basic skills needed

Forums Mountain Bike Forum basic skills needed

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    • #109847

      I’d like to get to where I can hold a track stand a little, and also get my bunnie hop going just a little. Basic things like that.
      So does anyone have any advice and tips to get the track stand going or do I just go work it till I’m sick of falling? 😀

    • #109848

      A good way to learn the track stand is on a uphill

    • #109849
      "ollysj" wrote

      A good way to learn the track stand is on a uphill

      ^^This. A slight uphill is all you need. It allows you to rock back and forth a bit to find your balance.

      As for bunny hopping, I suggest using flats and a hardtail. Work on rear wheel lifts by pressing down with your legs then sucking them up to allow the bike to rise. With a hard tail you don’t need to time it right with the suspension coming back up although it might be easier to "bounce it" with full-suspension once you get the general motion down.

      Then, once you get the rear wheel motion down, add lifting the front before you lift the rear.

      Picking up Mastering Mountain Bike Skills wouldn’t hurt either.

    • #109850

      I second mastering mountain bike skills. It is a great book that can provide some real answers and ideas to help you get to your goals.

    • #109851

      Any kind souls can advise on manualing?
      I am riding a 19" hardtail, would downsizing to a smaller frame make it easier?
      Is it the skills or the frame size? Now if I were to get a 29er, would that mean I can forget about manualing? I had watched countless Youtube videos & still can’t manual 😳

    • #109852

      I booked a training with 4 of my buddies next sunday, to improve our skills. Guess that will give me more than watching tons of vids.

    • #109853
      "kcrushz" wrote

      Any kind souls can advise on manualing?
      I am riding a 19" hardtail, would downsizing to a smaller frame make it easier?
      Is it the skills or the frame size? Now if I were to get a 29er, would that mean I can forget about manualing? I had watched countless Youtube videos & still can’t manual 😳

      I read shorter chainstays do make it easier to manual so a smaller frame would, in theory, make it easier to lift the front wheel, but it would also make easier to loop out.

      The "pros" can manual 29ers, it just takes more commitment because the move is "bigger."

      I think a 19" hardtail would be a good frame to learn on, provided it’s properly sized. You don’t need to take the rear suspension into account when finding the balance point.

      Watch the videos, then practice, practice, practice. When you’re sick of practicing, practice some more 😃


      @Ollysj

      Enjoy the training; I’m jealous!

    • #109854
      "Jared13" wrote

      @Ollysj
      Enjoy the training; I’m jealous!

      Will do, thx. No need to be jealous. Don’t you have any instructors in your area?

    • #109855
      "ollysj" wrote

      [quote="Jared13":2t6ub21s]@Ollysj
      Enjoy the training; I’m jealous!

      Will do, thx. No need to be jealous. Don’t you have any instructors in your area?[/quote:2t6ub21s]

      We had betterride come through on the 19th of May but my sister was getting married that day and to make sure I went to the wedding, I broke my collarbone a month before the wedding 😆

      I’ll hit up a betterride camp eventually. Maybe not this season but the next season for sure.

    • #109856

      Ouch, hope everything is fine with it again. Well, there is always another oppurtunity. We was talking about a training for like 2 years, but this year we really get it done.

    • #109857
      "ollysj" wrote

      Ouch, hope everything is fine with it again. Well, there is always another oppurtunity. We was talking about a training for like 2 years, but this year we really get it done.

      It’s healing fine, just slowly…well, too slow for my taste, but the docs say it’s right on schedule. I start rehab this coming week (I think) so hopefully I can get back on the bike soon!

    • #109858

      Thanks everyone. I’ve ordered the Mastering mountain bike skills. back to the practice practice practice thing. Surprised my self today when I had to stop suddenly (or hit a tree) kept balanced long enough to spin pedals backward and get the foot out on the side I was starting to lean to. Don’t know how I did it but it felt good. I’m suprised a lot what I can handle when I sack up a little, but I go through the cycle of trying harder things till a fall, followed by a period of shying like a spooky horse at any rock or drop. 😳
      And Jared13 hope your back on the bike soon. 😀

    • #109859
      by Jared13 ยป Sat May 26, 2012 10:13 am
      I read shorter chainstays do make it easier to manual so a smaller frame would, in theory, make it easier to lift the front wheel, but it would also make easier to loop out.

      The "pros" can manual 29ers, it just takes more commitment because the move is "bigger."

      I think a 19" hardtail would be a good frame to learn on, provided it’s properly sized. You don’t need to take the rear suspension into account when finding the balance point.

      Watch the videos, then practice, practice, practice. When you’re sick of practicing, practice some more


      @Ollysj

      Enjoy the training; I’m jealous!

      My bike in high school was full suspension and I could wheelie, manual, and bunny hop all day. I got a hardtail 29er when I graduated college (2 years ago) and am still working on these skills. It is orders of magnitude harder without the suspension in the rear (for me at least). Of course the fact that the new one is an XL frame (I’m 6’4" now) doesn’t help, either

    • #109860

      Smaller frame size won’t have shorter chainstays, not if it’s the same frame anyways. Look at any geometry chart for any bike and you’ll see that the chainstay length is the same for all sizes. It should change, because if you want to keep the weight distribution the same for multiple size frames you should scale up everthing, not just the front. But that’s another discussion. 😃

      As for skills: study up on the proper techniques, then practice, practice, practice.

    • #109861

      The training was a great experience. Learned way more, than I ever could from a book or vid, becuse I got promt feedback from the instructor. It was a lot of fun too

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