Are "racks" fopa on MTB’s??

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    • #76716

      :?: I’ve noticed that in all the photo’s, there’s not one MTB with a rear rack, is it a MTB fashion fopa or something?? Having a backpack on while riding, at least for me is a "sweat fest", ie: a drenched jersey and not really comfortable.

      My current POS DSB MTB, I’ve got a rear rack on with a well fitting "rack bag", I’ve put down a deposit on a 09 Jamis Trail-X 2.0, (sorry it’s best I can afford) but don’t want to look like a Uber-Geek so am I stuck with a sweaty backpack 😳

    • #76717

      cjm

      Racks aren’t popular for a few reasons. Most don’t work on full squish bikes. For most of us who have hardtails, they are just unnecessary weight. The real problem is that as you work into more advanced riding, the rack throws off the balance of the bike.

      If you carry any speed through a technical section, especially with a hardtail, the bike will destabilize a bit. The normally isn’t a problem. Adding weight above the rear wheel can cause the destabilization to become to violent to control.

      Riding many advanced trails requires that you lift the rear wheel of the bike. If you have a rack and stuff attached to that rack, then you’ll have to really excerpt yourself to maneuver that wheel.

      When you really start ripping, you’ll lean the bike into corners and float over rock gardens. A well balanced bike will try to right itself when cornering. A bike with a bunch of weight above the rear wheel, will try to fall over. Excessive weight above the rear wheel will weight load the rear end of the bike, making it really tough to float over gnarly sections.

      Ultimately, the feasibility of using a rack depends on your vision of mountain biking. If see MTB as a beefed up version of a road bike, then a rack will never be a problem. If, like me, you see a mountain bike as a muscle/gravity powered motobike, then ditch the rack. Try a whicking layer to deal with the sweat.

    • #76718

      CJM, thanks for the reply, that’s a tuff question, I know that when I’m riding with my wife, we will be doing mostly rail/trail path riding and maybe some of the beginner singletack. When it’s just ME, I’d like to tackle some of the meaner singletrack but I don’t plan on doing big drops as I’m 50+ and the bones don’t heal fast, LOL! 😉

      I already ride with the "wicking" jersey and undershirt but still soak when wearing a backpack. Maybe I’ll add the rack (yep I ride hardtail’s) but not use the rackpack when it’s just ME riding 💡 Again thanks for the "food for thought", it’s appreciated! 😃

    • #76719

      Just an idea on the backpack sweat issue…it may or may not pertai to your situation.

      Back in my college days I literally rode with a "backpack"; Jansport, the same one I’d head off to class with books in. It wasn’t made for biking and had no sweat zones, mesh pads, or air channels, and was pretty heavy and bulky. I used to have a nice backpack sized sweat stain each time I got done with a trail no matter what I wore as a shirt or jersey. Once I got out of school and got some $$ I invested in a camel back and the majority of the problem went away. They are a bit smaller to start off with and they are designed around bike riding fit and comfort. Most have great air channels built in that direct wind down your back to evaporate away the existing moisture and mesh pads to absorb the rest off your backside.

      Not sure if you are still riding with the old school backpack or not but if so, try a camel back or one of the many look a like brands and I think you will be happy with the results. Just make sure you get one with a large enough water bladder for your rides and plenty of extra storage space for the miscellaneous junk we all carry on our rides. 😀

    • #76720

      Use water bottles instead of a camelbak.

    • #76721
      "Jeremy_Green" wrote

      Just an idea on the backpack sweat issue…it may or may not pertai to your situation.

      Back in my college days I literally rode with a "backpack"; Jansport, the same one I’d head off to class with books in. It wasn’t made for biking and had no sweat zones, mesh pads, or air channels, and was pretty heavy and bulky. I used to have a nice backpack sized sweat stain each time I got done with a trail no matter what I wore as a shirt or jersey. Once I got out of school and got some $$ I invested in a camel back and the majority of the problem went away. They are a bit smaller to start off with and they are designed around bike riding fit and comfort. Most have great air channels built in that direct wind down your back to evaporate away the existing moisture and mesh pads to absorb the rest off your backside.

      Not sure if you are still riding with the old school backpack or not but if so, try a camel back or one of the many look a like brands and I think you will be happy with the results. Just make sure you get one with a large enough water bladder for your rides and plenty of extra storage space for the miscellaneous junk we all carry on our rides. 😀

      Jeremy, thanks, I’m gulity as charged, I was riding with a standard wally-mart backpack not a camelback or genric equiv. 😳 I’ll look into the camelback’s, etc. this weekend, I’ll have to have the larger water holder version as I’m a fat old guy and I NEED a lot of water 😮 Probably have the bladder and at least one bottle on the bike too! Again, thanks for the tip, it’s very appreciated!! 😃

    • #76722
      "seenvic" wrote

      Use water bottles instead of a camelbak.

