Suggestions for getting a tire off of rim

Forums Mountain Bike Forum Suggestions for getting a tire off of rim

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of m@frit m@frit 5 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #240143

    I purchased a Diamondback Release several months ago. I experienced my first flat on it the other day and I am having a helluva a time getting the tire off the rim. The tire is a 27.5 Schwalbe Hans Dampf mounted on a DB Blanchard 28R rim. I cannot get the bead to pop out with tools or even by standing on the tire and pulling upward on the rim. I’ve fixed flats many times and have never had this problem. It almost seems like the tire is glued or fused to the rim.  Any suggestions are welcome.

  • #240148

    Huh, that’s weird. Is the tire mounted tubeless? Not that it matters really, but it might explain the tight lock on the bead, or indicate sealant has formed a tight hold. (If you are running sealant, I’m curious to know what kind.)

    I would suggest starting at the valve and going around the tire, one side at a time, pushing the bead inward (toward the center of the rim) with your thumb. You’re basically looking for a weak spot where the tire isn’t stuck quite as hard. Once you get a little separation, you should be able to get a tire lever in there, which you can then run all the way around.

    I’ve definitely had some tires that were difficult to separate, usually as a result of dried sealant.

    • #240190

      Thanks for the suggestion. It’s a tubeless ready rim but it came stock with a tubed tire. I could find no discernable weak spots around the rim that would allow me to work a lever in. I contacted Diamondback and the representative did acknowledge the Schwalbe tires can be difficult to remove. In his email he did seem to suggest that they will replace with different tires if the bike is still under warranty. Still might go to the LBS and see if they can remove it.

  • #240151

    Hi Chris. I have a couple of mountain bikes with wheels that have fairly aggressive bead locks around the inside. I use a vise to pinch the tire together and then push the wheel over until the tire pops off the bead. I’m always careful not to leverage the wheel against the top of the vise, so as not to damage the wheel. BTW, these are carbon wheels. It’s been the only way that’s worked for me so far.

    Knock-on-wood, I haven’t had to repair a flat trailside…yet. Hope that helps.

  • #240158

    Try calling diamondback service and see if this is a typical issue, they may be able to help.  Ask for Reinout, he was very helpful.  I have the release 5c with arc 30 rims and they came off and went on easily.  Good luck.

    • #240231

      Diamondback technical support advised me to cut the tires off. They are going to send Maxxis Ardents to replace the Schwalbes.

  • #240160

    I have a 2016 Diamondback Release 1. I had the same problem removing a tire from the rim so I took it to my LBS. After fixing it, the mechanic said that it took 2 people at the shop to remove the tire from the rim. They put the wheel over the rim of a large round trash can to work the tire loose. The Schwalbes that came with my bike have a wire bead that conforms very tightly to the inner part of the rim. Realizing that I would be stuck if I needed to change a flat on the trail I decided to switch to a different tire. I ended up cutting the Schwalbes off of my rims (including wire snippers for the beads) and replacing them with foldable Maxxis tires. There was a silver lining: in the process of doing this I switched over to a tubeless setup (the valves were included when I bought my bike) which made a significant improvement in bike acceleration and which has saved me from flatting after encounters with thorns.

    • #240166

      Like ncbikeguy said, “The Schwalbes that came with my bike have a wire bead that conforms very tightly to the inner part of the rim… I ended up cutting the Schwalbes off of my rims“, I had to cut off a tire once as well.  Different wire beaded tire on a different tubeless rim altogether.  Never thought about it, but maybe this scenario is more common than not.

  • #240167

    What I do to unseat the bead is I grab the tire with my fingers pointing towards the rim and my palms on the tread, then I bend my wrists back while gripping tightly and pushing the rim forward slightly to pull the bead on the far side of the tire up and back. For this it is best to have the wheel either on the ground or braced against yourself. This usually does the trick but I haven’t done this with wire bead tires, and I don’t know if they lock into the rim tighter. When my tires get stuck it’s usually due to dried sealant.

  • #240197

    Had this happen last week on a 2017 Rocky Mountain Growler with Alex tubeless compatible rims.  Just bought it (used) and the WTB Rangers on it were shot, so I went to change them and the damn tires wouldn’t budge a millimeter.  Ended up cutting them off but still couldn’t get the wire bead off.  Ended up going to the local shop and it took two the shop guys to pull them them apart enough to snip the bead.  The Rangers were not set up tubeless.  My new McFly’s went on nicely (Tubeless) but they sure snapped when I inflated them.  Concerned I may have the same issue next time. 🙁

     

  • #240198

    I think the Schwalbe tires are exceptionally tight. I just put a Nobby Nic on a 27.5 Roam 40 and it took so much effort to get on I thought it wouldn’t work and almost gave up on it. But I was eventually able to get it on and the thing held air for days before I put the sealant in (Waiting for other parts)

    Use a plastic tire lever and work it in. Once the seal is broken, it’ll slide off.

  • #240233

    Cutting through the bead without damaging the rim might be tricky (cutting off the tire would be pretty straightforward).  It’s likely that the sealant has dried, effectively gluing the bead to the rim.  A cheap fix might be to remove the valve core and add some very slightly soapy water through the valve.  spin it around to distribute the soapy water, then try to pry it off again.  Might need to let the water site for a while to loosen things up.

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