Time for tech to trickle down.

Forums Mountain Bike Forum Time for tech to trickle down.

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Jonnorth Jonnorth 1 year, 2 months ago.

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  • #239148

    Since the trails here in Minnesota are still closed, I thought I’d share my opinion on something. In all my research before I bought my first quality bike I have discovered something that I think could be improved easily within the industry. There are a few little spots where manufacturers could get rid of some older tech, and put out better bikes. #1 Square taper bottom brackets. Spending slightly more on a hollow style BB would make bikes better. #2 3×8 drivetrains.  Going hand in hand with #1 let’s ditch this old DT. 2x9s are affordable enough to go on entry level hardtails, fat bikes, and full suspension bikes. #3 Quick release skewers. Standardize the through axle as the method of choice. #4 The tapered headtube. Why not make this standard too.  I realize prices would increase, but we would all be getting a higher quality bike as a result. I think personally most people who are serious about bikes would appreciate the value for money. Also by using the economy of scale method, I personally believe prices would increase only marginally while delivering a much better product worthy of upgrades in the future. (Which guarantees the accessory market stays strong). I spent six months researching this topic, and ended up spending double my original budget. I understand quality costs money, but I believe there are some areas where manufacturers could do better for a marginal increase in price.

  • #239173

    #1 Square taper bottom brackets. Spending slightly more on a hollow style BB would make bikes better. #2 3×8 drivetrains.  Going hand in hand with #1 let’s ditch this old DT. 2x9s are affordable enough to go on entry level hardtails, fat bikes, and full suspension bikes. #3 Quick release skewers. Standardize the through axle as the method of choice. #4 The tapered headtube. Why not make this standard too.

    How much are you spending on this bike? $200?

  • #239250

    @GregHeil: #1 Square taper bottom brackets. Spending slightly more on a hollow style BB would make bikes better. #2 3×8 drivetrains.  Going hand in hand with #1 let’s ditch this old DT. 2x9s are affordable enough to go on entry level hardtails, fat bikes, and full suspension bikes. #3 Quick release skewers. Standardize the through axle as the method of choice. #4 The tapered headtube. Why not make this standard too.

    “How much are you spending on this bike? $200?”

    Uh yeah, this^^^. Seriously, the only places selling bikes with the stuff you mentioned are big box stores at the bottom rung. The stuff you speak of hasn’t even been on brand name entry level bikes for nearly ten years or more.

    @DanielTribby: “I spent six months researching this topic, and ended up spending double my original budget.”

    I have to call bs on this. Six months?!? I know Minnesota gets cold and crushingly boring in the winter (I lived there for 2.5 years), but come on. Just be honest and say what yr budget is/was. We will not judge…too much. 😉

  • #239253

    Every mtb or fat bike under 1000 is this way.  Have you even looked at entry level bikes recently? Im guessing not. Every Framed bike for example has only through axle on the fork. Every Kona below 1000 has QR. Every Norco as well. Felt, Giant, Trek all the same. Most around 600 to 1000 still run 3×8 or 2×9 with ST or Octa. I’m talking about value/money in beginner range. I ended up buying a Kona Wo ($1200 which was double my intended budget) As for my time frame I had some things come up that kept me from moving on something sooner in combination with taking my time and evaluating my options. You guys have a strange way of welcoming new people to a sport….forget I even brought it up I guess. How dare I rock the boat.

  • #239267

    Hey Daniel, welcome to MTB.  Guys get a little rough, but you can really learn a lot from them if you just take it as fun poking.  No one is being truly mean, they are just passionate and the written word always seems a little harsher.  This site has been the single most influential resource for me as a somewhat new rider- 5yrs.  Think about buying used in your price range.  Good luck, hope it warms up soon!

  • #239295

    Hi,

    Some interesting points here.

    I think the entry and low-to-mid levels for ‘proper’ bikes is really tough, a bit exploitative and relies heavy on marketing rather than performance.  The preponderance of top-end bikes on websites and in magazines makes this tougher and makes researching it hard; as you have found.

    No one s really shaking that market up right now (although in the UK Go-outdoors range is I think). It is probably still ripe for a (maybe smaller) firm to do something that could make them heros to a lot of beginners and potentially make them a good amount of money.  That tends to happen eventually in closed/stagnant or exploitative markets.

    I think if you have $4k plus there is a lot of data and opinion and you would be pretty sure to get a great bike.  I think folk on that budget forget how messy the rest of the market is.

    Hope you are happy with your bike.  I was in a similar position earlier this year.  Really happy with mine!

    cheers

    j

  • #239312

    All makes sense, and yes, it could bring newer tech to the first time buyer, or more frugal, buyer.  However, manufacturers still make older standards not only for new bikes, but also because there are millions of rides out there that still use that older tech, so there’s still a market for replacement parts.  New tech is much more expansive.  I went though updating my older XC.  Has great geometry for what it does, but was a 3×9 ISIS drive.  The cascade affect of updating wound up costing over $1,000.  Yup, coulda bought a new bike for that, but now it’s an all XT 1×11 (with the exception of an 11 speed e*thirteen cassette with the range of a 12).  My point being, in my opinion, there’s probably still a sizable market for older tech for those that don’t want, or need, or can afford, to upgrade to new standards, or who just needs repairs.  Consider this, car/motor parts for cars over 50 years old are still readily made.

  • #239315

    Hi,

    Agreed, long may they continue to make the older standard stuff.

    I have a soft spot for my 2007 hard-tail. (QR, square taper etc!).  Recently missed (didn’t check pre-ride, silly error!) a loose QR bolt on a 6h trail ride so v.pleased good quality QR skewers and axles still available!

    Hubs are also getting worn (despite bearing re-builds) so will be looking at new (old fashioned) hubs soon too.

    J

  • #239316

    Hi,

    Agreed, long may they continue to make the older standard stuff.

    I have a soft spot for my 2005 hard-tail. (QR, square taper etc!).  Recently missed (didn’t check pre-ride, silly error!) a loose QR bolt on a 6h trail ride so v.pleased good quality QR skewers and axles still available!

    Hubs are also getting worn (despite bearing re-builds) so will be looking at new (old fashioned) hubs soon too.

    J

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