Dropper post on All Mountain bikes?

Forums Mountain Bike Forum Dropper post on All Mountain bikes?

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of schwim schwim 2 days, 4 hours ago.

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  • #269891

    Quick survey question. Who rides with a dropper post on an all mountain bike?

  • #269922

    I’m a big believer in droppers for all types, especially for All Mountain (if what you’re referring to is mid-level suspension travel that will be going both up and down hills). You might convince me I don’t need a dropper for cross-country, but I’ll take one on every other type.

  • #269923

    Currently I only have a dropper on my trail bike (YT Jeffsy) but I intend to add one to my fatbike (Fuji Wendigo) before winter. I’m also sort of forced to add one to my hardtail (Charge Cooker 3) to accomodate my son’s Shotgun Kid’s Seat. While I’m on the subject; the Jeffsy has an E13 TRS, I’ll almost definitely go with a PNW Cascade on the fattie and a PNW Pine for the hardtail. Its also highly likely that all of the posts will use Wolftooth levers.

  • #269926

    I’ll likely be in the minority here but I don’t use a dropper post.  While I think they will help you descend more easily and quickly, I don’t think they are are worth the added expense, maintenance, and weight.  With a modern-progressive-geometry long-travel full-sus 29+ Trailbike, I’m not struggling in the least to descend without a dropper post.  And I don’t care that I might have gone just a wee bit faster with the seatpost down. When I’m riding, I don’t want to manage a bunch of buttons.   I like keeping my handlebar uncluttered.  I don’t have or want a remote lockout either.  A single 1x shifter and two brakes is enough for me.  Keep it simple and uncomplicated and low maintenance.

  • #269929

    I’m a huge proponent of droppers.  Like many things I think it comes down to the trails you ride and your riding style.  I have a dropper on each of my bikes for two primary reasons: (1) For the way I ride (i.e. fairly aggressively, at least for me) I often want to keep my center of gravity as low as possible and (2) as I move the bike around I do not want the saddle in my way.  I would not want to be riding technical singletrack (up or down) nor would I want to be bunny hopping at speed or landing drops with my saddle up.  FWIW, I use my dropper almost as much as my shifter creating leverage where I want/need it while giving myself the ability to freely move the bike around.

  • #269930

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>For me the dropper has been one of the best upgrade I’ve done to my bike… Many times, I feel I’m overusing the dropper… The most minimum decent and dropper goes down…minimum climb, dropper up… Almost like a reflex. That being said, I cannot think of any of my future bikes without a dropper. It just gives me so much confidence to go faster…</p>

  • #269994

    I’m like renehlarue. I ride a hardtail and any time I need to pedal that post goes up. When I see the slope drop ahead of me and/or Whoop sections . . . dropper down.

    I’ll still do the same thing when I get a full suspension bike.

  • #269996

    Thanks for the input. I have a dropper on my XC which I use a lot between features, assents and fall trails. On my all mountain bike, my fixed seat height is slightly below my attack position and rarely do I feel the need to change the height on more challenging trails. I am planning on switching the to the dropper post and see if I use it much on my all mountain.

  • #270000

    xbdGramcounter

    Favorite upgrade I’ve added to my bike. I use it constantly to get loosely goosey on the trail.

  • #270001

    @PlusbikeNerd: “I’ll likely be in the minority here but I don’t use a dropper post.  While I think they will help you descend more easily and quickly, I don’t think they are are worth the added expense, maintenance, and weight.  With a modern-progressive-geometry long-travel full-sus 29+ Trailbike, I’m not struggling in the least to descend without a dropper post.  And I don’t care that I might have gone just a wee bit faster with the seatpost down. When I’m riding, I don’t want to manage a bunch of buttons.   I like keeping my handlebar uncluttered.  I don’t have or want a remote lockout either.  A single 1x shifter and two brakes is enough for me.  Keep it simple and uncomplicated and low maintenance.”

    IMHO riding with a dropper post has never been about making things easier or faster, but instead more fun. I would be willing to bet that I personally have used a dropper post longer than anyone on this site having first employed a Descender post in ’05 and have had some type of dropper on every mountain bike I’ve had since.

    So just for a second  and because I’m bored on a Wednesday afternoon, I’d like to address your concerns. Regarding the added expense, yes they cost more than a rigid seat post (unless you have a Thomson or an ENVE). That said, you can get into one for under $150 and actually a good one at that (more on that in a moment). I believe that you will get an improved riding experience that will pay for that $150 ad infinitum times over. The Brand X Ascend models (same as the RaceFace Aeffect I have) from Chain Reaction are dumb simple and work great.

    As far as maintenance goes…what maintenance? The most I’ve ever done with any of the droppers I’ve owned (3 Gravity Droppers, 4 Reverbs, a RaceFace Aeffect and a OneUp) was to clean them off and spray them with Maxima SC1 although basically up until discovering that wonderful product I did nothing other than clean the bike. The service interval on any of them was maybe every year-year and half where with the Rock Shox ones I’d send them to SRAM service at QBP and get them back in no more than 5 days and the most that ever cost was $40. The others I’ve done nothing, NOTHING…other than change the cable which takes maybe 10 minutes including drinking a beer and looking at social media sites simultaneously.

    Finally, weight is only an issue if you are racing cross country (or racing period) and even then it’s waaaaaaaay overrated as being a mitigating factor in performance. Not to mention that you will never notice the non-rotational weight of a dropper post especially if you are riding a 29+ bike.

    In my experience, employing a dropper post has become so intuitive that I use it maybe as much as or more than my brakes. At the end of the day, you do whatever turns you on. However, fourteen years ago when first got one and heard every excuse from every rider as to why they’d never need one I just laughed promising them that they would become standard gear on all bikes. 99% of those same folks that scoffed at them back then are riding them now. They make riding way more fun without any real sacrifices. Party.

  • #270096

    The only two reasons I can see for not using a dropper post is:

    1. racing where every once counts.

    2. just can’t afford it.

    Seeing as you can get a decent cheap dropper for about $100, and most serious riders spend more than that on dedicated shoes, and my $100 dropper post lasted longer than my ridding buddy’s $120 5/10 riding shoes. So if you can afford fancy shoes, you can afford a dropper. After three years of using my cheap dropper it needs a $30 replacement air cartridge.  Some, even cheaper ones, have air fittings so you can just add air.

     

    And personally I have never paid more than $50 for a pair of riding shoes.

  • #270117

    I LOVE MY DROPPERS!  I use them on any bike I own and I always buy the cheapies off of Amazon.  I’ve gotten thousands of miles out of them without any failure.  Other than having to put some air in one of them every year or so, they are set-it-and-forget-it.

    They have changed my ride for the better more than any other component I’ve ever purchased.

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