What MTB mistakes have you learned from?

Forums Mountain Bike Forum What MTB mistakes have you learned from?

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of mikehart57 mikehart57 2 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #215462

    I’d love to soak up some of the collective wisdom here. 🙂

    What’s a mountain bike mistake you’ve made that taught ended up teaching you a valuable lesson?

  • #215508

    I use to wash my bike like a car. I figured that if i can ride through creeks and mud my water hose cant hurt a thing. Well it started to creek and pop I took to the shop. $120.00 later the pops and creeks were gone and I had a lesson in cleaning my bike. Water hose has not touched my bike since! I bought a nice set of brushes to knock the mud off and a damp rag after that. I also use Maxxima SC1 on the places more likely to get muddy. If any thing sticks to those spots it falls right off with minimal effort.

  • #216261

    Pedal strikes do have consequences aside from destroying any momentum that you may have, that was my lesson this weekend.
    I bought my first full suspension bike this weekend and I am not used to having my pedals reach as low as they do when the suspension compresses. So on my second ride I struck a few rocks and sure enough the threads in one of the crank arms were partially torn out, crank arm to be replaced..

    • #216292

      the threads in one of the crank arms were partially torn out, crank arm to be replaced..

      Something similar happened to me once and fortunately I was able to salvage the cranks. Take the bike to the shop and see if they can re-tap (I think that’s the term) the threads. I had a brand new set of carbon XO cranks and apparently one of my pedals wasn’t on tight enough. It worked itself loose and while riding at night, I stepped on the pedal and it just ripped right out, taking the last few threads with it. The fix was quick and the shop didn’t even charge me a dime. 🙂

  • #216264

    Never refuse an after-ride free beer.

    Don’t ask how I know this…

    • #216268

      No tool (a tool to fix your bike / do maintenance) is as expensive as not having it at all especially when out in the middle of no where.

  • #216281

    Hesitation.

    Hesitation causes you to second guess your confidence and judgement, and can be disastrous.  Second guessing yourself and sacrificing physics for the sake of confidence usually ends up in you going too slow and ending up somewhere that looks nothing like what you had in mind.  Confidence paired with using a little skill will allow you to push the envelope to another level while mitigating a yard sale due to hesitation.

    Probably my biggest one there…

    Take care,-GT

  • #216288

    I learned early on how important it is to fuel up before a ride in hot/humid weather.  Eat a healthy breakfast if you don’t want to bonk and get dropped.

  • #216302

    Something that I have learned continuously in mountain biking and in life in general is to go with your gut feeling. If something doesn’t feel right or seems to good to be true, it likely is.

    Here’s a recent example. I have employed riser bars since the late 90’s, but a few years ago low-rise and no-rise bars became popular. More control, a lower and more aggressive position, better handling, etc. were among the the tag lines for this. I put low-rise bars on my bike and thought, okay, they look cool in a racer sorta way. I only race for comic relief though. I began noticing some lower back soreness that I’d never had. It was much harder to lift the front of the bike and the whole thing seemed twitchy. What really woke me up was when I washed out in a corner and my brake lever scratched my top tube. Bummer. I learned my lesson and went back to high(er—35mm or 20mm) rise bars. I happily look forward to installing my new Chromag BZA’s soon.

  • #216434

    <div class=”even bbp-parent-forum-44514 bbp-parent-topic-215462 bbp-reply-position-8 user-id-1 topic-author post-216292 reply type-reply status-publish hentry”>
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    Something similar happened to me once and fortunately I was able to salvage the cranks. Take the bike to the shop and see if they can re-tap (I think that’s the term) the threads. I had a brand new set of carbon XO cranks and apparently one of my pedals wasn’t on tight enough. It worked itself loose and while riding at night, I stepped on the pedal and it just ripped right out, taking the last few threads with it. The fix was quick and the shop didn’t even charge me a dime.

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    <div id=”post-216302″ class=”bbp-reply-header”> There really wasn’t anything left of the threads unfortunately, I just have an SLX crank so it wasn’t horrendously expensive to have the shop order the part.</div>

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