t have any are the one’s the parents went out and bought them a nice bike just so they don’t have to deal with their kids, trust me I’ve been working in the retail business for most of my working career and I see it everyday. So I don’t care if kids go out and do bad things or things they shouldn’t do fund but bad things because it might hurt them but they should make sure they check around them before jumping off a set of stairs and landing on other people (unless it’s their friends 😆 ) and putting them in harms way. Oh ya it’s not just kids too, there’s a bunch of adults 18 and up that still need to be taught some respect too 😃 . SO ALL I’M SAYING IS THAT WE ALL SHOULD HAVE A LITTLE RESPECT!!! 😃 Alright let’s put this behind us and lets all go out and have a great next ride!!!! 😃 😃

  • #69533
    "dauw" wrote
    This is off the topic, but I would argue Mongoose has regained its coolness. Mongoose has been developing some good rides lately and have been keeping them affordable (probably due to size of Pacific compared to small bike mfgs).

    I’ll agree with that…. 😎

    I was really chilly with the idea of Mongoose’s entry into the high-end MTB market…. And their Teocali & BlackDiamond bikes sorta looked like an mash-up of a jungle-gym & a mountain-bike….

    But then I had the opportunity to look at some of those bikes up close recently, and I was really impressed by the welds, components, and price.
    I’ve definitely seen worse, and for more money at the same time (Giant comes to mind)…….

  • #69534

    Yea I agree that alot of young people today are jerks (or brats, whatever you like) and it is pretty depressing. But your generalizing. If all some 14 or whatever year old can afford is the $300 deal at the wall but there respectful riders who fallow trail laws, thats cool by me! However, alot of other stuff you guys said is true. Stupid realestate brokers! Damn those demo 9s! give me my Wahoo any day! or soon i guess it’d be my Prophet 400 that [i:2yfqzedf]I am buying on my own[/i:2yfqzedf]. lol.

  • #69535

    Im a kid but I actualy mountain bike. My parents bought me a motobecane and take me to the trails every now and then.

  • #69536

    what model is it? they look… ok.

  • #69537

    Greetings from the Wasatch range. I’ve read this post and I think that everyone experiences bike envy at one time or another, and yes seeing a 14 year old on a 5000 Dh rig does really hit home especially after you saved as much as you could for as long as you could to afford your ride. The real problem in my mind is not the riders or parents monetary standing in society but the ability of the rider on the bike, it’s too easy to get amped up and get in too deep that is where the problem lies, believing that the bike will allow you to do more than you can handle. This is where the problem really gets going when a young riders parents rush to the hospital, asking what happened to their, son or daughter. Now the parents won’t blame themselves because they bought the best bike possible with all the bells and whistles, but the manufacturer, bike shop employee, the film maker, or the trail crew that built the trail must be responsible because that is the way our society works. The person most directly involved, the parents, must pass the buck to someone else, anyone with money. What a great way to introduce myself to the forum, sorry about being so long winded, probably beacuse I broke my 5000 bike to day that my mommy bought me…

  • #69538

    Speaking of ability…..

    We went to Keystone yesterday, and I blew by three guys with full-on Giant & Specialized DH rigs….
    They were clattering down an intermediate trail like old wimmin….. 😆

    Then again, maybe I’m just crazy, and was going far too fast. 😼

  • #69539
    "Bombardier" wrote

    Then again, maybe I’m just crazy, and was going far too fast. 😼

    That sounds vaguely familiar… mwahahaha! 😼

    I think this post got completely off topic. Anyone take a ditch lately? Let’s revisit that post – always makes me laugh. 😆 😆

  • #69540

    I think it’s funny that so much thought should go into whether or not a 14yr old deserves a 5k bike. I have to say that:
    As a mother my opinion stands firm “If you didn’t earn it then you don’t deserve it”
    As a cyclists the responses sound like their based on each person’s desire, as a rider, to have an excellent bike and by denying another that which we desire ourselves seems to be unfair. But let’s face it, a 14 yr old with a 5k bike is an absurdity. If not then answer these questions:
    Why does a 14 yr old deserve a 5k bike?
    If he/she didn’t have to work, save, endure crappy or mediocre bikes what gain is there from having this excellent machine?

  • #69541

    Well said! I say, if you can ride it and if you can ern it……. BUY THE DAMN THING!

  • #69542

    Okay – I get the spoiled kid thing, and I get the giving kids too much too soon thing. I strongly believe that spoiled irresponsible kids turn into spoiled self-centered adults. BUT I know that my boy would appear spoiled to someone who might not know him, and he’s anything but!

    My guy and my boy put together a really nice bike (built it from the frame up) and it was a killer experience. We ride about 4 times a week. My boy also snowboards a lot. (once a week thoughout the season) However the kids has a ton of responsibility and is homeschooled so he doesn’t get a lot of stuff.

    I’m amazed at all the crap his friends have (talk about spoiled), the best in sports equipt, the newest in video and computer equipt. But they think he’s got life made because of his bike, his school sched, his snowboarding…

    I guess I’m of the mind “don’t judge a book…” but also leary of the parenting train of thought “throw enough money at them and they’ll love you”

    Just my $0.02.

  • #69543

    Fitch, In “original” response to you…. it happens everywhere. There’s always “those” kids or nuts riders. I dont think its bad PR… at least they’re not at home zoning out on on coke n chips while blastin’ guts all over the place on the latest PS2 game.

    As for the cheapy FS’s, its better than nothing. I dont often pay attention to the bike as much as the rider. I see killers riders all the time with $100 bikes, and am happy to ride with them regardless. I spent about $1500 three years ago, and have a rig that Im happy with cause it does what I want to do. I do know that cheapy FS’s suck cause of the weight and lack or rebound adjustability, but the kids will never appreciate the technology unless they start with cheapy’s, and eventually make their way up to the right kind of bike for their individual skill. Boo to the parents spoiling their kids with the latest n greatest.

  • #69544
    "beckijhn" wrote

    Okay – I get the spoiled kid thing, and I get the giving kids too much too soon thing. I strongly believe that spoiled irresponsible kids turn into spoiled self-centered adults. BUT I know that my boy would appear spoiled to someone who might not know him, and he’s anything but!

    My guy and my boy put together a really nice bike (built it from the frame up) and it was a killer experience. We ride about 4 times a week. My boy also snowboards a lot. (once a week thoughout the season) However the kids has a ton of responsibility and is homeschooled so he doesn’t get a lot of stuff.

    I’m amazed at all the crap his friends have (talk about spoiled), the best in sports equipt, the newest in video and computer equipt. But they think he’s got life made because of his bike, his school sched, his snowboarding…

    I guess I’m of the mind “don’t judge a book…” but also leary of the parenting train of thought “throw enough money at them and they’ll love you”

    Just my $0.02.

    Sounds like me 😃 😃

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