      I already use a large water bottle on my current POS DSB MTB, the back pack was for "lock and cable", extra clothes, gloves, snack, tool roll (when you ride a DSB, you need more tools=heavy), etc. I like to be prepared as much as possible, when I ride cause, to be very honest, since I’m riding a DSB, I’m riding by myself! 😢

      When I was carrying all that in a "wally-mart" backpack, it really seems HEAVY and put a hurt on my shoulders, now that I’ve got a rear rack/rackbag combo I don’t even notice the extra weight so there is a plus to a "rack" over the "back pack". It may be that I just haven’t been able to get into "narly enough singletrack" to where I could feel the "destablization" of the rear end by the rack and gear weight :?:

      The other thing is that my BIKE has to "do it all", I can’t afford to have "just a bike for off-road", the budget (if that’s what you call it), limits me to "One Bike". Although after I get the new Jamis, I think I will look for a "old Ridged" MTB to turn into a commuter! 😎 The main problem is trying to stuff 3 bikes (2-mine/1-Mrs.) into an effecency apt.!! 😮

    • #76723

      I dont like to wear a pack on all my rides either, here is a system Ive developed over the years that works ok. My water bottle and an air pump are mounted to the frame, a small tool bag that hangs under the seat contains a multi tool, a tightly rolled extra tube and a couple lightweight tire levers- there, basics covered.
      Whatever else I need for these rides, cell phone, wallet, etc. either goes in the pockets of my shorts or I use a belt pack, yea, they used to be refered to as a ‘fanny pack’ back in the ol days. but they will keep the sweat off your back so to speak.

    • #76724

      The only stupid piece of equipment is the piece you do not use. Do not worry about trail fashion, leave the fashion concerns to the road wienies and the converted road wienies and use whatever works for you. Do not follow trends, do not ride what the magazines tell you to ride, go with what you have. There was a saying, back in the day, that used to cover situations like this, and it goes; "John Tomac can beat you on a Huffy". Translation – It’s the rider, more than the bike (similar – It’s not the weapon, but rather than the soldier that wields it). Rule number two is; Have freaking fun. Later…

      "Attack life. It’s going to kill you anyway"
    • #76725

      My old bike I had a rack on it. Used it in college a lot. Alos used it to carry a small cooler when I rode to work. I never removed it when I stopped carrying stuff like that. Was a good way to keep the mud off of me.

      It will stay on it when I finally convert it to a single speed.

    • #76726

      I used a rack during my first year of riding and had no real complaints. I had a pack that I strapped onto the rack. Back then, I thought you needed to carry everything you could possibly need with you when you ride. Rode heavy and slow. OK for rails to trails and other flat stuff though.

      Now I ride more vertical stuff and I look at the weight factor of all items I carry and use a camelback. I still use my rack for chainsaw work on trails since I don’t have a trailer for my gear. It definitely throws off my balance with all that weight on the rear and I have to shift my weight more carefully.

    • #76727

      The solution I use, living in HOT Arizona is a Deuter backpack. It has a air mesh (Air Comfort Back system) back that lets your back breathe much better than a Camelbak or anything else, keeping you drier. VauDe also makes mesh panel packs but are not as popular in the US anymore. I suggest about a 16 liter pack for serious riding, like the Race X Air or larger if you wanna carry a picnic or store layers of clothes.
      Bladder is great design. About $80.

    • #76728

      Who says you can’t "swing both ways?"

      I use the Topeak MTX Beam Rack (E version.) On low and slow days – mellow trails, or out with the family, clip it on the seatpost, load up and ride. If the ride might be more intense where the rack might be a hindrance, it only takes a few seconds to hit the quick release and pull it. Nothings permanent.

      They’ve got 3 versions of the frame – A,E,V which are just differences in the angles of the main beam to suit your seat post angle and suspension travel. The E clears the travel I have on my Rush 6.

      Add the side rails and a bag, and you’re set.

      http://www.topeak.com/products/Racks

    • #76729
      "vincimus" wrote

      The only stupid piece of equipment is the piece you do not use. Do not worry about trail fashion, leave the fashion concerns to the road wienies and the converted road wienies and use whatever works for you. Do not follow trends, do not ride what the magazines tell you to ride, go with what you have. There was a saying, back in the day, that used to cover situations like this, and it goes; "John Tomac can beat you on a Huffy". Translation – It’s the rider, more than the bike (similar – It’s not the weapon, but rather than the soldier that wields it). Rule number two is; Have freaking fun. Later…

      "Attack life. It’s going to kill you anyway"

      Thumbs up!

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